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Happy Thanksgiving

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 25, 2020

Judy and I would like to wish you all a Happy & Safe Thanksgiving.

Dark skies and bright stars are the main attraction at the top stargazing spots around the world, Travel and Leisure have shared The 10 Best Places To See Stars Around The Globe and the Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah comes in #2 on the list. Liz Jackson is a planner for Park City and said the “dark sky” movement began as a way to reduce light pollution in more urban areas and is led by the International Dark Sky Association. She said changes to the city’s lighting regulations are now a priority.

The Natural Bridges National Monument in remote Lake Powell, Utah, was the first certified International Dark Sky Park, a designation bestowed by the International Dark-Sky Association, the leading organization combating light pollution worldwide. (There are now more than 130 certified International Dark Sky Places in the world.) The designation recognizes the area as having some of the darkest and clearest skies in the world, and acknowledges the efforts that have been extended to make it so, positioning darkness as a resource worthy of protecting and conserving.

The main attraction of the dark skies here is the “river of light” phenomenon created by the Milky Way as it rises over the Owachomo Bridge, a natural rock formation. The bridge forms a sort of window into the night sky, beautifully framing the thousands of stars visible with the naked eye. Plan to camp overnight for the full experience. Looking for another great stargazing spot in Utah? East Canyon State Park is one of the most recent additions to the list of International Dark Sky Parks.

Ski and snowboard season is here and for 8th time, Deer Valley Resort named best U.S. Ski Resort 2020 by World Ski Awards. Utah (ABC4 News) – Deer Valley Resort, once again, has been named Best United States’ Ski Resort 2020 by World Ski Awards, holding onto this title for the eighth year in a row. Representatives for Deer Valley say despite 2020’s challenges on the tourism industry, World Ski Awards program saw a record number of votes from ski tourism consumers, and the organization’s website continues to receive more search traffic than in any previous year. Out of 18 U.S. nominees, Deer Valley® was voted the winner of the industry’s coveted award. See you on the slopes.

Skiing & Real Estate

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 18, 2020

Park City Resorts Are Ready For A Season Unlike Any Other and with opening day of the Park City ski season just a week away, the executives at both Park City Mountain and Deer Valley Resorts talked about what will be a ski season unlike any other. KPCW shares that in their annual update to members of the Park City Board of Realtors, Chief Operating Officers at Deer Valley Todd Shallan and at Park City Mountain Mike Goar reviewed their plans for a ski season in the midst of a pandemic with the goals remain the same – Get open and stay open.

“The bottom line is we are planning on opening on December 5th and our goal is to stay open and keep people as safe as we possibly can,” said Shallan. Mike Goar added, “ yeah it’s certainly a different year, to say the least. I would say kind of our operating motto if you will is, open to stay open.” The good news from both resorts is that despite not having any J1 visa workers – their staffing levels look better now than it did a year ago. While their pandemic operating plans have been released to the public more than a month ago, something new that was mentioned is that Park City Mountain – in addition to making a reservation to get on a chairlift, reservations will also be required at all of their on-mountain lodges and restaurants. The main goal is all about keeping guests and employees safe.

Park City is scheduled to open both its Park City and Canyons Village bases on Friday, November 20th and Deer Valley will open on Saturday Dec. 5th.

Urban development experts say Utah could be a hot destination for people who, even before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, were already migrating out of the biggest U.S. cities. Deseret News shares - Is COVID-19 the ‘great accelerator’? Utah set to win big as big cities continue to lose residents. Even before the onset of COVID-19, big U.S. metro areas were losing the domestic migration war to smaller, midsize cities and suburbs in a trend reversal that dates back almost a decade. Now, restrictions brought on by the global pandemic have only highlighted the downsides of big cities and the relative upsides of locales with assets like low cost of living, growing economies and easy access to outdoor recreation opportunities.

Utah could be perfectly positioned to become one of the top destinations for those fleeing urban residential settings that have become, for some, considerably less desirable amid the current public health crisis. Data shows residents, on a net basis, have been moving out of U.S. metro areas with populations of 1 million or more and finding new homes in smaller cities going back to 2012. And in the past several months, restrictions in place across the country aiming to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 have functioned as a “great accelerator” of that migration.

The Utah model is something that is worth studying. The state’s “welcoming atmosphere” and “greater family friendliness” as factors that make it an increasingly attractive destination for people looking to move. To read the entire article CLICK HERE.

With the market in Utah booming, the Park City real estate market continues to boom amid the pandemic according to The Park Record as the Park City real estate market continues to surge, with sales in the third quarter more than doubling the activity in the same period in 2019. In the spring, the coronavirus pandemic shook the Park City business community, forcing the closure of non-essential businesses and thrusting the economy into a sudden downturn. Amid the upheaval of that period and the months that have followed, however, one industry crucial to Park City’s economy has experienced a dramatic run of success. And third-quarter data from the Park City Board of Realtors indicates that the real estate market continues to boom.

“You’ve got an environment here where you’ve got hiking, biking trails, you’ve got a couple of lakes nearby that you can boat in — golf courses, fishing,” Winstead said. “I don’t think the world really realized there were so many opportunities in such a small area.”

The question now is whether the people who’ve bought homes here during the COVID crisis plan to live in Park City permanently or retreat back to urban areas when the pandemic is over. Winstead, for one, has heard from many Realtors whose clients say they want to make the Park City area their permanent home. “It’s hard to leave Park City once you’ve been here,” he said. “Every time I think about going on a vacation, I’m like, ‘Well, where’s a better place to go than Park City?’

Home Upgrades

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 11, 2020

This week we are sharing easy home upgrades as we start getting ready for the snowy days and more time inside. Read on to see what colors to paint your kitchen cabinets, how to turn your living room into a mulit-functional space and tips to turn your bathroom into a relaxing escape.

While spending more time at home, changing up the color of your kitchen cabinets can be a great way to mix things up and refresh a space that feels all too familiar these days. This Is the Color You Should Paint Your Kitchen Cabinets, according to the experts at Apartment Therapy. Gibbons spoke with Semihandmade, who shared a total of six options, ranging from warm whites to hues of blue, the all-time favorite color. In addition to classic beige, five other colors that are worth considering for your kitchen cabinet paint job.

Warm Whites: Classic white cabinetry is an enduring classic, and for 2021, Gibbons predicts a trend towards more delicate whites.

Moody Greens: Moody greens and deep blues lend a dramatic, editorial feel to a kitchen.

Shades of Blue: Gibbons says that blue hues look great in every room, no matter the decor style.

Sage and Seafoam: Green kitchens took over our Insta feeds in 2020, and Gibbons sees that trend continuing into 2021.

Punchy Pinks: Make a statement by painting your kitchen cabinets a soft, pale pink this really makes a statement in small doses too, like on a kitchen island, window frames, or even trim.

The living room is the every-room, so how do you design such a multifaceted space? Here are 5 Golden Rules for Designing a Great Living Room.

Don’t skimp on rug size - In a large room, like a living room, you can unify the space with a rug. And to do that, all of your furniture’s legs should sit on the rug. If your sofa is against the wall, the front legs of the furniture should sit on the rug.

Layer lighting - Overhead lighting is great, but it can be harsh. A soft glow creates a more intimate and sophisticated vibe. To achieve this look, add a variety of light sources—table lamps, floor lamps, wall sconces, bookshelf accent lights, and candles—to the room. 

Follow the rule of threes - Though three is considered the magic number, groupings of five, seven, or even nine also work well. An odd number of items not only looks more natural, it also forces your eyes to move around, creating more visual interest. For an even more attractive vignette, vary the size, height, and finish of the objects as well.

Choose the right accent tables - Coffee tables should be the same height as your sofa’s seat cushions, or very close to it. And end tables should be within a few inches of your sofa or chair’s arm height.

Float your furniture - It’s hard to create a conversation area when all of your furniture is pushed up against your walls. By floating sofas and chairs away from your walls—even by just a few inches—you instantly create a more intimate conversation space. If you have a very large living room, you can break up and group the furniture to create natural conversation spaces throughout the room. CLICK HERE to read the full article from Apartment Therapy.

If you thought the bathroom was your escape before, it’s even more important to make it your oasis now. Whether you’re flooded with Zoom meetings, homeschooling, or burnout from the work-from-home life, a daily bath or shower may sometimes be your only moment for precious alone time. Here are 7 Things To Create a “Perfect” Bathroom:

Stylish rugs - Small rugs are the quintessential bathroom staple. Not only do they provide functionality when placed right next to the shower, but they’re also great accent pieces if the room has neutral tones. Runners are great—or, smaller size antique rugs give the bathroom a modern, fresh feel.

Good lighting - Dimmable overhead lighting is an attractive option for a bathroom, as you can set the mood based on the task, be it a bath or a shower. Simply changing the wattage around your sink’s mirror can reinvigorate the space.

Framed artwork- Statement artwork brings your personality into the bathroom. Go for glass-framed artwork or vintage textiles and hang a series of similarly themed photos.

Storage pieces - Whether you’re refurbishing a master bathroom or a powder room, there’s a ton you can do to maximize storage. Add shelves inside your vanity mirror and use other space-saving pieces to declutter. Try turning a bar cart into a bathroom cart; then add candles and rolled up towels to up your design.

Soothing paint colors with accent wallpaper - To give your bathroom a tranquil feel, use neutral colors. If you’re not one for quiet colors, add wallpaper behind the vanity makes an accent wall that’s not overbearing.

New fixtures - Updating the hardware in your bathroom goes a long way. You can change the whole look of your bathroom and utilize the same plumbing. Consider replacing your old faucet with rose gold or matte fixtures. Refresh your shower experience with a new shower head, keeping in mind finish, size, and function.

Scent diffusers - A good scent is the hallmark of a luxurious bathroom. A diffuser on the vanity or by the bathtub elevates your style, while also giving the room an oasis-like vibe.

Visit Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 03, 2020

Happy Wednesday - Thank you for reading our 300th blog last week! We hope you all had a Happy and Safe Halloween. This week we are sharing recent articles on Park City in both Vogue and Living Gossip as our little town proves to be a lovely place to visit, especially at Christmas.

Last week, Airbnb released a report about how Americans’ travel habits have changed amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Once upon a time, weekend trips or journeys to far-flung locales were on everyone's wishlists. But with international borders closed and many metropolitan destinations under stringent lockdowns, Airbnb found that its users were searching for domestic escapes with close proximity to nature. And they wanted to stay longer: The company found that people who have the opportunity to work from anywhere booked longer stays—as in two-plus weeks—especially in places with abundant natural surroundings. Vogue shares Where Americans Are Traveling Locally in 2020 and Park City is the number one trending location.

Nestled in the Wasatch Mountain range, Park City, Utah, is an adventurer’s paradise: you can hike, fly fish, horseback ride, white river raft, skeet shoot, mountain bike, and so on. In the winter, skiers flock to the slopes of Park City and Deer Valley. The town itself is a classic western outpost with many stores selling cowboy boots or wood carvings by local artisans. Stop by 350 Main, the classic bistro that’s served Park City for over 25 years and Alpine Distilling.

Need some suggestions about where to stay? They love this cottage chock full of vintage details that’s a few minute’s walk from Main Street, or, for a splashier stay, this luxury cabin perched on the slopes of Park City Mountain that has an outdoor fire pit overlooking the evergreens. If a hotel is more your style, there are plenty of luxurious options: the Montage and Stein Eriksen Lodge in Deer Valley are both storied ski resorts, whereas the 3,500 acre The Lodge at Blue Sky in nearby Wanship is perfect for all-season alpine adventures. To find out the other cities that made the list - CLICK HERE.

Christmas may be a couple months away, but in The Best Christmas Getaways in the US by Living Gossip Park City comes in number one. Christmas is a magical time of the year wherever you spend it, but there are some places that are just a little more magical than others. Coming in number one is Park City, Utah. This charming village is nestled in between mountains, creating the perfect wintry backdrop for your Christmas getaway. It might be the snowy landscape or the numerous Christmas events, but Park City is a popular place to celebrate the festive season and here are a few things not to miss.

  • Take a ride on the North Pole Express - During the holiday season, Park City runs a North Pole Express service on the Heber Valley Railroad so everyone can experience the magic of Christmas. Passengers will be treated to live entertainment, hot cocoa, and even a present from Santa himself!
  • Attend the tree lighting ceremony - The perfect start to the festive season, the annual tree lighting ceremony will get you in the holiday spirit. There’s live music, market stalls, and fireworks to make the night truly special.
  • Snowfest at Park City Mountain - Snowfest runs for two weeks over Christmas and New Year’s at Park City Mountain. There are different events every day and you just might get to meet Santa!
  • Park City Holiday Spectacular Sing-a-long - A family favorite, the Park City Holiday Spectacular Sing-a-long brings people of all ages together to sing their favorite Christmas tunes. The show features many local performers – come prepared to sing your favorite Christmas carols!
To find out all the cities that made the list according to Living Gossip - CLICK HERE.

Interested in all things happening in Park City, visit www.visitparkcity.com

Happy Halloween

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 27, 2020

This week we look at some socially distanced dining experiences in Park City, bulbs to plant in your garden for Spring and a continuation of more things to do and celebrate at home as Halloween will be quieter this year without our Main Street celebration.

If you are in Park City, Travel Awaits' Wendy Lee shares 8 Fantastic And Unique Dining Experiences In Park City. Due to changing advisories, please check local travel guidelines before visiting. Here are eight fantastic and unique dining experiences to consider on your next trip to Park City, listed in no particular order.

1. Go For A Sleigh Ride up the snowy slopes of the Park City Mountain Resort to the rustic Snowed Inn Lodge. This adventure is well suited for a multigenerational gathering, since children of all ages can be accommodated. Reservations are required. If you’re visiting during the holidays, be sure to make reservations far in advance. Though the sleigh ride is short, it can be very cold, so dress accordingly.

2. Have Dinner In A Yurt -Instead of taking a sleigh ride to a lodge, you can opt to take one to a yurt. This time, the sleigh is pulled uphill for 1,800 feet along a snowy trail that concludes at The Viking Yurt. Joy and Geir Vik came up with the idea for the experience and opened the yurt in 1999. Inside this unique structure, you’ll see a baby grand piano. Throughout the evening, guests enjoy music performed by a concert pianist. It is a wonderful option for couples seeking a romantic evening out. Reservations are required. If you can’t make it for dinner, but do want to see the yurt, try coming for lunch instead.

3. Enjoy Fireside Dining - Fireside Dining, they aren’t just for ambience, the dining room features large windows that provide lovely views of the surrounding mountains. The meal begins with warm raclette cheese served with cured meats and freshly baked baguettes. Then you’ll choose from several entrees, like veal and mushroom stew, roast leg of lamb, and beef short ribs. The perfect winter dessert of fondue concludes the dining experience. Beer, wine, and cocktails are available for purchase. Come hungry, since this is an all-you-can-eat meal.

4. Sample Seafood On The Slopes -You may not expect excellent seafood high up in the mountains, but that’s exactly what you’ll get at Rime Seafood and Raw Bar. Located in a refurbished cabin at the top of the Jordanelle ski run, Rime is the first-ever slopeside raw bar. And since it’s also a ski-in, ski-out establishment, you can enjoy a meal of fresh seafood at any time during your day of skiing. If you don’t ski, or just want to visit the restaurant, you can purchase a foot passenger lift ticket.

5. Dine Outdoors Amidst Mountain Scenery - Glitretind Restaurant in the Stein Eriksen Lodge offers award-winning summertime al fresco dining. Take a seat on their wooden terrace and admire the surrounding forested mountain slopes. Summer days bring hundreds of mountain bikers to this area, but at night, it’s a quiet oasis. The lodge is named for the famed Nordic skier Stein Eriksen, who lived for many years in Park City.

6. Have A Drink Fireside - head to the St. Regis Bar in Deer Valley for great views and memorable cocktails. During the winter, you can ski up to this bar, but at other times of year, you’ll need to take the funicular from the parking lot. If the weather permits, head outside, grab a seat by the fireplace, and appreciate the views of the surrounding mountains. While the drinks are the main attraction, the food is also excellent. Try the steak frites, the desert mountain cheeseburger, or the black truffle pizza. The bar is restricted to guests 21 and over.

7. Savor A Locally Sourced, Wood-Fired Dinner - Firewood. Every dish is cooked over a wood fire. Located in a historic building on Park City’s Main Street, Firewood features decor that’s almost stark, with reclaimed bricks and timers. Guests can watch their food being prepared through the large bank of windows dividing the seating area and kitchen. Be sure to make reservations in advance.

8. Combine Mines And Wines - Park City has a long history of silver mining dating back to 1868, and from those days come great stories. The Fox School of Wine weaves those tales into a unique 3-hour wine-tasting experience. Perfectly paired snacks are provided along the way. Much of this tour takes place outdoors, so dress appropriately. Guests must be at least 21 years of age.

There may be snow on the ground in Park City, but there is still a little time to think about your Spring garden. Here are 8 Bulbs to Plant Now for the Prettiest Flower Garden in Spring. October is the best month to plant your flower bulbs, which need to over-winter in order to bloom in spring. Daffodils and tulips might be the most familiar picks, but they’re not the only bulbs worth planting for spring.

Daffodils - these are an old-school trademark of spring—and for good reason. When they start to pop out of the ground, it’s a sign that winter is over and warmer months are on the way.

Lily of the Valley - appear at the beginning of spring. The plant produces sweet, white bell-shaped flowers that look like they’re made of porcelain. It is a perennial and has been known to survive the harshest of winters, so you’ll only have to plant this one once.

Tulips -add variety amongst all the bright colors of spring. If you choose to plant and love this tulip, be prepared for a wild amount of depth and dimension to appear in your garden beds.

Crocus - The spring crocus is one of the first blooms to emerge from the cold ground at the end of winter. The typical snow crocus has thin leaves and only reaches 4 inches tall. These plants produce the most adorable blooms that make them perfect for the smaller, empty spots in your garden.

Grape Hyacinth - is in the lily family, which you can tell by the long, thin foliage. It is a small plant that makes a great addition to the small corners and borders of gardens.

Anemones - not only do they bloom at the onset of spring, but they continue to produce flowers until the early summer. Anemones can generate a huge amount of blooms per bulb—sometimes up to 20.

Ranunculus - the other favorite spring flower, have crepe-paper thin petals that overlap in dozens of layers. Note: If you live in zones 7 or colder, you’ll need to plant your ranunculus in early spring instead.

Allium - The last place on this list goes to a plant the looks like it’s straight out of a Dr. Suess book. Allium, also known as ornamental onion, are part of the same vegetable family as shallots, onions and garlic. However, this ornamental variety of onion doesn’t belong in the veggie plot—instead, give it a well-deserved spot in your perennial garden.

Last week we shared Apartment Therapy's 100 Things to Look Forward to This Fall and Winter, this week we share the continuation of More things to do and celebrate.

Send a book, get a book: Set up a book exchange with friends where you mail a book, read it, then send it along to the next person on the list. You can also do this same system with other items, like puzzles or board games.

Establish a TBR fall/winter list: Create a “to be read” list of reads, then make it a mission to knock out all the books by the end of winter (deadline of March 21, set). Get a friend to do it with you (with their own list of books) so you can hold each other accountable.

Guess that scent: Put your nose to the test with this fun guessing game. Grab the candles you already own, put them in brown paper bags, mix them up so you’re not sure which is which, and try to sniff out the scents.

Virtual potluck, “Chopped” style: Write common pantry staples on individual strips of paper, throw them in a bowl, and pick three at random. Then, communicate the ingredients to a group of friends, and let everyone get cooking/baking with the three ingredients, plus up to three additional items of their choosing.

Short story club: Start doing a virtual short story club with a group of friends or family. Someone different picks a short story (that’s available for free online), and every week you pick a night to discuss. It’s a low-lift way to keep reading and stay in touch with friends.

Treat yourself with learning: Browse MasterClass, Coursera, Airbnb Online Experiences, etc. and treat yourself to one class that’s something you’ve always wanted to learn more about or have a passion for.

Dream virtual destination: Pick a destination that you’ve always wanted to travel to (perhaps it was on your 2020/2021 list) and create an at-home itinerary that’s inspired by it!

Future trip planning: While international travel isn’t really a thing right now, there’s nothing preventing you from planning that dream trip. Pick the destination and do some fun research—browse rentals, search for the best restaurants/activities, what you would do for transportation, etc.

Coloring pages-turned-wall art: Create your own piece of wall art while getting to expressively color.

Switcharoo Day: Set a date with a family member/friend to gather up five home items each of you no longer want (board games, planters, books, blanket, etc.), then trade them for the five items they want to give you.

Thematic TV/movie night: Do a pop culture binge-watch night where you set the scene and make drinks/snacks based off of what you’re watching.

Pen pal partnership: Establish a pen pal to keep in touch with throughout the fall and winter months. Use your favorite stationery, shower your envelopes with stickers, create a fun theme for every month’s letter, ask a fun question at the end of each note to leave you in suspense—make it fun and personal.

At-home spa time: Recreate a spa-like experience at home.

Let is snow (angel): If you happen to live in a place where there’s snow, don’t just let it sit there on the ground (although it is pretty to watch). Grab your waterproof pants and jacket, head outside, and get down (literally) with making some snow angels.

Old-fashioned snowball fight: Again, if you live where it snows, round up your housemates and any neighboring friends and family for a playful snowball battle. Not only is this activity free and comes with easy setup (thanks, Mother Nature), but it also abides by social distancing rules.

Epic fort-building: Revisit one of the best childhood activities and build yourself the best fort with everything around you. Grab a kitchen chair, drape your favorite massive fleece blanket over it, throw every single pillow imaginable underneath, and continue on the mission to achieve the ultimate coziness.

Leaf decorating: Put all the vibrant, unique leaves that fall to the ground to good use within your home. Go outside, take a long walk around your neighborhood, and gather the leaves that catch your attention along the way. Then, find a glass vase or bowl and arrange them inside, or hang them all on a string or wire and drape your walls with them.

Cozy happy hour: Pick a day in the middle of winter and schedule a virtual happy hour with friends and/or family where everyone comes with their favorite hot beverage of choice, from mulled wine to hot cocoa and chamomile tea.

DIY sanctuary space: Work on creating a peaceful area at home where you can practice wellness, if you haven’t already established one. This can be a room, table, even a corner—just a place where you turn off all devices and can sit with yourself and reflect.

Virtual walk/run: To keep you moving, sign yourself up for a virtual walk or run in the fall or winter months. Not only is it great motivation to practice wellness, but you can also do it for a great cause.

Have a Happy and Safe Halloween! Ramon & Judy

2020 Skiing

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 20, 2020

Judy and I are taking to the mountains with our dog Zorro and enjoying hikes as we wait for the snow to start falling in Park City. This week we are sharing Conde Nast Traveler's article What to Expect at U.S. Ski Resorts This Winter and how mountains across the country are getting creative to keep you safe. Ski towns were among the first U.S. destinations affected by the coronavirus as the 2019-2020 season hit its stride. Now, as this year's ski season fast approaches, resorts are working hard to ensure that skiers, snowboarders, instructors, and everyone else can stay safe on and off the slopes. Ski resorts across the U.S. recently began unveiling their operating plans and we took a closer look to see just how different they will be. From planning ahead and making reservations for just about everything to big changes to the après scene as we know it, here’s what to expect at U.S. ski resorts this season.

Don’t expect day-of lift tickets - ski resorts are capping access by as much as 50 percent with walk up tickets being mostly eliminated at all 15 Alterra Mountain Company resorts (Deer Valley, Big Bear Mountain, and Winter Park among them). Most resorts are releasing a limited number of lift tickets in advance that must be purchased online or via the resort’s app. Even those who still have valid undated lift tickets saved from last year’s shortened season will need to plan ahead as many resorts are requiring mountain access reservations. While new 2020-2021 lift tickets will come with mountain access included, those with undated tickets will need to contact their resort to make a reservation.

Season passes are the golden ticket - Season pass holders get the biggest benefits all around, including unprecedented refund options, priority reservation days, and even unlimited skiing. Season pass products also offer the most flexibility this winter—important in light of constantly changing COVID-19 surges and travel restrictions. Ikon will roll the purchase price paid for an unused pass to the 2021–22 ski season, while Epic will extend a full or prorated refund depending on the reason for cancellation. But that doesn’t mean you can roll up to any lift as a season pass holder to take on the slopes. Just like with lift tickets, many season pass holders will need to book mountain access reservations in advance in order to hit the slopes.

The main disparity this season is between Vail Resorts' destinations, which are on the Epic Pass, and Alterra's Ikon Pass resorts. This season, all 33 of Vail's owned and operated U.S. resorts—including Breckenridge, Stowe—will require mountain access reservations. The thinking is that the new system will deliver consistency across its own destinations while also making it easier for skiers to plan. Epic season pass holders get an added bonus with the chance to lock in seven priority mountain access reservation dates during a passholder-only booking window (November 6–December 7). Independently operated Epic Pass partner resorts don't have to require reservations and a few are already opting out, including Telluride, Snow Basin, and Sun Valley.

Alterra Mountain Company, which operates 15 U.S. resorts with the Ikon Pass, will not require reservations across all of them. Instead, Alterra is leaving the decision to each of its mountains to decide based on the local environment. (You can find an updated list of what resorts are requiring Ikon pass reservations here.) Right now, most Ikon partner ski areas are not planning to require reservations, including Steamboat and Winter Park in Colorado; Snowbird, Solitude Mountain, and Deer Valley in Utah, and Montana's Big Sky Mountain Resort.

Regardless of the season pass you buy, be sure to check your preferred resort’s site to find out when you can start booking your 2020-2021 dates, if required. Count on reservations for everything else, too and get your phone ready for digital transactions. At minimum, expect to pay with credit cards, as many resorts, including Park City, are going entirely cashless.

Remember - Masks are at required at lifts, in lines, and in town! And, Aprés now translates to “get your group outside”. The once-wonderfully packed après ski scenes, delightfully loud bars, and cozy restaurants we love from seasons past will not look the same this winter. The saving grace is that these things are not entirely going away, but shifting towards more socially distant, outdoors options. Breakfast buffets will be a thing of the past, while new food trucks will make appearances. And sadly, the days of saddling up at the bar for a drink are over, at least for now at most resorts. You’ll still be able to hit the bar to pick up beer or wine (many bars at resorts we spoke to won’t be selling cocktails), but you’ll have to keep your party moving, either to a reserved table outside or back home to your rental condo or mountain home. Check your favorite ski resort’s site for more updates and CLICK HERE for Conde Nast Traveler's complete article.

On a high note - here are 100 Things to Look Forward to This Fall and Winter from the team at Apartment Therapy. If the chillier months approaching has you wondering what there is to do and look forward to when it’s not as nice outside, you’re not alone (especially in 2020). But there’s some great news for you: there’s plenty going on in the months of October through March—you just have to do a bit of looking.

October

Oct. 1-31: Freeform’s “31 Days of Halloween

Oct. 20-21: Orionids meteor shower

Oct. 21: CMT music awards

Oct. 21:Black-ish” season premiere on ABC

Oct. 23: Hallmark’s holiday movie kickoff

Oct. 27:This Is Us” season premiere on ABC

Oct. 29: National Cat Day (aka, another day to shower your cat with goodies)

Oct. 30:In Search of the Sanderson Sisters: A Hocus Pocus Hulaween Takeover

Oct. 30:The Mandalorian” season premiere on Disney+

Oct. 30: Sam Smith’s “Live from Abbey Road Studios” livestream performance

Oct. 31: Halloween

Oct. 31: Full Blue Moon (October’s second full moon)

Oct. 31-Nov. 2: Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead)

November

Nov. 1: Daylight Saving Time ends (aka, you gain an extra hour of sleep)

Nov. 1-30: Native American Heritage Month

Nov. 3: Election Day (vote, vote, vote!)

Nov. 14: Diwali (Festival of Light)

Nov. 15: E! People’s Choice Awards

Nov. 15:The Crown” season premiere on Netflix

Nov. 17: Take a Hike Day (so, go for that hike)

Nov. 17-18: Leonid meteor shower

Nov. 25:The Christmas Chronicles 2” movie premiere on Netflix

Nov. 26: Thanksgiving

Nov. 26:Stylish with Jenna Lyons” premiere on HBO Max

Nov. 27: Black Friday

Nov. 28: Small Business Saturday

Nov. 30: Cyber Monday

Nov. 30: Full Beaver Moon

Nov. (anytime): Friendsgiving (even though it’ll be much more distanced this year)

Dec. 1: Giving Tuesday

Dec. 1-25: Freeform’s “25 Days of Christmas”

Dec. 10-18: Hanukkah

Dec. 13-14: Geminids meteor shower

Dec. 21: Winter Solstice

Dec. 21: Crossword Puzzle Day

Dec. 21-22: Ursids meteor shower

Dec. 24: Christmas Eve

Dec. 25: Christmas Day

Dec. 26-Jan. 1: Kwanzaa

Dec. 29: Full Cold Moon

Dec. 31: New Year’s Eve

Jan. 1: New Year’s Day

Jan. 3-4: Quadrantids meteor shower

Jan. 4: National Trivia Day

Jan. 8: National Bubble Bath Day (plan accordingly!)

Jan. 10: National Houseplant Appreciate Day

Jan. 18: Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Jan. 28: Full Wolf Moon

Jan. 29: National Puzzle Day (the perfect day to do puzzles all day)

Jan. 31: Grammy Awards

Feb. 1-March 1: Black History Month

Feb. 2: Groundhog Day

Feb. 7:The Puppy Bowl” on Animal Planet

Feb. 7: Super Bowl LV

Feb. 12: Lunar New Year

Feb. 13: Galentine’s Day

Feb. 14: Valentine’s Day

Feb. 16: Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday)

Feb. 18: National Drink Wine Day

Feb. 20: National Love Your Pet Day

Feb. 27: Full Snow Moon

Feb. 28: The Golden Globe Awards

March 1: National Workout Buddy Day (grab your roomie and get to it)

March 1-31: Women’s History Month

March 1-31: National Craft Month (time to embrace the craft you love or want to try)

March 7: Critics Choice Awards

March 8: International Women’s Day

March 12: World Sleep Day

March 14: Daylight Saving Time starts (longer days, woo!)

March 14: National Pi Day (although unrelated, a great reason to eat pie)

March 17: St. Patrick’s Day

March 20: Spring Equinox

March 20: International Day of Happiness

Outdoor Living

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 13, 2020

The weather is getting cooler and Park City has even had its first dusting of snow in the mountains. This week we are looking at ways to cozy up your outdoor living spaces, how to increase your fall curb appeal, and the housing market in Park City.

Here are 5 Ways to Stage a Cozy Outdoor Space for Cooler Weather from our friends at realtor.com®.

Add a fire pit - Outdoor fireplaces or fire pits are a big win once the sun goes down and the weather cools off and a great place for s’mores.

Add plush cushions and blankets - Wrought-iron or plastic deck chairs come off as cold. Add seat cushions, outdoor pillows, and a basket of warm throws.

Add a heat lamp - Patio heaters have become one of the hottest accessories this fall as the temperature drops. Standing propane or electric heat lamps, or an infrared heating device installed on a porch ceiling, can warm up a space.

Add an all-weather rug - An extra layer on your outdoor space can cozy it up. Outdoor rugs can add something underfoot as you walk on a back deck, plus provide a pop of color to liven up the space.

Add extra lighting - Outdoor lamps aren’t going to bring in any extra warmth, but they can help with ambiance. Try glowing lanterns or Mason jars with tea lights on side tables; or tiki torches placed strategically in the yard.

Now that you have made your patio cozy, here are 5 Ways to Increase Your Curb Appeal During the Fall. Whether you are looking to list your home or just want to spruce things up it’s worth it to put a little TLC into your curb appeal.

Hire a tree service - that tree that looked lush with green leaves is going to start turning soon. And after those leaves put out their fall burst of color, you’ll be left with bare branches. A tree service can help you stay on top of those fallen leaves—and trim back any unsightly or damaged branches that may now be visible.

Try not to go overboard for Halloween - it’s better to limit your decorations so that your home appeals to more potential buyers and doesn't overwhelm your neighbors.

Take advantage of viral marketing - If you are looking to sell your home, gaining viral media is never off the table - embrace the spooky season and setting your home home apart from the rest by hiring a flash mob to do a shot-for-shot remake of “Thriller” in front of your house.

Update your plants to hardy cold-weather varieties - try plants like ornamental cabbages and kale that will give your yard instant color, while coral bells can add some texture and dimension. And as for those mums you see all over stores as soon as fall begins - the showy fall mums are great to add as quick fillers and look presentable when paired with the leafy plants.

Don’t put away your patio furniture - consider leaving it out and updating it for cooler weather activities. Tabletop heaters, fire pits, and chunky throw blankets can all be added to an outdoor space reminding potential buyers that they can get plenty of use out of your home’s yard all year round.

The Salt Lake Tribune shares that COVID-19 has wealthy buyers heading to Park City. Park City, Deer Valley and surrounding Summit and Wasatch counties are now seeing money pour into luxury homes, estates and open land with big sticker prices as the effects of the pandemic bring in new wealthy buyers. Since June, a rush to sanctuary has real estate markets booming over pre-pandemic levels for multimillion-dollar homes and properties that offer secluded access to nature and a sense of security and safety.

Droves of families who’d been waiting out the pandemic in short-term rentals or second homes in the Wasatch Mountains are now buying into more exclusive enclaves and even shifting their primary residences.Homes sales in Park City rose by 62% in July and August compared to the same time last year. Deals amounted to $446 million for those two months compared to $206 million in 2019, and September sales ran at a similar elevated pace, according to the latest data from the Park City Board of Realtors.

It’s too early to know how big or lasting these effects may be, but the phenomenon is already spurring new construction and sucking up hundreds of upscale vacation properties that often sit empty or rent on Airbnb, particularly in Summit County. Well-heeled buyers relocating to Utah are also part of a global shift toward telecommuting, one that could carry some large dollars and social implications with it. In Park City’s case, real estate agents and residents say newcomers are lured by access to a near-ubiquitous 600-trail network for hiking and biking and thousands of acres of adjacent open space. To read Tony Semerad's entire article click here.

Even the Wall Street Journal share that Home sales surge in resort towns even as Covid looms large over ski season. People are fleeing big cities amid the pandemic and are swarming mountain towns in search of more space and the great outdoors. The impetus to buy in Park City is the town’s quality of life, and for those coming from California where the pandemic and recent wildfires have made it unpleasant to go outside buyers look forward to ski season.

For years, ski resorts have worked on diversifying their attractions to bring in more people by adding all kinds of non-ski amenities. The test is this coming season, when some might not even be able to open their skiing operations. The early results are looking good, as home sales and prices have soared despite the uncertainty.

Remodeling Your Home

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 06, 2020

This week we are looking at remodels to help sell your home as well as local art news and fun. When you place your home on the market the hope is that it will sell quickly as the longer a home is on the market the greater chance the price will go down. This week we are sharing 3 Renovations That Can Help You Sell Your Home Faster to help make sure your remodeling budget has the biggest payoff.

Kitchen - A dated kitchen is one of the biggest turnoffs for potential homebuyers. A kitchen that's been renovated using quality materials often draws people in and causes them to overlook other potential flaws. Quality finishes in the kitchen are crucial, as many buyers at all price points are looking for granite countertops (or something similar) and tile backsplashes. The cabinets should also be of decent quality and a neutral color that appeals to a wide range of people.

Roof- Since a roof is rarely seen except when you're coming and going, it might not seem like the best place to spend your renovation dollars; however, if you can state on your home's listing that the roof was recently replaced, you may gain more interest, potentially helping you to sell your home more quickly. Also, make sure that the color of the shingles matches the character of the home so buyers aren't turned off the moment they approach your house.

Bathroom - Moving back inside, a bathroom renovation is a great way to maximize the effectiveness of your remodeling budget. Adding unique features such as a tile tub surround or a designer light fixture that'll help your home stand out from others in your area. Again, quality installation is important here, as you don't want to put the future homeowners at risk of a major water leak.

Local Art - Now through October 11th the public can vote for Park City in the World Wildlife Fund’s We Love Cities challenge to celebrate Park City's Leadership in sustainability and climate action.

Residents and visitors can visit Recycle Utah, Park City Library and the PC MARC to take photos of interactive art backdrops created by local artists Adrianna Allegretti, Anna Leigh Moore, Elaine Lee and Emily Quinn Loughlin and post them on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #WeLoveParkCity. People can also log votes by visiting welovecities.org/park-city, she said. To find out more, check out the Park Record article here.


Local Fun - This time of year is usually known as shoulder season, but even in an unprecedented 2020 their is fun to be had in Park City at a distance. Check out Park City Magazine's full article here.

Bike Longer & Ski Sooner - Woodward is the relative newcomer in town, but the resort is already making its mark on Park City shoulder season opening new terrain and planning to keep the lifts spinning October 18. Just this week they unveiled a brand-new bike trail, EZPZ, which features a host of creative line choices and unique wood features suitable for a wide range of rider types from beginners to experts. Woodward is shooting for a start date of November 13 for skiing and snowboarding.

Eat More & Spend Less - The Park City Dine About is back for the eighth year running. The annual event, hosted by the Park City Area Restaurant Association (PCARA), is taking place between October 1-18 with dining deals at some of Park City’s best restaurants. Two-course lunches can be had for $10-$15 per person, while three-course dinners are $20-$40. Those who aren’t Park City locals can take advantage of lodging specials through PCARA lodging partner Stay Park City. Click here to book your stay, and visit the PCARA website here to learn more about participating restaurants.

Read more of our community coverage here.

Fall Curb Appeal

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 30, 2020

A good-looking front door is everything. And one of the easiest ways to punch up your curb appeal is by adding in some fresh new greenery to your plant containers when the seasons change. What flowers fare best in the cooler weather and are also eye-catching enough to be front-door worthy? Here are seven fall plants for your front door - 7 Front Door Plants to Give Your Home Fall Curb Appeal.

Chrysanthemums - These fall bloomers are the perfect addition to your fall arrangements. Chrysanthemums love a good sunny spot and therefore require a pretty regular watering routine (every other day or whenever the soil is dry). Keep in mind - Chrysanthemums are toxic to dogs and cats.

Heucheras - (also known as Coral Bells) are perfect for adding a pop of color to your fall arrangements. They are also more shade-tolerant, so they would do nicely under a covered porch.

Ornamental grasses  - grasses are a great way to break up the texture in your containers since they come in such a variety of colors (bronze, blue, green) and forms (stiff and upright or whimsical and arching).

Pansies and violas - they will not only look beautiful in fall, but they’ll also last throughout the winter and re-bloom in the spring. And they come in such a broad spectrum of colors, you’ll be able to style your arrangement to match (or purposefully contrast) your front door. Pansies and violas like full to part sun and regular watering.

Snapdragons - like pansies and violas, snapdragons will also last through the winter and re-bloom in the spring when the temperatures start to warm up. Snapdragons are non-toxic to animals. They are happy in a good sunny spot as well as a shadier one. They prefer to have their soil kept moist (but not too moist).

Ornamental kale and cabbage - There are many varieties that run in the white to green to purple range, but it’s the rigid-yet-fringy texture that really stands out and they also come in a range of shapes and sizes, so getting creative with these is very easy. Your ornamental kale and cabbage will appreciate full sun and moist soil.

Herbs - the earthy textures and smells really bring an arrangement to life. Different types of herbs have different light and watering needs, although most will do well in full to partial sun with regular watering.

Some things to consider when it comes to front door plants: how much light your front door area gets, as well as your access to water. Will your plants be protected from strong, damaging winds? Do you have sturdy planters for your fall flower arrangements? Check out Apartment Therapy for the full article.

Looking to the interior of your home here are - 7 Finishes and Materials That’ll Impact Your Resale Value, According to Experts by Apartment Therapy. If you’re gearing up to renovate your house, you might be pondering which materials and finishes will pay off the most in the long run. Investing in high-quality and timeless materials will eventually help the resale value of your home when it’s time to move out. Choosing those materials can be difficult, especially since those renovating their homes probably aren’t considering that they might want to renovate again in 10 years if their design choices didn’t age well. 

Engineered hardwood floors - believe it or not, real hardwood isn’t always the best way to go. In fact, real hardwood floors might even hinder your ability to find a buyer.

Quartz countertops - stain resistant, durable, and don’t harbor bacteria or viruses. Quartz countertops impact value in a major way, adding elegance and a timeless look, while providing long-lasting value and durability.

Marble floors - certainly a more expensive material than its other natural stone or ceramic tile counterparts, but the price that’s paid up front will pay off in the long run. Plus, when selected and installed correctly, marble flooring will last decades.

Carpeting - Sellers will replace old carpet with new carpet thinking that will help them sell a home, but buyers prefer hardwood. For this reason, it might be best to consider if it’s worth the money to re-carpet a room as you’re getting your house ready to sell. It might make more sense to spend a little extra money on a different material for your floors.

Plastic fixtures - It’s best to put a little more money into your plumbing sooner rather than later in order to avoid flushing more money down the drain later on.

Oak millwork - a nice contrast to the white modern look and adds warmth to the space is high-end wallpaper is a more economical solution that can create a similar warmth and environment.

Wallpaper - homeowners often want to feel as though their personality is visible in their design. Avoid busy wallpaper. Less is more during a renovation.

Have a great week - stay well. Ramon and Judy

Fall Updates

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 23, 2020

Fall is here and Park City is full of amazing color. This week we look at the new SLC airport terminal, Utah's economy, and the end of walk up ticket sales at some of the local ski resorts.

Utah's economy is ranked the best in the nation during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to 24/7 Wall Street, a website that analyzes and reports on economic data according to Fox13 - Salt Lake City.

Fox13 reports that Utah's low unemployment rate when compared to the rest of the country as one of the reasons the state is in the first position. While the rest of the country has seen unemployment rates reach double digits, Utah had the lowest unemployment rate in the country for the month of July, and currently, 4.5 percent of workers filed for unemployment.The site also stated that Utah's economic growth is one of the strongest in any state in the country, even before the pandemic hit. Utah also has a low poverty rate, being one of only seven states with less than 10-percent of the population below the poverty line.

Salt Lake City International Airport is undergoing a $4.1 billion renovation project, according to USA Today. Concourse A is part of the first phase of the renovation project, while the second concourse is set to open in October, and the rest of the rest of the new airport is scheduled to be completed by 2024, added the report. The US carrier says the airport’s new Salt Lake City Airport includes convenient amenities designed to enhance the overall travel experience. Last week, Delta flew its first flight out of the new Salt Lake City International Airport, which underwent a billion-dollar renovation recently, on Tuesday. The debut flight departed for Atlanta from the airport’s new 900,000-square-foot Concourse A.“This day has been years in the making,” said Bill Wyatt, executive director of Salt Lake City Department of Airports. “To say we are excited to be here today is an understatement. After six years of construction and many more years of planning, we are proud to open the first new US hub airport in the 21st century.” Read more about the new Salt Lake City airport on Business Traveler's site.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that Solitude Mountain Resort and Deer Valley Resort have become the latest Utah ski areas to take walk-up tickets off their menus. Both resorts are owned by the Alterra Mountain Co., which on Monday revealed some of the COVID-19 precautions it would implement across its 15 destinations throughout the United States and Canada. In addition to ending walk-up tickets, Alterra will put caps on daily lift tickets — sold online — and prioritize season-pass holders. Resorts are also creating more grab-and-go food options and more outdoor seating to encourage social distancing and will be limiting interactions on lifts and gondolas.

Deer Valley has long capped the number of skiers it allows daily. Solitude, on the other hand, has been seeing a noticeable influx of visitors since joining the Alterra family prior to the 2018-19 season. Solitude will not turn away season-pass holders but will limit sales of online, single-day lift tickets if large crowds are anticipated. The protocols apply only to resorts owned by Alterra and not those on its Ikon Pass, one of the two major multi-resort season passes on the market. Brighton, Snowbird and Alta — all of which allow limited days to Ikon Pass holders — are in the process of creating their own COVID-19 regulations.

Vail Resorts announced similar changes two weeks ago, including at Utah’s Park City Mountain Resort. In addition to ending walk-up lift tickets and prioritizing season pass holders, Vail will limit chairlifts to riders who are within the same ski party or to small groups of individuals. Perhaps most ground shaking is its plan to limit capacity by requiring all visitors, even season pass holders, to use an online reservation system to hold their spot on the mountain.

Solitude is slated to open the season Nov. 20, Alta plans to follow Nov. 21 and Deer Valley is scheduled for Dec. 5. Snowbird and Brighton have not announced their opening days.

Featured Properties

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 16, 2020

This week we are showcasing a few of our featured properties, please let us know if you have any questions or would like more information. Have a wonderful week.

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This lot is located on an EYE-BROW of Glenwild Drive to provide privacy and safety, with golf, mountain and ski views right next to common land. The Glenwild Golf Course has been rated number one by Golf Digest since 2002 for Private Clubs in Utah and you may join the private club as a golfer or as a social member, or not at all. Glenwild is a gated community ideally located 9 Miles from Park City Old Town, and 33 minutes to SLC International Airport, and of course only a few minutes to the Park City's highly ranked ski resorts.

Vacant Land in Glenwild 18 - 0.89 acres Park City, UT 84098 - CLICK HERE to see more.

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Homeowners and architectural enthusiasts will appreciate the use of light, flow, vistas and even acoustics in every space of this efficient and thoughtfully designed home. Floor to ceiling windows overlook 780+ acres of Toll Canyon green space, invite the outdoors inside with automated moving glass walls opening to a private shaded patio/deck with water-feature and breathtaking views. Automated screens ensure uninvited guests won't crash your party. Maintaining a light footprint, a NERVE exclusive DC lighting system runs cooler with long-life LED's, indirect LEDs highlighting elegant architectural features. Nature provides 4 seasons of comfort with integrated passive solar warming on sunny winter days; and automated solar shades reduce heat in the summer. Lower-level walkout invites you on journey through the Route 66 themed Arcade. Next enter virtual reality in the NERVE golf / sport / racing simulator. (available to purchase) From playground to world-class cinema; experience the 25 seat private theater boasting a 20ft 4K HDR image, a 27 speaker Dolby Atmos system & D-Box Motion. Drawing on decades of experience, the REPOSE team enhances your lifestyle through fully automated smart homes that are timeless in design, style, and always trendsetting. Greater than the sum of its parts, a REPOSE lifestyle build emanates energy efficiency, serenity, relaxation and comfort.Call Ramon for your very own private tour of this extraordinary new home and be prepared to be WOWED!

Single Family Home in Pinebrook Park City, UT 84098: 7 bedrooms, 8.00 bathrooms - 8549 square feet on 0.80 acres. CLICK HERE for more information and pictures.

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This beautiful home with views of all three ski-resorts, the Uinta's and the valley. Owners will enjoy top-of-the-line appliances, dramatic floor to-ceiling stone fireplaces, radiant heat, Space Pac air conditioning, wine cellar and cigar room- reclaimed barn wood floors, floor to ceiling custom library, 2 outdoor fountains, even an espresso machine installed just for guests on the lower level and this is just to name a few of the incredible features this home affords. Conveniently positioned off the master suite is a study-office, which could be also used as a nursery. This is the perfect retreat to unwind with some of the most amazing scenery, Creston music system, vantage lighting system, new restained exterior, alarm and lots of storage.

Single Family Home in Glenwild 18 Park City, UT 84098: 5 bedrooms, 8.00 bathrooms, 7909 square feet on 11.05 acres. CLICK HERE to see the 3D tour.

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Review the plans for this gorgeous Mountain Contemporary Home Designed by Otto Walker Architects, which captures the beauty of Glenwild Golf Course and Park City Ski Mountain all in one exceptionally planned home. This custom home to be built specifically for you, construction to start after you meet with the builder once the owner is under contract. The home offers main floor living with floor to ceiling windows, large game/family room. This home was Meticulously planned out in every detail, from how the rooms capture the views, to how the home flows from room to room...the great room and kitchen area are simply great for families and guest entertaining. The family room is just magnificent in every detail from the bar to the overhead glass catwalk and gorgeous fireplace and of course floor to ceiling windows.

Single Family Home in Glenwild 18 Park City, UT 84098: 5 bedrooms, 7.00 bathrooms, 7807 square feet on 1.09 acres. CLICK HERE for more information and photos.

Snow In Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 09, 2020

The first snow fall in Park City was only a light dusting, but with cooler temperatures on the horizon we are excited for Fall. This leads us to - Great News! Park City is planning to open on November 20th and is shooting to be open everyday this winter. Of course many safety precautions will be in place to ensure a fun and safe season.  Read more about their winter operating plan here. 

Park City is full of events and activities - here are a few of the local events happening this week. Park City Film, Dragonfli Media Technologies and the Utah Olympic Park continue their Twilight Drive-In at the Utah Olympic Park this Friday, September 11th at 7:30 pm and Saturday, September 12th at 7:45 pm. Friday's film will be "Up' rated G and Saturday's film will be "Caddyshack" rated R. Tickets are $30 per car - for more information visit parkcityfilm.org and utaholympiclegacy.org/park-events.

Looking to stretch your legs - The Park City Museum is hosting guided walking tours every Thursday and Friday at 2 pm. Tickets are $10 each and tours are appropriate for those 13 and older. The tours last an hour and a half and an optional $22 ticket price gains you access to the Park City Museum. The tour groups meet in front of Grappa Restaurant - 151 Main Street. For information on tickets visit parkcityhistory.org .

Help the community - Recycle Utah, Summit LAnd Conservancy and Park City Municipal are planning a special project for this year's National Day of Service on Friday, September 11th. The cost is free, but sign-ups are appreciated via Sign Up Genius. Meet up spots are at the Park City Bandstand, 1354 Park Avenue and along the Rail Trail behind White Pine Touring, 1970 Bonanza Drive.

Visit Park City is a wonderful resource for events happening in and around the Park City area. As Summit County and Park City continue to be in a low-risk phase - Park City asks that all residents and visitors follow social distancing protocols including the new health order mandating the use of face coverings/masks in a variety of public locations. Park City restaurants, bars, hotels, and recreational areas are still open and following safe business practices to protect the health and welfare of our guests and staff. For details please visit the travel update page on Visit Park City's website.

Have a great week, Ramon and Judy

Home Updates

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 02, 2020

This week we are looking at mudroom updates and things to check when you are buying a home - whether it is your first home or fifth home. Before we get into our weekly blog we wanted to share that Visit Park City is a great site to see what is happening in and around Park City. Summit County and Park City continue to be in a low-risk phase and our town asks that all residents and visitors follow social distancing protocols including the mandating the use of face coverings/masks in a variety of public locations. Park City restaurants, bars, hotels, and recreational areas are still open and following safe business practices to protect the health and welfare of our guests and staff.

Having a place like a mudroom to sanitize before heading inside is also high on buyers’ wish lists thanks to the coronavirus pandemic.) Here are 6 Mudroom Mistakes That Might Be Costing You a Sale, According to Experts by Wendy Helfenbaum.

Things that don’t belong there have piled up - don't make your mudroom a catch-all.

Fast fix: Mudrooms are transitions between outside and inside the home, so think about what you need to accomplish here, and then clear out the room. Common functions include storage for shoes, jackets, school backpacks, hats, purses, towels (if you have a pool) and bags.

The room is serving multiple purposes, but nothing’s clearly defined - Few homeowners can devote an entire room to jackets and boots, it’s important to establish functional zones.

Fast fix: Install cabinets for pantry items and a tall tower or wall hooks for brooms to help keep organized and add a deep work sink. Remember that you’re showing buyers how they can use the space to add organization to their day-to-day living.

You have too much open storage - Sure, hooks are awesome, but must we see every. single. thing.

Fast fix: Hide as much clutter as possible, get lockers or cubbies for each family member with doors that close or get built-ins made. If they get untidy inside, no one can see it.

There’s nowhere to sit down - getting out is simpler when you’re not balancing on one foot.

Fast fix: Benches are a beautiful thing that also add hidden storage.

You’ve forgotten about furry family members - ideally their belongings should be stored in the mudroom so buyers who aren’t pet lovers won’t be turned off by messy dog or cat dishes on your kitchen floor.

Fast fix: Keep their food, water, treats and even their bed in the mudroom, if space allows add a low bath or shower for dogs, too.

It doesn’t match the rest of your house - Your mudroom shouldn’t be an afterthought.

Fast fix: Give the mudroom a fresh coat of paint that coordinates with the rest of your home. And don’t forget good lighting.

Looking to buy your first home or know someone who is - here are 7 Things I Regret Not Checking on Before I Bought My First House by Jennifer Billock. Here are a few things to watch for when making a first home purchase.

From the windows… Make sure all the windows open and close properly and are in good condition. This is especially important in the wintertime in colder climates. When people tend to keep windows closed all the time, it’s easier to forget to check if they’re functional.

To the walls - Beware of wallpapered homes. If you don’t want wallpaper, you’ll have to spend a ton of time removing it. Also, be mindful of how high the ceilings are. You may love cathedral-height walls, but it’s going to cost a lot to air condition and heat the space.

And also to the floors - Especially if the home you’re buying is old, check the floors. You want them to be stable without any softness or bounce to them that could indicate a larger problem. The floor might be damaged underneath rugs and furniture as well, so don’t feel bad about asking someone to check or lifting up the edge of a rug yourself.

Water issues - Water damage is sneaky and can show up places you don’t expect - look up at the corners and edges where the wall and ceilings meet, and do that in closets as well. Also look for water damage under sinks, around radiators, among the plumbing, on wood beams, around gutters, or anywhere else water might cause damage. And then check the water pressure in the sinks, tubs, showers, and hoses to ensure it’s all in working order.

Electrical work - It’s always important to check the electrical panel to make sure the electric has been recently updated.

Structural problems - this includes the roof, the walls, supporting beams, and the basement. Check for cracks, sagging spots, missing shingles, and water leakage around the foundation of the home.

The neighborhood - It’s not in the house, but make sure to check out the surrounding neighborhood, potential loud neighbors, rush hour traffice and how far it is to a grocery store.

Staying Safe On The Trail

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 25, 2020

Park City’s 400 miles of trails are a tremendous recreational outlet, they also crisscross wildlife habitats and migration corridors. Jane Gendron shares Tips for staying safe and protecting Summit County’s resident animal friends in the Summer/Fall 2020 issue of Park City Magazine. Just around the next switchback could be a moose, deer, elk, or fox—maybe even a black bear, bobcat, or cougar - what do you do when you encounter wildlife on the trail? Here are tips on what to do if you’re lucky enough to meet a wild animal in its native habitat.

Most animals don’t want to engage with humans, so make them aware of your presence. Always make noise when hiking or biking, and slow your roll around blind turns in the trail. As Scott Root of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources says, “Never approach or try to touch wildlife.... And don’t ever feed wildlife.” For more information, visit wildawareutah.org.

When you meet a moose: Give moose ample space (at least 25 yards) and leash dogs immediately, as a curious canine can anger an otherwise unperturbed animal. The most aggressive moose tend to be a cow moose with a calf. Don’t try to outrun a charging moose - they can run up to 35 mph; look around and see what you can get behind to separate you and the moose, such as a tree or boulder.

When you meet a mountain lion or cougar: Stop, pick up small children and pets, make yourself look big, and slowly back away. No matter how scared you may be, do not run (you don’t want to trigger that prey-chasing instinct). In the rare case that the cougar won’t back down, throw rocks or other objects to scare it off.

When you meet a black bear: Stand your ground (don’t run or scale a tree), keep calm, and give the bear the opportunity to skedaddle on its own. If a bear attacks, fight back.

When you meet a coyote: Keep your pets close, make noise, and do not run. While making yourself look as big as possible, back away slowly. If necessary, throw rocks or other objects to frighten it away.

When you meet an elk: Give elk, and deer of any species (mule deer are most common locally), at least 25 yards of breathing room. Though elk are unlikely to charge, during the fall “rut” (mating season), males can become aggressive. If one charges, get behind a tree, boulder, or something else solid.

UPDATES FOR THE HOME: After months of quarantine, living spaces are becoming multifunctional - Apartment Therapy shares 6 Up-and-Coming Bedroom Trends Real Estate Agents Love Seeing.

Bedrooms doubling as office spaces - with more people working from home during the pandemic—and likely to continue to going forward—the bedroom can serve as a nice and quiet place to work, Blacker says. “Buyers like to envision how they are going to live in a home, so when you have a work-from-home spot already built in, they can much easily picture themselves living there and working from home.”

Bedrooms doubling as wellness spaces - Don’t want to sleep where you work - try a wellness space with a yoga mat and plants. Some are carving out a fitness space in their rooms with free weights, resistance bands and balance balls. ”

Integrated headboards - show homes for new construction developments often showcase integrated headboards with lighting, often with small task lighting or ambient lights, and are usually connected to the smart home system.

Live, not artificial, plants in the bedroom - adding live, air-purifying plants to the bedroom makes sense as people are spending more time at home and want their bedrooms to feel like a peaceful, clean oasis.

Mixed textures - like wood, fabric, metals, and glass—with a neutral color palette is a trend with matching furniture pieces that look like a set. The trend has staying power because it’s flexible allows and transitions if they move to a home with a different architectural style.

Balconies - after spending months in quarantine, apartment renters and homeowners alike are prioritizing bedroom balconies. This extra space is very appealing to buyers and can add value to a home.

We are on an upgrade roll - here are 7 Timeless Bathroom Upgrades You Won’t Regret in Five Years, According to Pros by Maria C. Hunt with Apartment Therapy. To help decide if your upgrade investments will stand the test of time, top interior designers across the country have shared their tips on the wisest ways to invest when it comes to renovating your bathroom.

Go frameless for the shower - A clunky feature of older shower enclosures is the metal strip that runs around the edges. If you’re updating your shower, leave off the metal frame.

Install an LED mirror - vanity mirrors with LED lights built into the frame add a great clean look for a more modern bath, and it has a feel of sophisticated luxury like you would find in an upscale hotel.

Do a riff on classic subway tile - subway tile is a timeless and traditional choice for the bath and instead of being laid in the horizontal brick pattern, try them stacked or turned on their side vertically.

Add a freestanding tub - the original style of tub since the invention of bathing and you can't go wrong with this statement piece.

Choose a warmer white - off white is more interesting than bright white and it’s not as stark, it feels more forgiving.

Put your tub inside your shower - add a spa-like element to your bathroom by placing the tub inside an extra-large shower enclosure.

Upgrade your shower tile enclosure - little changes to your shower tile can be life-changing: add a little 3 x 3 outcropping or a tiny niche at ankle height so you have a place to rest your foot while shaving in the shower, make the niche to hold your soap and shampoo or add a shelf.

Thinking of Skiing

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 19, 2020

RamonThe weather in Utah has been particularly hot lately, which makes me think of skiing and snow boarding of course. Did you know that Park City, Utah might of had the most unique (and unpractical) ski lift EVER. Matt Lorelli of Unofficial Networks share this article posted in the New York Times on December 13, 1964 sharing details of Park City’s “Skier’s Subway” used to transport skiers through old mining shafts. Check out this incredible footage and first-hand depictions of the Skier’s Subway. I know skiers will get creative for turns, but this is taking it to the next level. The Skier’s Subway didn’t last long, and closed in 1969. The entire journey ended up taking close to an hour, if everything worked properly. The Park City Museum claims that most skiers treated the subway as a novelty and returned to more traditional lifts after one ride.
Still thinking of heat we wanted to share Apartment Therapy's 50 Things to Do at Home in the Summer That Don’t Require Any Outdoor Space. Even though we have miles of wonderful trails and fresh air in Park City, sometimes it is still nice to stay inside as we all keep a little distance.

1. Start an Indoor Herb Garden - if you have a window, you can do that inside. And even if you don’t have good light, there are at-home garden solutions for that, too.

2. Make Over Your Entire Wardrobe - this is actually a great (and productive) way to spend time. Take everything out of your closet and be honest about what you actually need to keep, then donate the rest.

3. Find a New Workout Routine - instead of putting yourself on an at-home workout schedule you hate, make it a goal to try a new, different DIY workout each week. YouTube is great for this.

4. Make a TBR Pile and Commit To It - make (“to be read”) pile for the rest of the summer. Go through the books one by one and donate the ones you know you won’t read again.

5. Start a Virtual Book Club - Gather friends on a video call every few weeks and talk about books, life, or anything in between. It’ll inspire you to read and get you to socialize creatively.

6. Create a DIY Cooking Competition - Choose an ingredient or a flavor category and compare recipes at the end of the evening. The prize can be anything you want!

7. Perfect Your Favorite Recipe - Whatever it is, challenge yourself to perfect making it yourself—no matter how many tries it takes.

8. …Or Work Through an Entire Cookbook - choose a favorite cookbook and commit to making every single recipe in it by the end of the summer.

9. Start a Journal  - Odds are, one day you’ll want to look back on it and see exactly what you were doing, thinking, and feeling.

10. Develop One New Daily Routine - Identify the most unpleasant part of your daily routine and make it better. Try changing your annoying alarm clock out for something more pleasant, or investing in a new workout tool that will improve your exercise routine.

11. Makeover an Entire Room For $0 - Challenge yourself to make it into something better with no money at all. Spending just a few hours of concentrated effort on a room (instead of avoiding it) can make all the difference.

12. Sit Down and Take a “Life Inventory” - Write down a handful of life categories that are important to you (like family, friends, travel, finance, or health) and list some ways you can improve upon the most frustrating parts. Set goals.

13. Create an At-Home Movie Theater - String Christmas lights up, pop some popcorn, order all those weird snacks you only eat at movie theaters.

14. Recreate Your Favorite Date Nights At Home  - Whatever it is, there are ways to do it at home. For example, you can take a virtual tour of a new museum exhibit or take a virtual cooking class together.

15. Create a Documentary Club - Create a list of intriguing and thought-provoking documentaries and host a virtual club where you and a few others get together and discuss the films.

16. Learn a New Language - You might not be able to go there right now, but you can at least use the extra time to learn a few key phrases (or more than that, if you’re feeling ambitious) to use when you do go there.

17. Organize Your Fridge or Pantry Once and For All - Invest in a few affordable storage solutions and create the dream fridge or pantry you’ve always wanted. And if you don’t want to spend any money, then get creative.

18. Switch Up One Space in Your House Entirely - Make your guest bedroom the office or your main bedroom the guest bedroom. Move your dining room to your living area.

19. Find a Pen Pal - Whether it’s someone you’re dating, an old friend, or a distant relative, find yourself a summer pen pal. Just think of how interesting the contents of those summer 2020 letters will be to look back on in 10 years!

20. Start Something From Scratch - When’s the last time you started something from scratch? This can be a recipe, or a brand new arts and crafts project, or anything at all.

Click here to read all 50 ideas - have fun!

Luxury Travel Magazine shares the summer activities still happening at The St. Regis Deer Valley (SRDV).  Hotel guests are returning for the Resort's many exciting outdoor activities including hiking for all levels with trailheads on the property; mountain biking on Park City’s 325 miles of trails; Blue Ribbon trout fishing; golfing at outstanding nearby courses with tee times scheduled by the St. Regis Concierge; touring Park City's historic Main Street, lined with award-winning restaurants, pubs, boutiques and galleries; enjoying a world-class luge run (yes, even in summer) at Utah Olympic Park; horseback riding; relaxing at the Resort’s two-tier infinity pool or working out at the state-of-the-art Athletic Club.  Guests can also indulge their senses at the Resort’s Remède Spa in its pristine and relaxing private treatment rooms.

The Resort's family activities include Geocache Treasure Hunts, an exciting and captivating journey for children and adults alike, taking guests through the trails of Wasatch Valley in search of buried treasure; and the daily S’mores Tradition and the Champagne Sabering Tradition. The Resort's four outstanding dining venues are open with generously distanced seating.

RIME at The St. Regis Deer Valley is open daily 7:00 AM-9:30 PM.

Mountain Terrace is open daily from 11:00 AM-3:30 PM and 4:30 PM-9:00 PM.

Brasserie 7452 is open daily from 11:00 AM-3:30 PM and 4:30 PM-9:00 PM.

The St. Regis Bar & Lounge is open daily from 11:00 AM-3:30 PM and 4:30 PM-9:00 PM.

Sprucing Up Your Home

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 12, 2020

This week we are looking at how to spruce up your bedrooms and living room for potential buyers. Even if you are not looking to sell at this moment, these tips can brighten and lighten your mood. Do you have an empty wall in need of some love, check out What’s New on Park City’s Gallery Scene with Park City Magazine. Park City’s art scene is gaining global momentum, especially with a few new galleries on the proverbial block. Before summer ends, take time out to stroll around and enjoy all this colorful town has to offer. The Park City Gallery Association continues to host the monthly stroll from 6-9 pm on the last Friday of each month—with social distancing protocols in place; currently, masks are required indoors in Summit County. Visit pop-up gallery, CREATE PC (825 Main St), rotating work from local artists and doubling as a cooperative artist studio and retail gallery.

Are the bedrooms in your home putting potential buyers to sleep—and not in a good way? Here are 4 Bedroom Mistakes to Avoid When Selling Your House, according to Wendy and the Team at Apartment Therapy. From nurseries to kids’ rooms, guest bedrooms and main suites, it’s important to showcase sleeping areas as relaxing refuges from everyday life. Here’s how to transform these spaces so buyers can picture themselves having sweet dreams in your house.

Your bedroom is the designated dumping ground - Put a hand up if your bedroom features things like: abandoned exercise equipment, a “home office” corner that’s really a folding table strewn with papers and an outdated desktop computer, piles of clean laundry you haven’t had time to fold, or tired bedding from when you first moved in. Ditch the clutter and attract buyers with a commanding focal point, like an awesome headboard or accent wall. Low-profile bed frames can help make a room feel bigger. You also shouldn’t shower or use the ensuite restroom within a few hours before an open house so they can be show-ready.

Your nursery doesn’t deliver - Just because a baby sleeps here doesn’t mean this bedroom should look cramped and boring. Stick to gender-neutral paint colors and steer clear of decals on the walls, which can feel cumbersome and permanent. Buyers who don’t have children might want an office or TV room instead of a nursery, so appeal to the space’s potential by tricking the eye into thinking it’s bigger.

Your kids’ bedrooms look like a kaleidoscope - If your child’s room contains several toppling towers of toys, buyers will assume your house doesn’t have adequate storage. That means stashing games, stuffed animals and toys in baskets that can be stacked in the closet. Limit furniture, and avoid bright colors like hot pink and lime green too.

Your guest room has no glam factor - It’s natural to want your in-laws to have plenty of space if they’re restless sleepers, but cramming in a bed that’s too large for the room is a big no-no. Less is more, so organize and purge any unnecessary household items, and use all-white bedding, which is easy to clean and looks inviting. In all bedrooms, avoid staging the bed against a window; have room to walk on either side.

Your bedrooms are not the only thing buyers are looking at, here Antonia DeBianchi shares 6 Tricks Home Stagers Use to Make Your Living Room Feel Way Bigger. If you love entertaining, a cramped living room can put a damper on your hosting plans.Even though it can feel impossible, there are ways to maximize space in a small living room. While you’re spending extra time at home these days, take a minute to employ these home stager-approved tricks to make your living room look bigger.

Spring for a large area rug - A small rug in the middle of the room makes a tight space feel smaller. Keep it with a five-inch border around the room and keep the pattern simple with a seagrass or stripe pattern. Anything too busy will cause mental clutter.

Trick your windows into looking taller - Curtains will heighten the room and make the whole room look bigger. Depending on ceiling height, always mount your curtains above the casing or molding—never on them. Take your window game one notch further by mounting a mirror across from it. Its reflection will open up the room as if there’s another window.

Ditch lighter paint swatches  - If you thought lighter colors made rooms look bigger, think again. Darker colors like navy blue add depth to a living room and make it come alive. Balance the dark walls with neutral-light upholstery. If you’re not ready to take the leap, experiment with an accent wall.

Think vertically with wall shelving - Using hanging wall shelves or bookshelves reduces floor clutter. But be wary of overcrowding. If you’re filling [the shelf] up with books, make sure you’re breaking it up and putting in some accessories and matching baskets can hide all your storage while still looking neat.

Reduce furniture—and buy proportional pieces - Minimizing furniture is key. Hiding an ottoman under a coffee table or bringing in chairs from your office when you need extra seating helps make way for necessary furniture. To make a less obstructive walkway try investing in coffee tables with softened curves. And as for patterns, the more simple the upholstery, the bigger the room will feel.

Invest in lots of lighting - Make sure that you have ambient lighting, put a lamp in the corner to compliment overhead lighting.

Stay well and have a great week.

Camping and Cocktails

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 05, 2020

Judy and I enjoy camping and wanted to share a great article by Adventure Mom for Ski Utah in Camping at Utah's Ski Resorts. There are several ski resorts in the Utah area that provide camping opportunities for those who would like to spend time outdoors while enjoying nature and the stunning scenery. Check out the following resorts for an experience of a lifetime.

Beaver Mountain, located in Garden City, Utah, is a popular place for skiers and camping enthusiasts alike. Many choose to visit Beaver Mountain because of its beautiful scenery and all that is offered to them, including a spacious RV park with access to fire pits and large picnic tables, campsites for those who want to sleep in tents, and even lodges for those who prefer staying indoors. Amenities includes shower/restroom facilites, OHV trails, full service 30 amp hookups, free WiFi and much more. Bear Lake is a short 20 minute drive from Beaver Mountain and offers water sports activities and famous raspberry milkshakes. Make sure to complete your reservations in advance.

Alta Ski Area, just outside Salt Lake City, is one of Utah’s most scenic ski resorts that offer camping. Many amazing hikes to lakes and viewpoints can be found near the Albion Basin Campground as well as some mountain bike trails. The Albion Basin Campground is where all of the fun camping takes place in the summer months. In order to book with the Albion Basin Campground, you’ll need to go to Recreation.gov. Please remember dogs are not allowed in Little Cottonwood Canyon, a protected watershed area. In addition to camping, numerous lodging options are also available. You can book your reservation at one of several spots open for summer or simply visit them for a night off of cooking by the campfire.

The Redman Campground between Brighton and Solitude Mountain Resort is just a few miles up Big Cottonwood Canyon. There is much to do and see in the area, such as fishing and hiking. The area is known for its scenic views and a massive elevation of 8,300 feet. In addition to going on hikes and fishing, guests may enjoy riding bikes on the trail while exploring the area and taking photos of nature’s beauty and the amazing wildflowers during peak summer months. Plan to leave your furry friends behind on this trip — dogs are not allowed in Big Cottonwood Canyon, a protected watershed area. Reservations for the campground are available and you can bring a tent or your RV to camp here.

The Spruces Campground, located on Big Cottonwood Canyon Road in Salt Lake City, Utah, is a kid-friendly spot with an elevation of approximately 7,500 feet. Make sure you make plans to leave the pups behind for this one, too — Spruces is part of the Big Cottonwood Canyon protected watershed area. It is the perfect spot for those looking for a comfortable and convenient place to set up a tent or park their RV for a camping extravaganza. There is plenty of space available for RVs to park next to tents. Guests can book a reservation for as low as $26 per night.

The Mount Timpanogos Campground at Sundance Mountain Resort is well-known for its surrounding beauty because it is in the Wasatch Mountains in Utah County, Utah. It is a great place to visit when you want to experience a stunning scenic view surrounded by aspen and fir trees. Those who come to the campground will often have picnics, go on hikes, ride their bikes on the trails and even indulge in activities at Sundance Mountain Resort just down the road. It is a great spot for those camping in RVs and tents. Its recreation sites are standard non-electric and RV non-electric. Activities at Sundance during the summer include scenic chairlift rides, zipline, horseback riding, fly fishing, art classes, music and more. Guests can make reservations online. A stay at the campground will cost as low as $24 per night. If you’d like to reserve a campsite call 1-877-444-6777 or you can click here to make those reservations on-line.

While you are out camping make sure to check out the stars. If you are up for a road trip, her are Bradley O'Neill's Best Places in the U.S. to See the Stars. Here’s Discover Blog's list of the best locations for stargazing in the US. They range from the solitude of US National Historical Parks to towns, cities and historical places that are members of the International Dark Sky Places.

Chaco Culture National Historical Park, New Mexico - This remote park is a prehistoric archaeological site and on clear nights you can appreciate the starry skies as our ancestors did thousands of years ago. The Chaco Night Sky Program runs between April and October and features astronomy workshops for everyone from school children to astronomers.

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah - One of the things that will instantly grab your attention upon arrival to Bryce Canyon is how dry and pollution free the air is. This combination makes it among the darkest places in the country. The week of and prior to the new moon are the best times, but thousands of stars still twinkle on moonless nights. Check the Astronomy and Night Sky Programs for events.

Devil’s Tower National Monument, Wyoming- The landscapes of Devil's Tower are as ethereal as you are likely to experience and you’ll feel like you are sat on a far-off planet when stargazing here. Go in the summer for the best chance of seeing the Milky Way curve over the centerpiece monolith.

Flagstaff, Arizona - Flagstaff has the honor of being the first city to become a designated International Dark-Sky City. It even has its own dark sky preservation program, called Flagstaff Dark Skies Coalition. Simply by standing on an unlit city street you’ll have a good chance of viewing hundreds of constellations and the Milky Way. If you take your astronomy more seriously then pass by the Lowell Observatory for a guided tour.

Headlands International Dark Sky Park, Michigan - While the Headlands may not compete with some of the more remote parks, its location on the northwestern shores of Lake Michigan serves up a different perspective. Besides the stars, watching the full moon illuminate the lake is unforgettable. And there’s the added bonus of being able to witness the enchanting Northern Lights. Just keep an eye out for updates on the park programs and events.

Joshua Tree National Park, California - After a spectacular sunset, countless stars, planets and meteorites begin to appear above the park’s high and low desert landscape. There’s superb stargazing to be enjoyed around the nine campgrounds. Visit in November for the Night Sky Festival.

Mauna Kea, Hawaii - Lauded by astronomers as one of the world’s best stargazing destinations, the visibility is helped by an inversion cloud layer that protects the summit from the damp sea air. You can hike or drive by 4WD to the summit, where international astronomy teams conduct research round the clock. The Maunakea Visitor Information Center runs free programs without the need to go all the way to the top.

Cocktail Time - the Park City Area Restaurant Association is hosting its 16th annual summer cocktail contest now through the end of the month. The contest, which was started in 2004, normally runs in July, but was pushed back to run Aug. 1-31 due to the coronavirus. Visit parkcityrestaurants.com to see the 2020 Summer Cocktail Contest participating restaurant and bars and vote for your favorite. The participants share their recipes so you can try the cocktails at home too.

710 Bodega

Alpine Pie Bar

Billy Blanco’s

Blind Dog

Butcher’s Chop House

Eating Establishment

Flanagan’s on Main

Grappa Italian Restaurant

Hearth and Hill

High West

O.P. Rockwell

Royal Street Cafe

Silver Star Cafe

Squatter’s Roadhouse Grill

Waldorf Astoria

Wasatch Brew Pub

 

Outdoor Dining

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 29, 2020

Judy and I have enjoyed eating dinner out on our deck this summer, but sometimes we still like to get out. This week we are sharing the outdoor dining options in Park City and the surrounding areas. And, as with all public gathering places these days, please wear a mask, maintain social distancing and stay home if you are feeling sick.

The Park City Restaurant Association has lots of information about dining in Park City as well as a current list of all open establishments (over 50 are open now) - click here to see them. While restaurants are following guidelines to ensure that dining in a Park City restaurant is safe; some businesses are taking additional steps to protect our community further by including additional social distancing measures, arriving at a specific time or the adoption of no walk-in policies.

Main Street in Historic Park City is also a little different this summer as Sundays are now car-free. The Historic Park City Alliance announced car-free Main Street Sundays will go through September 6, 2020. The 0.8-mile stretch of shops, cafes, bars, and restaurants invites merchants to expand into the street to welcome visitors to the district. Cars will be prohibited on the street from 11:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. On-street dining, shopping, and experiences will vary each week.

There are many beautiful places in Utah with outdoor dining options and Melissa Fields of Ski Utah shares some of the other Utah mountain towns and resort restaurants serving up great food—with a side of fantastic views—on outdoor patios for the 2020 summer season in Bluebird Day Summer Dining.

Little Cottonwood Canyon  - At Alta Ski Area, The Snowpine Lodge's Gulch Pub patio is open daily from 12 a.m. - 8 p.m. Wednesday - Sunday. The Alta Lodge will open for Saturday lunch (dine-in and take-out, noon - 2 p.m.) on August 1; Sunday Brunch service begins on August 2 (9:30 a.m. - 2 p.m., reservations required).

Down canyon at Snowbird, the patios at Snowbird SeventyOne and The Forklift are open daily. Or head into the Snowbird Center to grab a sandwich from Snowbird General Gritts, a pie from Tram Car Pizza or coffee and housemade pastry from Baked & Brewed to enjoy on the ‘Bird’s large Plaza Deck.

Big Cottonwood Canyon - The iconic Silver Fork Lodge and Restaurant located just 1.5 miles west of Solitude in Big Cottonwood Canyon, is open daily for the summer season (8 a.m. - 8 p.m.). Dine inside the restaurant or on the lodge’s large back patio. Or grab food to-go from the Silver Spoon Food Truck, parked in the lodge’s upper parking lot Wednesday through Sunday (noon - 7 p.m.).

Millcreek Canyon - The rustically charming Log Haven serves dinner nightly on its cool and verdant patio surrounded by the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest. 

Park City - While several restaurants operate seasonal patios along Park City’s Historic Main Street in warm weather months, on Sundays this summer, the entire thoroughfare is dedicated to walkers, cyclists and outdoor dining. During Car-free Sundays, cars are prohibited on Park City’s Main Street from 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. through September 6, 2020. On-street dining, shopping and experiences will vary each week.

At Deer Valley Resort, the deck is open (8 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.) at the Deer Valley Grocery ~ Café—as is Pebble Beach, the stand-up paddleboard beach and pond located adjacent to the café’s deck. On June 26, the patio Royal Street Cafe opened for the summer season (11:30 a.m. - 3 p.m., daily).

Sundance Mountain Resort is serving up tasty meals at the Foundry Grill by reservation only with plenty of outdoor seating, as well as grab-and-go options from The Deli and Foodtruck on the lawn. Snag a table and enjoy a sandwich with breathtaking views of Mount Timpanogos. 

Over in the Heber Valley, the same culinary team responsible for Tupelo Park City, is opening Heber City’s newest eatery, Afterword. There, local producers will be highlighted in a farm-to-table experience on Afterword’s spacious patio.

For hungry hikers, climbers and bikers traveling to or from the 450,000-plus-acre High Uintas Wilderness (located east of Kamas along the Mirror Lake Highway), a stop at Samak Smokehouse & Country Store for a sandwich, stickie, smoked trout or cold drinks (and Uintas Recreation Passes) is de rigueur. For those looking to stick around awhile at this Wasatch Back institution, check out the Smokehouse’s Summer BBQ, held outside on the lawn next to the smokehouse on Sunday nights (5 to 8 p.m.) through Labor Day weekend.

Whether you are dining at home or at your favorite local restaurant - our friends at Alpine Distilling have wonderful, locally crafted spirits that are an expression of the rejuvenative effects of time spent outdoors. When Alpine Distilling isn’t making hand sanitizer to help combat Covid-19 they’re busy crafting award-winning spirits that capture the taste of life in a mountain town. Alpine donates a percentage of proceeds to the Park City Swaner Nature Preserve, the Utah Olympic Park, and many other local nonprofit organizations and community initiatives.

Alpine Distilling specializes in botanically-inspired spirits, gin, and spiced bourbon. Their unique Preserve Liqueur was inspired by sunset at the Swaner Nature Preserve and encapsulates notes of blood orange, black tea, raspberry, lemon balm, and ginger. This inspired liqueur just earned Double-Gold Medals at both the World Spirit Awards and London’s Women Wine & Spirit Awards. Their Alpine Gin also scored Double-Gold at London’s Women Wine & Spirit Award. Try this lovely recipe tonight:

ALPINE DISTILLING'S THYME TO PRESERVE

  • 1.5oz. Alpine Gin
  • 0.5oz. Preserve Liqueur
  • 0.75oz. Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 0.5oz. Cane Syrup
  • 2-3 Sprigs of Freshly Cut Thyme
  • 1-2 Lemon Slices
Preparation - Add all ingredients into a cocktail shaker with ice. Cover and shake well until chilled. Double strain over fresh ice and garnish with lemon slices and a fresh sprig or two of thyme.

Getting Outside

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 21, 2020

This week we kick off with What’s Open at Park City’s Resorts and Action-Sports Playgrounds from Park City Magazine by Jane Gendron. The Covid-19 protocols and safety guidelines are in place. Here’s the plan for Park City’s mountain playgrounds.

Deer Valley Resort Chairlifts open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, now through September 7; then, Saturdays and Sundays only through September 20. After a thrilling descent on a mountain bike or a picturesque alpine wander, grab a bite and drink on the deck of Royal Street (11:30 a.m.–3 p.m.) or the Silver Lake Snack Shack (11 a.m.–5 p.m.)—or watch the paddleboard action from the deck of Deer Valley Grocery Café (8 a.m.–3:30 p.m.). Lodging properties are open, parking is available at Snow Park Lodge, and pre-purchase of lift tickets is advised.

Park City Mountain - Park City base activities are open Thursday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–8 p.m., and Sunday, 10 a.m.–7 p.m. Buckle up for some mountain adventure via the alpine slide, mountain coaster, and lift-served hiking and biking courtesy of Crescent and Pay Day lifts. For to-go eats, swing by Jupiter Java, or time your visit for the Wednesday Farmer’s Market in the Silver King lot, noon to 5 p.m. The Extreme Zip is part of Utah Olympic Park’s Jumpside pass, a two-hour unlimited ticket to activities located near the Nordic jumps; a Trackside pass accesses the ropes courses and airbags near the bobsled track.

Utah Olympic Park 9 a.m.–6 p.m. The UOP is leaping into action with a Jumpside Pass and a Trackside Pass (starting July 4), accessing two-hour unlimited sessions on the activities near each location. Jumpside—in the environs of the Nordic jumps—means access to Extreme tubing, the alpine slide, Extreme Zip, Freestyle Zip, and Discovery ropes course. Trackside is focused on everything near the bobsled, including the lofty Summit and Canyon ropes courses and the airbag jumps. Pay for two-hour increments between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m., or just check out the interactive Alf Engen Ski Museum and Eccles Salt Lake 2002 Olympic Winter Games Museum free of charge.

Woodward Park City 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Action sports campus Woodward reopened in May for scooter, skateboarding, and BMX; and the much-anticipated lift-served downhill mountain biking came online in mid-June. Adrenaline-fun seekers are also allowed indoors for parkour and trampoline sessions (in limited numbers). Plus, there’s a multi-action-sport camp (5 or 10 days) for kids ages 6 and up, July 6 through August 14.

Utah is an amazing place to watch the evening skies. Shermans Travel even added the Utah skies to 9 Incredible Stargazing Destinations Around the World. Teresa Bitler shares in this article the Utah’s International Dark Sky Parks. Most Americans live in an area where they cannot see the Milky Way due to the light pollution -- but that's not an issue when stargazing in Utah, which has 15 certified International Dark Sky Parks. This includes Canyonlands National Park, Capitol Reef National Park, Goblin Valley State Park, Dead Horse Point State Park, Antelope Island State Park, Steinaker State Park, Cedar Breaks National Monument, Natural Bridges National Monument, Hovenweep National Monument, Rainbow Bridge National Monument, and Dinosaur National Monument. Judy and I are getting out to see the stars.

Looking to get out on the water - here is the The Insider’s Guide to Four Park City Area Reservoirs: For details about camping, which is available at all four reservoirs, visit stateparks.utah.gov/activities/camping. Here are the four Wasatch Back reservoirs closest to Park City—Deer Creek, Echo, Jordanelle, and Rockport.

Deer Creek - With stunning views of Mount Timpanogos and hugging the road between Heber City and Sundance Resort, Deer Creek Reservoir is about as accessible as it is scenic. It took 17 years to build the Deer Creek Dam and Reservoir, completed in 1955 as part of the Provo River Project. But only fishing was allowed there until 1971, when the state park opened. Now, in addition to boating, swimming, fishing, and camping, Deer Creek is home to the Uinta Kiting kiteboarding school and Zipline Utah’s Screaming Falcon zipline tour.

Get there: Deer Creek Reservoir is 23.5 miles from Park City via US 189/US 40 toward Charleston/Sundance Resort. Day-use fees are $10 per vehicle (up to eight passengers), Monday through Friday; $15 on the weekends. Dogs are not allowed in the day-use areas. 435.654.0171

Echo - Echo Reservoir (filled by the Weber River since 1931) transitioned from privately run to Utah’s newest state park in 2018. The 18-site campground at the reservoir’s south end, which was closed all last summer for renovations, will open this summer and has been renamed Dry Hollow (to dissuade its previously raucous reputation, perhaps). New flushable toilets and shower facilities are scheduled to open this summer as well; portable bathrooms will be used until they are completed. For a truly adventuresome day, ride the 28-mile length of the Historic Union Pacific Rail Trail from Park City to Echo Reservoir.

Get there: Echo State Park is 27 miles from Park City. Take Interstate 80 east to the Coalville exit. Follow the Echo Dam Road along the east side of the reservoir to the state park. The day-use fee is $6 per passenger vehicle (expect an increase when the restroom facilities are complete) and $4 for a walk-in/bicycle. 435.336.9894

Jordanelle - Like Deer Creek, the Jordanelle is fed by the Provo River. The Jordanelle Dam, constructed from 1987 to 1993, holds 320,300 acre-feet of water, which covers the former small towns of Hailstone and Keetley. The Jordanelle State Park opened in 1995. Anything you can do on the water goes there: Park City SUP, the Park City Rowing Academy (801.245.9351), and Park City Sailing all are based at this reservoir. At the Hailstone area, the marina offers all sorts of watercraft rentals (jordanellerentals.com). Eschew the crowds by hiking or pedaling the 15-mile Perimeter Trail, a dirt two-track running along the northern and eastern shores, connecting Hailstone to quieter Rock Cliff recreation area (home to the nature center).

Get there: The Hailstone entrance ($15 admission per car) is 6 miles from Park City along US 40 toward Heber City. The Rock Cliff entrance ($10 admission per car) is 22 miles from Park City via US 40 to River Road/SR 32 east toward Francis. 435.649.9540  

Rockport - You’ll find many of the same amenities offered at Jordanelle, but with a fraction of the people, at Rockport. Until 1952, when the Bureau of Reclamation began buying the property there to build the Wanship Dam, 27 families lived on the land now occupied by the reservoir. Before the area was flooded, some of the town’s buildings were moved to the Pioneer Village at Lagoon Amusement Park. Now at the marina and convenience store, you can rent jet skis, power boats, paddleboards, kayaks—even inflatable water trampolines. Along with boaters and beach-goers, Rockport’s cold water temps provide an ideal fish habitat, making it popular with anglers as well. An unusual amenity is the 3-D archery range: targets that look like mountain lions, bears, and turkeys along the Lakeview Trail.

Get there: From Park City, take SR 248 to Brown’s Canyon Road. Head left on SR 32 at Peoa and follow the signs to the state park. Daily admission to the state park is $12 per car (up to eight people). 435.336.2241 

Mortgage Rates & Economic Updates

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 15, 2020

This week we will start our blog with the current conforming and jumbo mortgage rates for Utah as shared by Josh Mettle followed by the golfing options in Park City and few ideas for freshening up your home's curb appeal.

The Conforming rates are based on a $300 loan amount and 65% loan to value and the Jumbo rates are based on a $1,000,000 loan amount with a $1,250,000 purchase price.

Loan Type Interest Rate APR    
30-yr fixed Conforming 3.25% 3.378%
15-yr fixed Conforming 2.75% 2.981%
 
Loan Type Interest Rate APR    
7/1 ARM Jumbo 3.00% 3.096%
30-yr fixed Jumbo 3.125% 3.219%
15-yr fixed Jumbo 2.875% 3.045%
In more home news - CoreLogic released home appreciation figures for May, showing that prices rose 0.7% from April to May and 4.8% when compared to May of last year and inflation continues to remain tame. At the wholesale level, the Producer Price Index was down 0.2% in June after rebounding in May, coming in much lower than expectations.

CoreLogic also noted that a lot of the demand was pent up from spring to summer with elevated unemployment, and that purchase activity and home prices could fall off once summer ends. It remains to be seen if this latest forecast will prove true, or if the surge in sales and appreciation levels off less steeply, which could still allow for home price gains over the next year.

Now for golf - there is no shortage of golf courses in the Park City area to enjoy. The Park Record has put together a list of all the local golf courses - from public and municipal courses to private clubs there is something for everyone.

Park City Golf Club (public) 1541 Thaynes Canyon Drive, Park City 435-615-5800 18 holes, par 72 $24-$70 This scenic municipal course offers lessons, leagues and a pro shop. Reservations can be made seven days in advance.

Canyons Golf Course (public) 3636 Willow Draw, Park City 435-615-4728 18 holes, par 70 $30-$150 This course features more than 550 feet of elevation change, including 270 feet on Hole 10 from tee to green. Group and individual lessons available.

The Outlaw Golf Club (public) 990 Longview Drive, Hideout 435-901-4227 9 holes, par 30 Located in the eastern foothills of the Jordanelle Reservoir, at the Outlaw, players can enjoy views of the glistening waters of the Jordanelle and the towering mountain peaks.

Soldier Hollow Golf Course (public) 1370 Soldier Hollow Drive, Midway 435-654-7442 Silver Course: 18 holes, par 72 Gold Course: 18 holes, par 72 $40- $50 Silver is the tamer of the two courses, slightly shorter with wider fairways, while the Gold has narrower, more undulating fairways, tee shots requiring longer carry and trickier greens.

Wasatch Mountain Golf Course (public) 975 West Golf Course Drive, Midway 435-654-0532 Lake Course: 18 holes, par 72 Mountain Course: 18 holes, par 71 $45-$50 Wasatch Mountain’s two courses offer serious variety, from the Lake’s gentle terrain to the Mountain’s dramatic elevation changes and potential wildlife sightings.

Mountain Dell Golf Course (public) Interstate 80, Exit 134 in Parleys Canyon 801-582-3812 Lake Course: 18 holes, par 71 Canyon Course: 18 holes, par 72 $13- $58 This Salt Lake City-run municipal course offers a variety of affordable amenities, from lessons to play-until-sunset twilight rates.

Jeremy Ranch Golf & Country Club (private) 8770 Jeremy Ranch Road, Park City 801-531-9000 18 holes, par 72 Membership required Nestled in Upper East Canyon of the Wasatch Mountains, Jeremy Ranch is the only Arnold Palmer Signature Course in Utah.

Park Meadows Country Club (private) 2000 Meadows Drive, Park City 435-649-2460 18 holes, par 72 Membership required This Jack Nicklaus Signature course has been called one of the best courses in Utah and Park Record readers have selected its Hole 15 as the best in Park City multiple times.

Glenwild Golf Club (private) 7600 Glenwild Dr., Park City 435-615-9966 18 holes, par 71 Membership required This course features a meandering creek with a series of lakes and shot values that enhance its playability and scenic appeal.

Promontory (limited public availability) 8758 N Promontory Ranch Road, Park City 888-458-6600 Pete Dye Canyon Course: 18 holes, par 72 Nicholas Painted Valley Golf Course: 18 holes, par 72 Limited open play at Pete Dye Canyon Course, $100-$250 Membership required at Nicholas Painted Valley Golf Course Dye Canyon rewards accuracy and takes dramatic advantage of the rugged terrain, while the links-style Painted Valley rewards the ability to hit the ball an incredible distance.

Talisker Club, Talisker Tuhaye Course (private) 9875 N. Tuhaye Park Drive, Kamas 866-253-8538 18 holes, par 72 Membership required Tuhaye is set against spectacular long-range views of Mount Timpanogos, Deer Valley’s ski runs and the shimmering waters of the Jordanelle Reservoir.

Victory Ranch (private) 7474 Victory Club Drive, Kamas 435-785-5030 18 holes, par 72 Membership required The course features 400 feet of elevation change but of all the vistas on the course, the 360-degree panoramic view from the championship tee box on the 17th hole is the real jewel.

Red Ledges Golf Course (private) 205 Red Ledges Blvd., Heber City 877-733-5334 18 holes, par 72 Membership required In addition to the 18-hole Jack Nicklaus Signature Course, Red Ledges boasts a family-friendly 12-hole Golf Park, with optional oversized cups and a layout that encourages bounces toward the hole.

We will wrap up this week's blog with 3 Tips to Glam Up Your Curb Appeal from Realtor Magazine. Curb appeal is even more important as more home buyers shop for homes from a distance and narrow the lists of which homes they want to view in-person. Here are some of their ideas to boost your curb appeal:

Pay attention to the driveway and walkways. You can take steps to make even concrete look good. After all, the driveway and walkways are what lead the eye toward a home’s front door. Any cracks or weeds popping up can present an eyesore. Patch the concrete with caulk and finish a concrete driveway and walkway with a clear, glossy sealer.

Fix up the garage. The garage is often an after-thought but it takes up a big portion of a home’s curb appeal, try painting the garage doors the same color as the home’s trim. Garage doors with a row of windows filter in more light and make it feel part of a home. Garage window kits are available for many models. You can swap out existing panels and add glass inserts.

Paint the front door. Peeling paint or rusty hardware on the front door isn’t very welcoming to a potential home buyer. If you’re going to spend money on one thing to add curb appeal, make it a new door. Front doors with glass inserts can help create a more welcoming space. But for homeowners looking to save, a fresh coat of paint may suffice.

 
 
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