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Skyscrapers

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 11, 2019

Last week we shared that the millennial population represents approximately 23 percent of the Utah population which makes sense that Downtown Salt Lake City is increasingly a hub for young, tech-savvy workers who live and play among the skyscrapers. The Salt Lake Tribune shares that Salt Lake City’s downtown is thriving — and changing. Young, educated and tech-smart workers are moving into condos and apartments close to their jobs and a host of new restaurants, bars and theaters across the business core.

A new study, commissioned by the Downtown Alliance, representing merchants in the heart of Salt Lake City, has documented that growth in the working-age population, comparing it to other large cities in the West. Its key finding: Utah’s downtown workforce is more tech based but also on the lower end of the national salary scale for that sector.

The availability of highly skilled workers is a leading factor — more important than office rents or other metrics — for companies deciding to locate in Salt Lake City, said Matthew Vance, senior research director and economist for CBRE, who led the research. And as Salt Lake City’s downtown continues to flourish along with Utah’s overall economy, that talent pool is giving it a competitive edge among major cities such as Denver, Portland, Seattle, Boise, Omaha and Austin. It is also pushing related growth in markets for office space, residential units, hospitality and retail outlets. “Job growth is the driving force for all things real estate,” Vance said.

Matt Baldwin, board chairman for the Downtown Alliance, said “the future for Salt Lake City’s downtown has never been brighter. The economy is growing and the skyline is rising.” Baldwin noted that five major high-rise projects would get underway in 2020, adding nearly 100 stories to the skyline between them, along with 2 million square feet of new office space and hundreds of apartments and hotel rooms.

Along with the pending renovation of the Salt Lake Temple by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he said, those projects will make next year the city’s “Year of the Construction Crane.” Commissioned by the Downtown Alliance and conducted by analysts at real estate firm CBRE, the study finds that Utah’s capital ranks high among comparable cities, many with larger populations, for the recent growth in its working-age population.

Those workers are younger — median age just above 32 — and have more technology degrees per capita than their counterparts in at least six other metropolitan areas. And at least in the technology sector, the average wages in a range of top jobs are lower here than in Seattle, Denver, Portland and Austin, CRBE found. Only similar workers in Omaha and Boise had lower average wages, at $70,349 and $66,556 yearly, respectively, compared to Salt Lake City’s average annual wage of $71,710.

This probably why Salt Lake City is also the Best City for Young Entrepreneurs. Small Biz Trends shares which cities are most popular with young entrepreneurs between the ages of 25 and 34 and Salt Lake City comes in first. The rankings reflect the percentage of young entrepreneurs to the overall population in metropolitan areas of the United States with over 50,000 people. We also identify factors such as industry clusters, lifestyle, infrastructure, costs, workforce availability and a thriving entrepreneurial community nearby.

1. Salt Lake City - Known for its booming tech industry leading to the area’s designation as part of the Silicon Slopes, Salt Lake City is a magnet in the western U.S. for young entrepreneurs. Today, 1,973 young entrepreneurs call the city home, accounting for .17% of the population. Plenty of networking and a welcoming business community are hallmarks of Salt Lake City. Entrepreneurs like Robert Brady, the Founder of Righteous Marketing says he travels from his home base in Idaho down to Salt Lake regularly to network and connect with other entrepreneurs. “They are an amazing group of people.”

2. Oklahoma City - Often called simply OKC, the city is also OK with young entrepreneurs.

3. Denver - Millennial migration to Denver is now well documented. So the presence of so many young entrepreneurs in the metro area is a no-brainer.

4. Seattle - The city that launched Kurt Cobain and the Grunge revolution is still young at heart.

5. Los Angeles - LA is home to 15,409 young entrepreneurs. That may make it sound like the city deserves a higher ranking here. But in the behemoth that Los Angeles is, that number represents only .12% of the metro population.

6. Portland - Oregon’s largest city keeps young entrepreneurs busy and when not working on their businesses, these young entrepreneurs have plenty to do in Portland’s unique culture that celebrates “weird.”

7. Tampa - The city’s major industries include finance, retail and insurance, But the local economy is also buoyed up by shipping, national defense, professional sports, tourism and real estate.

8. Minneapolis - The city trails only Chicago and Detroit as the largest economic centers in the Midwest. And it is home to such Fortune 500 companies as Target, U.S. Bancorp and Ameriprise Financial.

9. San Diego - San Diego is named for a Spanish saint but the metro area is clearly revered by young entrepreneurs as well.

10. San Jose - Located in California’s Silicon Valley, the area is already known for tech entrepreneurs. And there are many young entrepreneurs too — a total of 2,156 of them work in the metro area making up .11% of the population.

Sometimes we need to relax and here are 6 Tremendous Spa Treatments for the Athlete (and Weekend Warrior) by Park City Magazine. Recover from hard-charging, on-mountain fun with these specialty massages, salty floats, and more.

Foot Zoning

Park City Massage and Spa (formerly Silver Mountain Spa) In addition to all the classic spa treatments, Park City Massage and Spa’s robust menu offers everything from jet lag recovery to Cranial Sacral Therapy to body mapping. One unique option for athletes is Foot Zoning, done by intuitive wellness and certified foot zone therapist Wendy Wise. Using massage that taps into the nerves on your feet (which connect to corresponding areas in your body), foot zoning “improves circulation and the body’s ability to communicate with itself and detoxify,” Wise says. “We nickname it the ‘Ph.D. level of reflexology’ because people have heard of reflexology, but it’s much more than that—it’s easiest to understand once you experience it.” By focusing on your feet, Wise says she can strategically open structural space and help oxygenate the entire body. You’ll learn a lot about your immune and hormonal systems and overall health in the process, too.

Alpine Body Rescue

Spa Montage Deer Valley To alleviate muscle pain and tension from outdoor endeavors, Spa Montage Supervisor Dominic McKenzie recommends the Alpine Body Rescue, a strong-pressure massage that includes a therapeutic heat pack and aromatic blend to relieve neck and shoulder tension. For a more relaxing head-to-toe treatment, he also suggests the Seasonal Renewal, a blend of full-body exfoliation and dry brushing followed by a hot stone massage and grounding foot treatment.

Float Therapy

SYNC Float Center Athletes have long used Epsom salt baths to recover from hard workouts, and float therapy amplifies those pain-relieving benefits. During a 30- or 60-minute float, you’ll be immersed in a pod filled with water and 1,000 pounds of magnesium sulfate, which allows you to float on the surface. “There are three different therapies going on during a float,” explains SYNC co-owner Justin Hunter. “Magnesium absorbs into the skin and helps relax tension and lowers stress response, facilitates healing, and increases antioxidant production.” Also, the water allows you to spread out over the surface and elongates your muscles—great for compressive sports like mountain biking or skiing—and the sensory reduction enhances focus, clarity, and creativity. “Research has shown that an hour float is equal to four hours of sleep as far as what the body can get done,” Hunter says.

High Mountain Foot Recovery

The Spa at Hotel Park City Runners and hikers putting in high mileage should consider the High Mountain Foot Recovery, a therapeutic 25-minute massage that combines reflexology techniques with a skin hydration treatment. Hotel Park City also has a full lineup of treatments, including skin, hair, and nails, with a sauna and eucalyptus steam room to relax in afterwards.

Ninety-Nine 90 Therapeutic Leg Recovery

RockResorts Spa at The Grand Summit, Park City Mountain Named after the iconic expert lift at Park City Mountain, this leg-focused massage (50 or 80 minutes) at Canyons Village’s RockResorts Spa is useful for yes, skiers, but also anyone who uses his or her leg muscles in a big way. “The therapists focus on the legs to move out the lactic acid and they know which muscles need to get worked on the most based on what activities the athlete is doing,” says spa concierge Sally Smith. The treatment includes a cooling aromatic compress on your legs in combination with targeted compressions, stretching, and pressure-point massage to regenerate muscles and eliminate swelling.

CBD Massage Experience

Align Spa Tapping into the anxiety-reducing and pain-relieving properties of CBD, Align Spa allows you to upgrade your massage—Swedish, Reflexology, Deep Tissue, and more—with a CBD experience. Using wide spectrum raw hemp, CBD oil is incorporated into your full-body massage followed by a custom tea blended with CBD, and a take-home muscle relief or calming bath bomb.

Oktoberfest

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 04, 2019

The kids are back in school and nights are getting cooler, Snowbird reminds us that it is time for Oktoberfest and it’s about more than just bending elbows. Oktoberfest at Snowbird is a family-friendly affair with activities, food, and, of course, brews for days — weeks actually. The highly-anticipated festival is now open and lasts through mid-October, taking place every Saturday and Sunday. It’s probably the greatest beer festival Utah has to offer, so don’t miss out! Snowbird’s Oktoberfest attracts thousands of visitors each year making it one of the largest festivals in Utah. Admission to Oktoberfest is free and the event runs from Noon - 6 pm.

The origins of Oktoberfest date back to 19th-century Bavaria, when King Ludwig called for a state fair in Munich to celebrate his autumn marriage. Here in Utah, it wasn’t until 1973 — 2 years after Snowbird opened — when the festival took root.

The annual festival includes a biergarten offering more than 50 varieties of beer. This includes traditional German-style beers and those made by Utah breweries, including Moab Brewery, Bohemian, Uinta and Squatters. Oktoberfest food choices include select German favorites, such as bratwurst, weisswurst, sauerkraut, apple strudel, spaetzle, beef rouladen, pretzels and Bavarian roasted almonds.

Coming up September 13-14 Park City becomes home to "The Best Little Mountain Music Festival in America". The Utah Daily Chronicle shares Park City Songwriter Festival Focuses on the Storytelling of Music. The inaugural Park City Songwriter Festival, crafted for devoted listeners of America’s greatest musicians, was founded in-part by songwriter Aaron Benward as a celebration of his favorite aspects of songs and the intimate stories behind them.

Benward is no stranger to the bright lights and big stages of the music industry. He first entered the music scene as a Christian Contemporary artist as part of a father-son duo, Aaron Jeoffrey. The two released several studio albums and produced numerous chart-topping singles before Benward debuted as a solo act with his album “Imagine.” Even with his music’s acclaim, Benward remains passionate about the closeness of songs and connecting listeners to what he calls, “the heroes of music — the songwriters.” This drive inspired his co-created “Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind the Song” events, where listeners and musicians alike share their love for music.

It’s fitting, then, that the Park City Songwriter Festival was dreamt up in the same way. In tandem with friends Ben Anderson and Scott Thompson, Anderson has been developing the event since January 2018. Anderson’s focus remains in promoting concerts for music lovers, as the president of the non-profit Mountain Town Music and bassist in his own Nashville band Aiko. Thompson, as a music fan himself, owns two of the venues on Main Street — O.P. Rockwell, where Western music hall meets Victorian speakeasy, and the Rockwell Listening Room, converted to an up-close and personal venue.

Though this celebration of country and folk music takes place away from the music’s Nashville roots, Benward describes Park City as the perfect location for the event. “This is the perfect spirit and environment to experience music in its most organic form, with the venues all located along Main Street.” Patrons can easily move through downtown Park City and the unique atmospheres of five distinct venues — something that could only work in the heart of one of Utah’s most popular destinations.

However, the personal environment of the festival shouldn’t lure attendees into overlooking the sheer talent of the lineup. Featuring spectacular headliners like “bayou soul” artist Marc Broussard, New-Orleans based guitarist Anders Osbourne and long-running band the North Mississippi AllStars, the festival artists — over 40 in number — boast a combined total of 17 Grammy wins, 12 Academy of Country Music Awards, 11 American Country Awards wins and five Hall of Famers, among many other accolades.

The PCSF has even partnered with outreach organizations such as the Recording Academy’s MusiCares and Osbourne’s Send Me a Friend to support professionals in the music industry, placing a charity focus on the festival to help artists struggling with mental health issues or addiction recovery that often go unnoticed.

One cornerstone of the PCSF that makes it different from any other festival is its honesty. Founded by music lovers, to share music’s bare-bones and to connect talented storytellers to their listeners, the atmosphere of the event is sure to be magical. As Benward said, “There’s nothing like being up close and personal to music at its core – the song. No smoke and mirrors, no lights and walls of sound. Just the songwriter on a stool with their instrument of choice, up close and personal.”

The festival will be held on Sept. 13-14 on Main Street in Park City, Utah. The two-day event features dozens of performances and workshops in the five venues. There are three ticket tiers, including various levels of access to reservations, dinners, nightly concerts and swag. Tickets are still available and can be purchased here or through the festival’s website.

Utah Business shares that Utah Has More Millennials Than Any Other State. Utah’s millennial population represents approximately 23 percent of the state (726,000 people). Roughly one in every four Utahns is a millennial?a higher percentage than in any other state. As a cohort, Utah’s millennial population is 20 percent larger than the state’s Gen-X population and 39 percent larger than the state’s baby boomer population. Which begs the question: How does Utah’s large millennial population impact Utah?

While the definitions of generational cohorts vary, a common definition of the millennial generation includes anyone born between 1981 and 1996 (ages 23 to 38 in 2019). They are called millennials because they reached adulthood around the turn of the 21st Century. They are old enough to remember the 9/11 terrorist attacks and many of them entered the workforce during the Great Recession. These and other events shaped their world view.

Some people joke about millennials as self-absorbed, entitled, and eager for instant gratification. Maybe there is some truth to that, but they also set a great example for the rest of us in the way they value Mother Earth, promote work-life balance, and appreciate diversity. Millennials are also better educated than prior generations, especially among women.

The Salt Lake Chamber recently asked in their CEOutlook (a quarterly survey of a diverse mix of Utah CEOs) how Utah’s young workforce impacts their business and hiring practices. The results were at once telling, discouraging, and inspiring.

One CEO wrote: “With our younger population, we find we have to engage them more proactively because they want to be involved and challenged.” Another said younger workers “want to make a difference in the community” and not just collect a paycheck. I love that Utah’s younger workforce chooses to be civically engaged.

Another CEO said she sees a trend toward more flexible hours and more emphasis on early career benefits such as child care and maternity leave. I see this as an important step for families.

Several CEOs opined about the different work behaviors of millennials. They commented on the “lack of long-term commitment in the workforce” and “more frequent turnover.” This matches some of the behaviors I’ve observed as well. I think employers need to adapt to this changing reality by helping to improve work-life balance and making work more than a place to collect a paycheck.

CEOs also commented on the mismatch between expectations and skill levels. One said, “the younger workforce has higher expectations of job perks and benefits, but lack essential skills to perform at an average level.” Another said, “millennials have a very different view of the workplace. They want more for less. That is a challenge in an environment where client budgets are shrinking and clients are asking more for less.” Ouch… perhaps millennials too need to adapt to economic realities.

Looking to the future, I’m struck by three observations. First, let’s relish Utah’s young, diverse, tech-savvy, healthy, and community-minded population. It’s a competitive advantage for us. Second, let’s adapt to the changing realities presented by this large, curious, multi-tasking, open-minded, connected, and environmentally keen generation. We have much to learn from them.

And finally, let’s remember something I learned from studying the work of Pew. Michael Dimock says, “generations are a lens through which to understand societal change, rather than a label with which to oversimplify differences between groups.” Within each generational label are individuals working each day to fulfill their potential. Let this truth be our guide.

Home Tips & Bike Rides

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 28, 2019

This week we have a few DIY updates for your kitchen that won't break the bank, four things you should not skimp on when buying a home and the skinny on where to drop in for a weekly bike ride, hail a guide, demo some wheels, or take a lesson in Park City.

For many people, Apartment Therapy shares that a kitchen is a lot more than where you reheat leftovers or wash dishes. It’s where you sit and catch up with an old friend over a glass of rosé. It’s where the kids do their homework after school. It’s the heart (and, yes, stomach) of your house, so it’s important your kitchen is somewhere you actually want to spend time in. While renovating your kitchen is one way to get the space of your dreams, it can cost you a pretty penny. In fact, HomeAdvisor found the average kitchen renovation can cost anywhere between $12,594 and $33,118. Yikes!

Fortunately, you don’t have to shell out the big bucks for a space you truly love. Below are some hacks for a stylish upgrades for a fraction of the price.

Take Cover - Unless you created your space from scratch, there’s a good chance you didn’t have a say in what cabinet doors are in your kitchen. The good news is you’re not stuck with ‘em forever. Swapping out your cabinet doors is a surprisingly easy task that will completely transform your kitchen’s look. Now, all you need to do is find a door that tugs at your design heartstrings. We have a few suggestions.

Cool Knobs - Another way to spice up your kitchen cabinets? Replacing the knobs. A great alternative for D.I.Y. rookies, changing your knobs is a great way to add a personal touch to a pre-furnished home or rental space. You could select one knob and stick with it, but we think mixing and matching different will give your kitchen a cool, bohemian vibe.

Pegged for Greatness - If you’re always whipping up delicious recipe after delicious recipe, you don’t have the time to sift through your drawers to find your favorite sauce pot or paring knife. Instead, you need all your essentials right where you can see ‘em. Hanging a pegboard from your wall is not only practical, but it’ll make your space feel like a professional chef’s kitchen. (Fun fact: Julia Child was a pegboard fan.)

Beautiful Backsplash - No, your backsplash doesn’t have to be set in stone. Thanks to a range of peel-and-stick tile decals, you can change your backsplash as often you self-clean your oven. From traditional subway tile, to sleek marble, to a funky mosaic, there’s bound to be a backsplash that complements your design style. (Psst… you can check out some of our favorite, out-of-the-box backsplash ideas here.)

Stylish Shelving - You don’t have to be a design guru to know that open shelves are one of the biggest kitchen trends around. Fortunately, you don’t need to undergo a big renovation project to bring these into your space. Easy to install, these shelves will give your kitchen a stylish touch and max out your space’s storage capacity. And don’t worry, renters: There are plenty of adhesive options for you, too.

Let There Be Light - We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Lighting can make or break a room — and no, we’re not just talking about the brightness of your bulbs or number of light sources. Upgrading your space’s standard flush mount will create a “wow” factor, convincing your guests that you put a lot more work into your kitchen than you really did. Check out these unique lighting ideas that will illuminate your space.

If you are in the market for a new place - there are Four Things You Shouldn’t Skimp on When Buying a Home, According to Real Estate Experts - Apartment Therapy.

Buying a home is expensive. But, cheaping out may save you in the short term, but it can cause major headaches—and end up being way more expensive—in the long run. Here are four things you should never skimp on when buying a home, according to real estate experts:

Electric work - You need electricity for a variety of daily tasks, so don’t take any shortcuts when it comes to the electrical setup in your home. According to Gill Chowdhury of Warburg Realty, upgraded electrical in older homes is necessary to support modern conveniences many of us take for granted, such as a washer and dryer and central air conditioning.

The location - The old refrain of “location, location, location” is not just an empty adage. If you stretch the bounds of where you really want to live, you’ll likely be disappointed down the road. Bernstein points out while that you can always modify your home with additions and renovations, where that house is located is set in stone.

“Living in a better location might save you 20 minutes (each way) in commuting, which will add up to thousands of hours you can have back in your life,” says Martin Eiden, a real estate agent with Compass in New York City.

Homeowners insurance - You probably already know that homeowners insurance is a must, but you should also keep in mind that any old policy will not necessarily do. “While insurance is required by lenders, that doesn’t stop homeowners from skimping on the coverage amount to save money every month,” says John Holloway, co-founder of NoExam.com, a digital insurance brokerage. In lieu of reducing coverage, Holloway recommends reducing your rate by taking preventative measures. For example, a security system with monitoring for police and fire can cut your rates by about five percent. Similarly, cutting down dangerous trees or updating your plumbing or electrical work reduces your chances of making a claim, and in turn, your rates.

“Always maintain replacement cost value coverage, which would cover the replacement cost on the loss of your personal property as well as the structure,” advises Tara King of HomeSmart Cherry Creek Properties in Greenwood Village, Colorado.

The inspection- The inspection is another necessary part of the home-buying process that should not be taken lightly. “A whole home inspector is going to walk through a very long and exhaustive list of items to check,” says Taylor. “They may not see everything, but they’re likely to see things that you cannot. These detailed inspections can protect you form problems that even the seller didn’t know about, and therefore didn’t disclose to you.” Buying a home is difficult enough, so don’t skip an inspection to save a few hundred dollars when it could end up saving you thousands.”

Park City has amazing bike trails and Park City Magazine has the skinny on where to drop in for a weekly bike ride, hail a guide, demo some wheels, or take a lesson.

Drop in for a free weekly ride - White Pine Touring (1790 Bonanza Drive, 435.649.8710, whitepinetouring.com) leads guided rides on Tuesdays (for women only) and Thursdays (co-ed). For the skinny tire set, Cole Sport (1615 Park Ave, 435.649.4806, colesport.com) leads a Monday night road ride for intermediate and advanced riders. Stay Park City (stayparkcitycycling.com) organizes a slew of guided rides throughout the week—MTB, gravel, and road—most of which start deliciously at Ritual Chocolate. Though a bit more sporadic in timing, Silver Star Ski & Sport (1825 Three Kings Dr, 435.645.7827,

silverstarskiandsport.com) leads a one-hour, easygoing cruise along the neighborhood’s paved trail system, starting and ending at the shop, as a part of the signature “Cruiserpalooza” festivities.

Take a lesson - Deer Valley Resort’s Mountain Bike School (2250 Deer Valley Drive South, 435.645.6648, deervalley.com) is essentially ski school for bikers, where seasoned coaches steer all levels of riders through the single-track and downhill learning curve. For small fries, Young Riders’ (youngriders.com) summer programs typically sell out early, but both Park City Recreation (parkcity.org) and Basin Recreation (basinrecreation.org) roll out dirt jump and children’s MTB camps, respectively. For a female-focused experience, Women in the Mountains (womeninthemountains.com) has clinics for all levels led by former pro and certified professional mountain bike instructor Erica Tingey and her fellow coaches.

Hail a guide - Plenty of local outfits offer expert-led rides (beyond the aforementioned freebies). For a unique adventure, check out White Pine Touring’s bike-and-fish combo that starts with a killer descent down the WOW Trail followed by a guide-delivered lunch, gear change, and fly fishing on the Provo.

Try out some new wheels - Demos, offered at most cycling outfits, are a great way for gearheads to get their fix or for newbies to see what style best suits their needs. Storm Cycles (1153 Center Drive, Suite G140, 435.200.9120, stormcycles.net), offers free demos on June 2 (also the shop’s grand opening at its new home), June 30, Aug 11, and Sept 29.

Don a bib - If you want to soak in local, zany (and challenging) tradition, register for the costume-bedecked Tour de Suds (mountaintrails.org). Fear not, you have all summer to train for the 2,700 feet of vertical (and pint-hoisting). For an all-levels race, check out the Midweek MTB Series (midweekmtb.com). Cross-country and mini-enduro racers are divided by class, so newbies won’t be steamrolled by the pros, plus there are free kids’ races packed into the fun. For a supported ride, the National Ability Center’s Summit Challenge (summitchallenge100.org) is a feel-good, all-inclusive event with a choice of four courses, ranging from 16 to 100 miles. If you really want to test your mettle, gear up for the annual, grueling, 75-mile Park City Point 2 Point (thepcpp.com), or sign onto The Ultimate Challenge, which allows amateurs a 94-mile or 44-mile sniff of the Tour of Utah experience, tourofutah.com.

Golfing In Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 20, 2019

School has started, but there is still time in the season for golf. Park City Magazine shares where to putt, drive, and roll with the greens in Park City. But, before we get to golfing we wanted to let our readers know that the Parley’s Summit wildlife overpass is working! Click on the Facebook link from the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources to see deer, lions and bears - oh my. https://www.facebook.com/UtahDWR/videos/490781644940678/

Wasatch Mountain Golf Course (975 W Golf Course Dr, Midway, 435.654.0532,) is set among the stunning unspoiled scenery of Wasatch Mountain State Park with two public courses and low fees that take the pressure off. Duff away an afternoon with the kids, or all by yourself.

Canyons Golf at Park City Mountain’s Canyons Village (3720 N Sundial Ct, Park City, 435.615.4728, parkcitymountain.com) is an 18-hole course on the ski hill that drops 550 feet in elevation. You’ll play from top to bottom puzzling over long, tricky downhill shots.

Soldier Hollow’s Olympic-themed course (1370 W Soldier Hollow Lane, Midway, 435.654.7442, soldierhollowgolf.com) offers a unique configuration with two courses: Gold and Silver. Of the two, the Silver is naturally more forgiving.

Park City Golf Club (1541 Thaynes Canyon Dr, 435.615.5800, parkcity.org) hosts Happy Hour League, featuring monthly four-person scramble tournaments through September. Beats Tinder. And for golfers not seeking a mate, PC Muni has leagues for all ages and stages, plus open tee times on its mountain-flanked 18 holes.

Trailside Park Disc Golf Course (1388 Center Dr, Park City, 435.655.0999) offers nine holes amid the sagebrush hills above the park, with challenges for masters of the disc and easy sight lines for beginners.

And for that really short game, head to Park City Mountain (parkcitymountain.com) grab a putter, and swing away at either of the two 18-hole mini-golf courses, one at each base.

Wine Spectator says these are the 7 best Utah restaurants for wine - Seven Utah restaurants earned top honors last month, when Wine Spectator magazine released its 2019 Restaurant Wine List Awards. Here’s snapshot of Utah’s seven best restaurants for wine in Utah — and 14 other medal winners.

Veneto Ristorante Italiano • This 3-year-old restaurant — which separates itself from other fine-dining restaurants with its no-tipping policy — has about 385 wine selections. Strengths include wines from Tuscany and Piedmont. 370 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City; (801) 359-0708 or www.venetoslc.com.

Tupelo • This farm-to-table restaurant, which also opened in 2016, increased its selections to 375 from 2018. Strengths include wines from California, Italy and France. 508 Main St., Park City; 435-615-7700 or tupeloparkcity.com.

Bangkok Thai on Main • This Park City restaurant has maintained its “best of” status for more than a decade, having first earned it in 2007. It has more than 650 wines in the collection, many that keep the savory and spicy flavors of Thai cuisine in mind. Strengths: wines from California, Bordeaux and Italy. 605 Main (inside Park Hotel), Park City, 435-649-8424 or bangkokthaionmain.com.

Aerie at Snowbird • Located in the Cliff Lodge, this restaurant offers a spectacular view of the mountains and one of the largest wine lists in the state with more than 1,200 offerings. Strengths: wines from California, Burgundy, Bordeaux, Rhône, Italy, Argentina and Oregon. 9600 Little Cottonwood Canyon Road, Salt Lake City; 801-933-2160 or snowbird.com.

Glitretind at Stein Eriksen Lodge • The signature restaurant, inside a Norwegian-inspired lodge, has 1,500 wine selections and has an expert staff willing to help customers navigate the options. Strengths: wines from California, Burgundy, Bordeaux, Rhône, Italy, Oregon and Champagne. 7700 Stein Way, Park City; 435-645-6455 or steinlodge.com.

J&G Grill • The signature restaurant at the St. Regis Deer Valley has 900 wine selections on its list ranging from the industry icons to small producers using new wine-making techniques. Strengths: wines from California, Bordeaux, Burgundy and Italy. 2300 Deer Valley Drive East, Park City; (435) 940-5760 or jggrilldeercrest.com.

Spencer’s for Steaks & Chops • This Salt Lake City steakhouse has nearly 450 wines in the collection. It also does a lot of special ordering of wines that aren’t usually available in Utah’s state-run liquor stores Strengths: wines from California, France and Italy. 255 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City; 801-238-4748 or spencersforsteaksandchops.com.

Award of Excellence • First-time winners include Cucina Toscana in Salt Lake City and Riverhorse on Main in Park City. La Caille at Quail Run also returned to the list in 2019, after a short absence.

Repeat winners include BTG Wine Bar, Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar, Log Haven and Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, all in Salt Lake City; the Steak Pit in Snowbird; 350 Main, Cena Ristorante and Edge Steakhouse in Park City; and Fireside Dining, The Mariposa and Seafood Buffet at Deer Valley Resort.

Feeling romantic, Park City has topped the list of 10 Most Romantic Places To Go For Your Honeymoon On A Budget. Everyone dreams of the perfect wedding, but the perfect honeymoon can be a little harder to come by. With all of your funds spent on the actual ceremony, you're often left with very little to spend on the celebration that's meant to be just for you and your special someone.

Park City, Utah - Why drop a bunch of money on a trip to the Swiss Alps when you can get the same quality experience in Park City, Utah? Another option for couples who love the snow, Park City has awesome slopes for skiing. As far as romantic activities go, you can go snow-shoeing in the moonlight or take a sleigh ride. We mean, when you're not curled up by the fireside watching the snow fall from indoors. Many of the places to stay up there also have not just jacuzzis, but heated pools both indoors and outdoors. The vibe and aesthetic of Park City is high-end like the Swiss Alps, but not nearly as expensive.

Ski Resorts and The Tour of Utah

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 13, 2019

The Deseret News shares that a developer plans to make Utah site the first new full-service ski resort in country since 1980 - By Amy Donaldson. For nearly 40 years, no developer has managed to build and open a new, full-service ski resort, but it’s not because there wasn’t demand for one or a desire to do so.

"I know that the mountains are littered with developers who thought they were going to do something and nothing happened,” said Gary Barnett, founder and chairman of Extell Development Company, who unveiled plans Monday for a ski resort and village that includes hotels, condominiums and residential housing. ”I mean, nothing has really been done in the country in the last 30 years, since Beaver Creek, really. … It’s so hard to do.”

So what makes a guy who doesn’t even ski think he can do what no one else has managed since 1980? A unique set of circumstances and colleagues with a vision.”I think once again, one of the important things for us was the ability to tap into tax increment financing,” he said, referring to the fact that Wasatch County had designated the Mayflower Resort area as a place where Utah’s Military Industrial Development Agency could build a recreation hotel, which returns some of the property tax generated from development to developers in exchange for reduced fees for military personnel.

”The fact that MIDA is there, supporting it and helping speed up the process, was a very necessary component for me to get involved. I would not have gotten involved otherwise,” Barnett said. The project — Mayflower Mountain Resort — is ambitious in its scope, with plans for 5,600 acres that are just west of U.S. 40 and Jordanelle Reservoir (near Exit 8) and adjacent to Deer Valley that includes 1,520 residential units, 825 hotel rooms and commercial units and 600 skier parking spaces.

It will be the first recreation project created to work with the military for the state, said Kurt Krieg, vice president of development. The Military Industrial Development Agency is a state-run economic development entity with a military focus, which in this case, offers ski resort vacation opportunities to military personnel at a fraction of the cost.

Among the advantages the new resort will have is its proximity to one of the state’s top rated resorts — Deer Valley. ”We have the ability to connect to Deer Valley,” Barnett said, noting that Extell just renegotiated a lease of land to Deer Valley that makes the future more predictable for both entities. ”Obviously, they’d have to purchase a Deer Valley ticket, but there is that ability to provide skiing. We feel like the access from our side of the mountain is exceptional.”

The location of Mayflower may offer it some unique advantages that other start-ups don’t enjoy, including 35 minutes and no stop lights from the Salt Lake City International Airport to the freeway exit.

”There is no other resort of this scale, maybe around the world, that I know of that is 35 minutes from a major, international airport,” he said. “It’s going to have access to everywhere. … That’s the No. 1 thing Utah has going for it is this access. And we have straight highway, no traffic lights. … So we’ve got everything in our favor to get this thing done.” The goal is to have the village and some ski runs open within five years.

Extell has discussed climate change challenges, as they planned the development and acquired land, Barnett said. It also hopes to be supportive, if not involved in, Utah’s bid for another Winter Olympics in 2030 or 2034. “We love the idea, and we’d love to be involved in it,” he said. “Anything we do would have to be coordinated with Deer Valley and the state of Utah, but we certainly love the idea of playing a very active role. We hope we get it in 2030.”

Some of what Barnett and his team envision is similar to what’s out there. Some of it is unique. But before they can begin to build anything, they are conducting a voluntary cleanup of the mountain, because the last mining companies left in 1969 without the resources to clean up any contamination. The land has been vacant, even as development occurred around it, in part because of the contamination and in part because it was owned by a foreign trust with a trustee who sought a higher price than anyone was willing to pay.

As the trustees re-negotiated representation, the land became available and then it was a matter of cleaning up the contamination in order to develop it in the ways Extell envisions. On Monday, several members of the Extell team and the Military Industrial Development Agency representatives took media on a tour of the picturesque site, pointing out where ski lifts might be, where water tanks will be installed and how cleanup will work.

In some places, as much as 18 inches of soil is being removed and it will be taken to a central location and capped, as is standard in these types of cases, according to Krieg, who led the tour. While no other full service resort has opened in the U.S. since 1980, about a half dozen terrain parks or ski resorts without on-site lodging have opened, including Cherry Peak, which is 20 minutes outside Logan, and two hours north of Salt Lake City. But nothing like most of Utah’s resorts — and nothing like what Extell has planned for Mayflower Resort.

”We have the makings of a really beautiful resort town,” he said. “And that’s what we’re looking at doing.”

The Tour of Utah is once again scheduled to pedal two of its six legs through Summit County and finish on Main Street in Park City. This year’s race covers 477 miles around northern Utah as racers compete in 13 King of the Mountain climbs up an estimated 37,882 feet, and through another 15 sprint competitions. The main events for Summit County spectators are scheduled to take place on Saturday, Aug. 17, the fifth leg of the race, and Sunday, Aug. 18, the sixth and final stage.

The fifth stage of the race begins at 2:30 p.m. and will loop from the Canyons Village at Park City mountain around the Jordanelle and Rockport reservoirs before heading back to the resort. There will be sprint lines in Kamas and Hoytsville, bracketed by King of the Mountain challenges back up to the Jordanelle and through Browns Canyon.

In the day’s final miles, racers will ride through Kimball Junction up to the Utah Olympic Park and will cut down Bear Hollow drive before a final push along Canyons Resort Drive and High Mountain Road to the finish near the Umbrella Bar in Canyons Village. Frontrunners are expected to finish around 6 p.m. A free concert with Florida-based jazz trio Honey Hounds is set to take place after the awards ceremony at 6:30 p.m.

The route, first introduced in 2012, covers 78.2 miles with 10,000 feet of climbing. Racers will leave from Main Street at approximately 12:30 p.m. and head out of the city to Brown’s Canyon with another sprint line in Kamas before zig-zagging into a 2.1-mile KOM climb through Wolf Creek Ranch. The riders will descend into Wasatch County down to Heber, entering the race’s final sprint section in Midway before the grueling six-mile climb along Pine Canyon Road up to Empire Pass. After topping out, racers will ride the switchbacking descent down Marsac Avenue and race up Main Street to the finish line.

“We’re excited to have the Tour of Utah returning to Main Street,” said mayor Andy Beerman via email. “Main Street is an iconic finish to a race that not only highlights amazing athletes, but also Utah’s most spectacular landscapes.” For more information go to TourofUtah.com.

It’s official: Deer Valley is hosting another freestyle World Cup this winter. The U.S. Ski and Snowboard sent out a press release confirming the FIS winter schedule, including the Intermountain Healthcare Freestyle International, on Feb. 6-8. The Freestyle International will include moguls, aerials and dual moguls competitions, with a viewing area at the top of Deer Valley’s Burns and Snowflake lifts above Snow Park Lodge. This year will be the 20th that Deer Valley has hosted the event, which has become a favorite of athletes and spectators.

“Deer Valley is honored to have been selected as a venue for another freestyle skiing World Cup and to be able to continue our long tradition of hosting these international competitions,” said Emily Summers, a spokeswoman for Deer Valley in an email. “We are looking forward to welcoming the mogul and aerial teams back to Deer Valley in 2020.”

The resort was the host site for the 2019 World Championships and has a storied past in freestyle skiing. It was where Jonny Moseley performed the Dinner Roll during the 2002 Olympics, spurring a rules change to allow inversions, and where Mikael Kingsbury became the winningest moguls skier in history last year.

The event is particularly pertinent to the U.S. freestyle teams, which are based out of Park City and consider the venue their home turf. At the World Championships in February, Americans Brad Wilson and Jaelin Kauf both medaled in dual moguls.

The U.S. Alpine team will host the HomeLight Killington Cup on Nov. 30 through Dec. 1 in Vermont. That event is followed on the Alpine calendar by Birds of Prey at Beaver Creek in Colorado on Dec. 6 through 8.

In cross-country skiing, the Fastenal Parallel 45 Winter Festival in Minneapolis will be held over four days in March, including a music festival, panel discussions and the first cross-country World Cup to come to the U.S. in 19 years. The longstanding drought was broken thanks to the U.S. team’s performance at the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Games, where Jessie Diggins and Kikkan Randall took home the nation’s first-ever gold.

The World Cup cross-country freestyle sprint event will be held on March 17, and will act as the second leg of a mini sprint tour that begins in Quebec City the weekend before.

The freeskiing and snowboarding World Cup halfpipe season is scheduled to begin at Copper Mountain on Dec. 11-14.

On Jan. 29 to Feb. 1, skiers and boarders will compete in slopestyle and halfpipe at Mammoth Mountain in California. One more major freeski and snowboarding event will be added to the U.S. calendar in the coming weeks, the press release stated.

“Fans of ski and snowboard sports have a lot to look forward to in the coming season, especially here in the U.S.,” said U.S. Ski and Snowboard President and CEO Tiger Shaw in the press release. “We have the cross-country World Cup coming back to America for the first time in nearly 20 years with the event in Minneapolis in March. That is going to be an awesome event, giving Jessie Diggins, Sophie Caldwell, Sadie Bjornsen and their teammates (including Park City’s Rosie Brennan) the opportunity to race at World Cup level on home soil for the first time in their careers, in front of thousands of people.”

Market Reports:

Water Fun

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 07, 2019

Summer is in full swing and with school starting just around the corner, Park City Magazine shares 13 cool spots for a hot day. Swimming equals all-day entertainment, exercise, and unplugged family bonding. Here’s the lowdown on splash-worthy spots.

Au Naturel

Nearby Reservoirs stateparks.utah.gov/parks/

For a refreshing dip, head to Deer Creek, Jordanelle, Echo, and Rockport. “Rockapulco” (Rockport) usually has the warmest temps, while Jordanelle is the coldest—but also deepest and most scenic—and boasts the Aqua x Zone (435.962.9663, aquaxzone.com), an inflatable watersports Wibit.

Bloods Lake, Bonanza Flat Park at the new lot on Guardsman Pass (one mile east of the old pullout) for an easy-ish, 1.7-mile hike to the small, clean lake. County leash laws are in effect.

Smith and Morehouse Reservoir, Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Oakley, 435.783.4338, fs.usda.gov/uwcnfA long reservoir with calm waters, gorgeous views, fishing, and the occasional rope swing left by locals.

Local Pools
Basin Recreation Fieldhouse, 1388 Center Dr, 435.655.0999, basinrecreation.org
Power through laps in the outdoor pool, hot tub it, or play on the free splash pad. A pool lifeguard is usually on duty.
Ecker Hill Aquatic Center, 2465 Kilby Rd, 435.645.5617, pcschools.us/community/aquatic-center
Go indoors for an eight-lane lap pool, diving, SCUBA, and stand-up paddleboard yoga classes and a small pool for littles. Ecker isn’t a lounging place, but a lifeguard is on duty, so you can drop off kids (over age 12).
The MARC (Park City Municipal Athletic and Recreation Center), 1200 Little Kate Rd, 435.615.5400, parkcity.org
Cool off at this family-friendly, outdoor leisure pool with a slide, a hot tub, and a lazy river, plus a six-lane lap pool. Midafternoon can feel crowded.

Silver Mountain Sports Club & Spa, 1526 W Ute Blvd, Park City, 435.575.0350, silvermountainspa.com

Revel in two heated lap pools, a 65-foot waterslide, a lazy river, and indoor/outdoor hot tubs.

Nearby Aquatic Adventures

Homestead Crater, 700 North Homestead Dr, Midway, 435.657.3840, homesteadresort.com

Venture into a 55-foot-tall, 10,000-year-old limestone dome for a plunge in geothermal waters. Swim, SCUBA, snorkel, soak, or practice paddleboard yoga.

South Summit Aquatic Center (a.k.a. The Kamas Pool), 350 East 200 South, Kamas, 435.783.2423, ssafc.org
Swirl through the waterslide or enjoy the lazy river, kiddie splash area, lap pool, and hot tub (all indoors). Closed on Sundays.

Wasatch Aquatic Center, 200 East 800 South, Heber, 435.654.3450, wasatch.edu/aquatic

This indoor facility recently added a leisure pool with slides and features to the existing lap and therapy pools, plus an outdoor splash pad.Looking for another way to cool off, here are some tips for where to drop a line and get a post-river bite for yourself. It’s not hard to get hooked on fly-fishing: the peace of watching a fly floating on the surface of a gently swirling eddy, the thrill of the catch (and release) when silver flashes and your line goes tight, and the pure enjoyment of being one with nature standing in a crystalline river.

MIDDLE GROUND

The Middle Provo River is one of Utah’s finest blue-ribbon fisheries, stretching from Jordanelle to Deer Creek Reservoirs. Great public access is only a 15-minute drive from Park City. Take UT-224 out of Park City to US Hwy 40 East, travel nine miles, and turn right at the light at River Road. Two fisherman’s access areas are right there (one on the right, one on the left) with parking, portable restrooms, and lots of other fishers to swap tales with. You’ll catch brown, cutthroat, and rainbow trout on this beautiful, braided section of river, with lots of easy spots to fish from shore or by shallow wading (depending on water flow). Flies and lures only. Best bets: PMDs, caddis in the evenings, and grasshoppers in late summer.

FARM-TO-TABLE EATS

You’d be happy simply lounging on the deck of the restored, 80-year-old ranch house of Back 40 Ranch House Grill, taking in the beautiful, pastoral views of the Heber/Midway Valley while sipping nothing but the water from their own artesian aquifer, but … with so many farm-to-table, locally sourced ingredients, you’d be remiss if you didn’t order, say, the smoked jalapeño cheddar burger made with beef from the Circle Bar Ranch two pastures away and artisan cheddar from nearby Heber Valley Cheese. Wash it back with a local cold brew from the full bar menu. 1223 US Hwy 40, Heber City, 435.654.3070, back40utah.com 

GET YOUR FEET WET

Each summer Monday evening at 5 p.m. (until Labor Day), Jans Mountain Outfitters hosts free, beginner fly-casting lessons at the ponds at lower Deer Valley (next to the gazebo). You don’t need a reservation, but call ahead and let them know you’re coming so they can bring enough rods (bring your own if you have one). Typically, you’ll end up with a group of 8 to 10 new anglers perfecting their “10 o’clock, 2 o’clock” casting technique. Then, book a guided trip with the fine folks at Jans or Trout Bum 2 for a true fly-fishing experience on a local river. Jans Mountain Outfitters, 1600 Park Ave, 435.649.4949, jans.com; Trout Bum 2, 4343 Hwy 224, 435.658.1166, troutbum2.com.

WHET YOUR APPETITE

After learning how to cast more beautifully than Brad Pitt in A River Runs Through It, reward yourself with a light, lovely repast at Deer Valley Grocery Café. Sit on the outside deck and check out the duckies and stand-up paddleboarders floating by. Mouthwatering faves are the BLT with maple bacon, tomato, artisan greens, and tarragon aioli on toasted nine-grain bread or the open-face albacore tuna melt with local cumin-spiced cheddar, vine-ripened tomato, and cracked grain mustard on sprouted wheat berry bread. DVGC also carries a plethora of gourmet to-go items if you want to pack a picnic. 2250 Deer Valley Dr, 435.615.2400, deervalley.com

WADE “THE WEBE”

Image: Courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (cc by 4.0)Known as an “urban fishery” since the Weber River runs parallel to I-84 and I-80, a lot of the Weber is private access only, but anglers can enjoy several nice stretches of tailwater with lots of brown trout and mountain whitefish. Try the Creamery Lane access in Coalville (20 minutes from Park City). From I-80 east, take exit 162. Travel west on Icy Springs Road (SR-280) for 0.2 miles. Turn left and travel south on the frontage road that parallels I-80 for approximately 1.3 miles. Cross over Hobson Lane and continue traveling south on the frontage road for an additional 1.4 miles to reach this access point. Flies and lures only. Best bet: caddis.

SWEET FAMILY FUN

The iconic, family-friendly Taggart’s Grill is located in a log house nestled in a beautiful canyon between Morgan and Henefer. Summer grounds are lovely with wandering peacocks and, well, if you didn’t see any fish on your own expedition, a koi pond. Warning: no kids under 16 on the patio due to rattlesnake danger! How’s that for adventure? Taggart’s doesn’t take reservations, so expect a bit of a well-worth-it wait. Try the creamy chicken mushroom artichoke soup, the red chili poppers stuffed with cream cheese and jalapeño sauce, or the shrimp scampi primavera. Save room for the decadent selection of swoon-worthy, homemade desserts. 1105 Taggart Lane, Morgan, 801.829.3837, taggartsgrill.com

Before You Go

License to Fish - Anyone older than 12 must purchase a license to fish in Utah. Purchase one at any of our local fly-fishing shops, Walmart, by downloading the Utah Hunting and Fishing NICUSA app, or online at wildlife.utah.gov. Nonresident three-day license, $24; Utah residents, $16.

Fishing Buddies - Join High Country Fly Fishers (highcountryflyfishers.com), the local chapter of the national Trout Unlimited organization, and be privy to monthly activities including fly-tying classes, guest speakers, women’s-only events, group fishing outings, social hours, conservation activities, and more.

Support a Cause - The 5,000-member-strong Utah Stream Access Coalition works to “promote and assist in all aspects of securing and maintaining public access to Utah’s public waters and streambeds per Utah law.” In other words, if someone builds a McMansion streamside, fishers should still be able to respectfully and politely fish the water in the middle of the stream (without infringing on the private property owner’s turf). (utahstreamaccess.org)

Looking to stay dry - here are some Farmer's Markets that will keep you busy and your tummy full.

DOWNTOWN SALT LAKE FARMERS’ MARKET - Saturdays at the Downtown Salt Lake Farmers Market is the oldest and the largest. Local only farmers and producers offer the freshest local fruits and vegetables as well as a wide variety of grass-fed meats, eggs, dairy, honey, flowers… It’s a busy crowd, so for less stress and first dibs on the good stuff, arrive early, and even better, come on two-wheels and take advantage of their bike valet services. Accepts DUFB. Saturdays, Now – October 19, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m., Historic Pioneer Park, SLC.

LIBERTY PARK MARKET - The Liberty Park Farmers Market helps support local farms and businesses by bringing fresh local produce directly to the Liberty Wells community. A smaller more intimate market experience, offering a handful of fresh produce vendors, eggs and honey, as well as arts and craft vendors. Accepts DUFB. Fridays, Now – October, 4 pm., until dusk, Liberty Park, SLC.

SUGAR HOUSE FARMERS’ MARKET - Going since 2010, the Sugar House Farmers Market has been meeting up at Fairmont Park, with a handful of local food, artists, and fresh produce vendors. It is laid back and casual, a stage with live entertainment is set up for those to walk by or gather around to enjoy. This market is a little hidden gem in the heart of a quickly developing area, so opt for taking the S-Line or Parley’s Trail instead of driving and make an evening out of it. Wednesdays, July -September, 5 p.m. -8 p.m., Fairmont Park, 1040 E Sugarmont Dr., Sugar House.

SUNNYVALE FARMERS’ MARKET - The Sunnyvale Farmers Market is backed by New Roots of Salt Lake City – a subsidiary program of the IRC or International Rescue Committee. Participating farmers gain access to land and are then able to sell their produce at the Sunnyvale Farmers Market. Specializing in ethnic crops, many locally grown vegetables (bean leaves, amaranth, red and daikon radishes, lambsquarter, solanum and pumpkin shoots) are impossible to find at conventional markets and are highly desirable to those who love them. The market also includes a food pantry, free kids lunch and activities, music and is a safe gathering space for all. Saturdays from 12 – 2 p.m. Sunnyvale Park, 4013 S. 700 West, SLC.

WHEELER FARM FARMERS’ MARKET - Sunday mornings are even better if you get out to the Historical Wheeler Farm and peruse their open market. They’ve got a variety of local vendors, food trucks and artisans, and another big draw—lots of open space to park, stroll, picnic, take a peek inside the barn, touch a pig’s wet snout or take a tractor ride. Very kid friendly. Sundays, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., 6351 S. 900 East, Murray.

PARK SILLY MARKET - The Park Silly Market comes out of hibernation on Sunday, June 2nd. More than 200,000 people are expected to join in the madness this summer as local vendors transform Main Street into an event space. Make room for the lasso-throwing stilt walkers, revelers should be pleased to know that their environmental impact will be minimized through a rigid recycling program and food scraps donated to lucky pigs in Kamas. Sundays, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Main Street, Park City. 

PETERSON FARM MARKET - With a farm established by Farmer Luke Peterson’s Great Great Grandfather and planted in 1871, Food Truck Friday welcomes you to visit the farm and fuel up with dinner provided by a variety of mobile food vendors. While you’re there, the Peterson Market partners up with other Utah growers and food artisans, allowing you to shop and support local commerce. Food Truck Friday starts at 5 p.m., the Peterson Farm Market is open Monday – Saturday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and til 9 p.m. on Fridays. 11887 South 4000 West, Riverton.

Showings In Utah

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 31, 2019

This week we wanted to share 4 Steps to Take Before a Home Showing and where to catch an outdoor movie before the summer ends.

Buyers want to know exactly what they're getting when purchasing a home. As it's a major investment, all potential homebuyers will want to inspect your entire property while keeping an eye out for any signs of damage. What can you do to make sure your home is ready for public scrutiny? Here's what you need to know:

Thoroughly Clean the Home - Before the showing, you should have your home thoroughly cleaned. This means dusting, vacuuming and taking out the trash. It may also mean taking steps to remove smoke or other odors from the air. If walls or other surfaces have mold on them, be sure to clean them prior to an open house. In addition to increasing the odds that someone makes an offer, taking the time to eliminate mold will go a long way toward reducing the risk of potential buyers getting sick.

Take Time to Stage the Home - Prospective buyers want to get an idea as to how a given space within a home can be used. For instance, they may want to see if there's enough room for their bed in the master bedroom or if there's enough room for the couch in the living room. If you have a finished attic or basement, be sure to showcase it as a space a buyer can make good use of.

Remove Potentially Offensive Items - When you show a house, you want to present a neutral look to potential buyers. This may mean getting rid of posters that make political or religious references. You may also want to hide items with sports logos, especially if you live in an area where rivalries are huge. By doing so, you will allow those who visit your home to imagine themselves living in the space without having anything to cloud their vision.

Make Necessary Repairs Before an Open House - If you're planning on making repairs prior to selling the home, do them before allowing anyone to see the space. For instance, you may want to repair the leaking water heater or replace shingles that have fallen off the roof as soon as possible. You should also make sure the garage door opens and closes properly and that all of the lights work.

If you want to sell your home in a timely manner, you must know how to prepare the space for public viewing. Making repairs, removing offensive items and properly staging the property may all increase the odds of selling your home. By taking these steps before a showing, you may very well increase a buyer’s confidence that the home is worth putting an offer on.

The weather in Utah is amazing and before the summer ends here are some places to watch movies in Utah's great outdoors. Arrive early for a good spot and bring blankets, chairs and bug spray. Movies are free and begin at dusk, unless otherwise noted - always check the website before heading out for some of the movies with a further drive time.

The Gateway

July 31: “Despicable Me”

Aug. 7: “Incredibles 2”

Aug. 14: “10 Things I Hate About You”

The Gateway in downtown Salt Lake will be showing a movie every Wednesday night this summer. Bring a blanket and enjoy free popcorn and movies. You can buy food and drinks at The Gateway and enter to win drawings for DVDs and gift cards. All movies will be held at the Olympic Plaza at The Gateway, 10 N. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City. The plaza opens at 7:30 p.m., and movies begin at sunset. For more information, visit shopthegateway.com.

Draper SunCrest

Aug. 3: “Princess and the Frog”

Aug. 9: “The House With a Clock in Its Walls”

Enjoy movies under the stars hosted by SunCrest in Draper. Movies begin at dusk at Village Green Park, 2016 E. Village Green Circle, Draper. For more information, visit facebook.com/suncrestoa.

Kearns

Aug. 2: “Smallfoot,” Chomper’s Cove

Kearns’ Friday Night Flicks hosted by the Kearns Oquirrh Park Fitness Center and the Utah Olympic Oval is back for the summer. Doors open at 8 p.m. and the movies start at sundown. All movies will be held at KOPFC, 5624 Cougar Lane, Kearns. For Chomper’s Cove movies, enter through the south gate. For Park Pavilion movies, enter through the main entrance. Visit kopfc.com for more information.

Magna

Aug. 2: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”

Aug. 9: “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World”

Every Friday night, you can come hear free live music followed by a movie in the park. The movie for Aug. 16 hasn’t been announced yet. All events begin at 8 p.m. at Pleasant Green Park, 3270 S. 8400 West, Magna. For more information, visit magnautah.org.

Millcreek

Aug. 2: “Little Rascals Silent Shorts,” Evergreen Park, 2266 E. Evergreen Ave.

Venture Out invites you and your family to enjoy outdoor movies as well as activities, live music, food trucks and more. Activities start at 6 p.m. and movies begin at dusk. For more information, visit ventureout.org.

Murray

Aug 9: “Bumblebee,” Ken Price Ballpark, 270 E. Vine St.

Murray City is showing outdoor movies all summer with food trucks and concessions available. All movies are free, but you need to reserve seats online at mcreg.com for the June 28 and July 19 movies. All movies start at 9 p.m. For more information, visit murray.utah.gov.

Riverton

Aug 2: “Leave No Trace”

Aug. 9: “Incredibles 2”

Aug. 16: “The House With a Clock in its Walls”

Aug. 23: “Dumbo”

Come enjoy food trucks, vendors, entertainment and games before the movies. Friday Fun Nights will be from 6-9 p.m. followed by the movie at dusk for all dates except the first two. The first movie will take place outside the Riverton Hospital, and the second will be held in conjunction with Town Days. All movies but the first will be at Riverton City Park, 12600 S. 1450 West, Riverton. For more information, visit rivertoncity.com.

Snowbird

Aug. 2: “Grease”

Aug. 9: “Goonies”

Watch free movies up in the mountains on Friday nights. Concessions will be available at The Birdfeeder. Movies begin at dusk and will be at the Snowbird Center Plaza Deck, 9385 S. Snowbird Center Drive. For more information, visit snowbird.com

South Jordan

Aug. 9: “Babe,” County Polo Field, 2100 W. 11400 South

Participate in themed activities and stay for the movie afterward. Festivities begin at 7:30 p.m., and the movies begin at dusk. For more information, visit sjc.utah.gov.

Taylorsville

Aug. 10: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”

The first movie will be a part of Taylorsville Dayzz and will be held at the Valley Regional Park at 9:30 p.m. All other movies will be at dusk at City Hall, 2600 W. Taylorsville Blvd. For more information, visit taylorsvilleut.gov.

West Valley City

Aug. 9: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”

The first movie will be a part of WestFest, June 13-16. There will be popcorn and concessions available. All movies will start at dusk at Centennial Park, 5405 W. 3100 South. For more information, visit wvc-ut.gov.

Hyde Park

Aug. 10: “Incredibles 2”

Once a month this summer, Hyde Park will be showing a free family movie in the park. All movies start at dusk at Lee Park, 200 W. Center, Hyde Park, Cache County. For more information, visit hydepark.utahlinks.org.

Bountiful

Aug. 10: “Mary Poppins Returns”

Join the South Davis Recreation Center for free family movie nights. Popcorn, nachos and drinks will be available to purchase. The events start at 8:30 p.m., and the movie begins at dusk at 550 N. 200 West, Bountiful. For more information, visit southdavisrecreation.com.

Centerville

Aug. 2: “Peter Rabbit”

Aug. 9: “Incredibles 2”

Centerville’s Movies in the Park open to the whole family. All movies start at 9 p.m. at Smith Park, 300 N. 100 East, Centerville. For more information, visit centervilleut.net.

Kaysville

Aug. 16: “Smallfoot”

Kaysville’s Movies in the Park has food trucks, a splash pad and, of course, movies. The event begins at 9 p.m. and will be at Heritage Park, 250 N. Fairfield Road, Kaysville. For more information, visit kaysvillecity.com.

Layton

Aug. 2: “The Emperor’s New Groove”

Aug. 9: “Matilda”

Aug. 23: “You’ve Got Mail”

Aug. 30: “Guardians of the Galaxy”

Davis Arts’ Free Friday Film Series uses an outdoor LED screen so they don’t have to wait to start until dusk. There will be different pre-movie activities each Friday starting at 6:30 p.m. All movies begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Kenley Amphitheater, 403 N. Wasatch Drive, Layton. For more information, visit davisarts.org.

Nephi

Aug. 16: “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World”

Bring your blankets and lawn chairs and enjoy movies in the Nephi City Park, 600 N. Main. Concessions will be available to purchase. For more information, visit nephi.utah.gov.

Monticello

Aug. 2: “Smallfoot,” Pioneer Park, 9165 Fallon Ave.

Aug. 16: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part,” Montiview Park, 5980 Jason Ave.

Monticello Movies in the Park will be happening this August. Bring blankets and chairs and the whole family. Movies start at dusk. For more information, visit monticellocommunitycenter.com.

Park City

Aug. 10: “Storm Boy,” Prospector Square Lot K, 1920 Prospector Ave.

Basin Recreation will be hosting outdoor movies in various locations this summer. On Aug. 23, there will be outdoor movies at Trailside Park, 5715 Trailside Drive, though voting is still open for which titles will be shown. The Aug. 10 movie will be a drive-in and costs $9. For more information, visit parkcityfilm.org.

Vernal

Aug. 9: “Captain Marvel”

Uintah Recreation District is putting on its summer Movie in the Park series again. All movies will start at dusk and will be held at the Uintah Community Center, 610 S. Vernal Ave., Vernal. For more information, visit uintahrecreation.org.

Lehi

Aug. 2: “Incredibles 2”

Aug. 9: “Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back”

Thanksgiving Point’s Outdoor Movie Series is back this year with a great series of movies. Concessions will be available to purchase. Admission is free for Thanksgiving Point members, $20 for adults and $15 for children ages 3-12 and seniors. All movies will be at the Waterfall Amphitheatre in Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi. For more information, visit thanksgivingpoint.org.

Lindon

Aug. 6: “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” Pioneer Park, 150 S. 500 East

Movies in the Park in Lindon will be hosted by the Bank of Utah and Lindon Parks and Recreation this year. All movies are free and begin at dusk. For more information, visit lindonrecreation.org.

Orem

Aug. 7: “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald”

Aug 14: “Incredibles 2”

SCERA Shell Outdoor Theatre’s Movies Under the Stars series shows outdoor movies on a large screen in the shell amphitheatre. Tickets are $4 for adults and $3 for children ages 3-11 and seniors. Passes to all six movies are $12 for adults and $9 for children and seniors. The amphitheater is at 699 S. State, Orem. For more information, visit scera.org.

Pleasant Grove

Aug 9: “Aquaman,” City Pool, 532 S. 300 E St.

Join the Pleasant Grove Recreation Center for outdoor movies. Games and prizes start at 8 p.m. The first two will be at Pleasant Grove Recreation Center, 547 S. Locust Ave., Pleasant Grove. For more information, visit plgrove.org.

Hurricane

Aug. 3: “Wonder Park”

Aug. 17: “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World”

Sept. 14: “Captain Marvel”

Sept. 28: “Dumbo”

Enjoy movies at the pool and the park all summer long. The June 15 and Aug. 3 movies will be held at the City Pool, 750 N. 200 West. The rest will be at the Community Center, 63 S. 100 West, Hurricane, Washington County. For more information, visit hurricanerecreation.com.

St. George

Aug. 9: “Footloose”

Aug. 23: “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”

Sunset on the Square in St. George is happening every second and fourth Friday this summer at the St. George Town Square. Bring blankets and lawn chairs to see these free and family-friendly movies. All movies will be held at 50 S. Main., St. George, at dusk. For more information, visit sgcity.org.

Ogden

Aug. 5: “Ralph Breaks the Internet”

Aug. 12: “Remember the Titans”

Aug. 19: “Who Framed Roger Rabbit”

Monday Night Movies are back with a broad range of movies. The Backstage Bistro will be open for food purchases. Movies begin at 7:30 p.m., at the Ogden Amphitheater, 343 25th St. For more information, visit ogdencity.com.

Huntsville

Aug. 5: “Avengers: Infinity War”

Comment on this story Go up to the mountains and enjoy free movies from Snowbasin Resort. Starting at 6 p.m., there will be Kid’s Zone activities, mini golf and food available to purchase. Movies begin at dusk at Earl’s Lodge Lawn, 3925 E. Snowbasin Road, Huntsville, Weber County. For more information, visit snowbasin.com.

Pioneer Day

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 23, 2019

 

How is Utah celebrating Pioneer Day? With parades, fireworks and music — and, for some, pie and beer. Here, in chronological order, is a listing of the major events — and a few minor ones — tied to the Pioneer Day holiday.

 

Days of ’47 Cowboy Games & Rodeo. Utah State Fairpark, 1000 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City. Events start at 8 p.m. each night. Tickets, from $14 to $59 per night, at Smith’s Tix.

Ogden PRCA Rodeo. Ogden Pioneer Stadium, 668 17th Street, Ogden. Starts at 7:30 p.m. each night. Tickets, from $15 to $30 per night, at Smith’s Tix.

Fiesta Days Rodeo, with PRCA Xtreme Bull Riding on Saturday. Spanish Fork Fairgrounds Arena, 475 S. Main, Spanish Fork. Starts 8 p.m. each night. Tickets, starting at $7, at www.sfcitytix.org.

Deseret News Marathon. Marathon starts at the top of Big Mountain, above Emigration Canyon; half-marathon starts at the top of Little Mountain; 10K starts at Research Park, 500 Wakara Way, University of Utah campus, Salt Lake City; 5K starts at Wasatch Elementary School, 1150 E. South Temple, Salt Lake City. Start times are 5:50 a.m. (marathon and half-marathon), 6 a.m. (10K) and 7 a.m. (5K). Registration fees are $85 (marathon), $75 (half-marathon), $45 (10K), and $35 for adults, $12 for youth 14 and under (5K).

Sunrise Service, with music performed by the Salt Lake Valley Combined Institute Choir and organist Linda Margetts. The Assembly Hall on Temple Square, 50 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City. Service begins at 7 a.m.; guests must be seated by 6:50 a.m. Free, no ticket required.

Pioneer Day Celebration. Willow Park, 450 W. 700 South, Logan. Activities include a fun run at 7 a.m., parade at noon, live music in the evening, and fireworks at 10 p.m. Free.

Days of ’47 Parade. Runs through downtown Salt Lake City, starting at South Temple ad State Street, moving east to 200 East, then south to 900 South, then east to 600 East, ending at Liberty Park. Parade starts at 9 a.m. Free to sit along the parade route; be mindful of private property; many people camp out overnight for good spots.

Ogden Pioneer Days Grand Parade, along Washingon Boulevard fro 31st Street to 20th Street. Starts at 9 a.m. Free.

Fiesta Days Grand Parade. Center Street and Main Street, Spanish Fork. Parade starts at 9 a.m. Free. Followed by a craft fair, carnival and entertainment, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., City Park, 49 S. Main St.; concert with country musician Charley Jenkins, at Sports Park, 295 Volunteer Drive, at 8 p.m., followed by fireworks at 10:30 p.m.

Pioneer Day at Antelope Island State Park, west of Ogden. Activities start at 10 a.m. Free.

NACIP Powwow and Festival. Liberty Park, 600 East and 900 South, Salt Lake City. Starts at noon, runs into the night, with fireworks at 10 p.m. Admission is $5, or free for people under 3 and over 65.

Pie and Beer Day. Beer Bar, 161 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City. Activities from 2 to 6 p.m. Presented by KUAA-FM and the Utah Arts Alliance. Admission is $25; must be 21 or older.

Layton Pioneer Day. Layton Commons Park, 437 N. Wasatch Dr., Layton. Food from 4 to 7 p.m.; concert by Riders in the Sky (at Ed Kenley Centennial Amphitheater, 403 N. Wasatch Dr., Layton), Electric Light Parade at 10 p.m., with party to follow. Free.

Looking for other upcoming outdoor Summer Soirées - check out these Farm to Table, Chef-curated, locally sourced dinners flourish—with altitude.

Hearth and Hill Copper Moose Farm Stand Dinners

July 27, August 16, September 14, 2019 coppermoosefarm.com/events

Hearth and Hill Chef Jordan Harvey is bringing the table to the farm as local chefs—and a petite gathering of diners—tuck into homegrown eats at Copper Moose Farm Stand. “We want the dinners to stand out and be something special,” Harvey says. “You can go to all of these restaurants in Park City anytime, but we wanted to bring the chefs in and create a really unique event.” The three intimate events are $200 per person and limited to 20 people, which covers a cocktail hour, passed hors d’oeuvres, and a multicourse dinner with wine pairings. The chef-hosts include Ashley and Vanessa Chapman of Main Street Social, Adam Ross from Twisted Fern, and Phil Grubisa from Beltex Meats.

Copper Moose Harvest Dinner

August 10, 2019 coppermoosefarm.com/events

This once-a-year dinner is held in the fields of Copper Moose Farm (1285 Old Ranch Rd). Surrounded by crops and greenhouses, five chefs each execute a different course for a crowd of about 100 people ($230 per person). Diners are treated to live music, farm-inspired cocktails from Alpine Distilling, and wine pairings. “At Copper Moose, we grow great produce, but we also have this great group of chefs around us who are food nerds in their own areas,” says farm manager Daisy Fair. “To bring it all home on-site at a farm feels just right.”

100 Mile Meal to Benefit Recycle Utah

August 10, 2019 recycleutah.org/events/100-mile-meal

From the fruits (even cocktail garnishes) and herbs to the meat and bread, every ingredient used at this annual event is sourced from within 100 miles of Park City. Held on a private farm in Oakley, the culinary team from Park City Mountain will create a five-course meal for 160 guests ($200 per person, $1,500 for a table). The goal of the event, says Recycle Utah’s Haley Lebsack, is to share how delicious eating local can be. “Not only are you decreasing your environmental impact by eating local, you are also supporting your neighbors, community leaders, and friends,” she says. “My favorite part of this event is that we invite the farmers who donate food to join us, so guests can get to know the men and women who helped to produce this amazing meal.”

 

Family Time

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 17, 2019

Warm days and cool nights add to the magic of Park City and enjoying that time with your family is hands down the greatest gift. So, the Wife and I wanted to share a great article from Ski Utah on how to Spend 36 hours in SLC's Mountains as a Family - You have a total of 36 hours to spend in Salt Lake City mountains, so what are you going to do?! 36 hours isn’t a lot of time for a mountain adventure-loving family, but it is enough time to have a fantastic adventure. Here are a few things you can do with 36 hours in SLC when you like a little bit of adventure with the kiddos!

Hike the Wasatch National Forest - If you love the mountains, Wasatch National Forest is super close to Salt Lake City and offers HUNDREDS of hikes. Here are links to stories about our favorite trails:

Enjoy Resort Activities - When you don’t have a lot of time for mountain adventures, but still want to be close to nature, book a stay in the mountains and enjoy the activities there.
  • Solitude Mountain Resort: During the summer months, you can take scenic chair lift rides, go hiking, biking, enjoy a game of disc golf, or visit culinary events. Stay at one of the many options that Solitude offers for lodging. Free yoga every Saturday and free concerts every Sunday in the Village.
  • Brighton: There's no lack of scenic trails at Brighton. Visit lakes Catherine, Mary and Martha or take a simple stroll around Silver Lake with the family. Brighton serves food too, so grab a bite before heading back down the canyon.
  • Alta Ski Area: There's no secret that the locals love to hike at Alta in the summer to enjoy the wildflowers and cool air. Park at Wildcat and take a $5/person shuttle up the Summer Road for easier access. Want a mountain retreat? Book a night at Alta Lodge or The Snowpine Lodge.
  • Snowbird: the mecca for summer adventures. Purchase an activities pass for all day adventure and access to the ropes course, mountain coaster, climbing wall, alpine slide, Tram, Peruvian Chairlift and more.
Take a Scenic Drive- Sometimes, the best adventures are just getting in your car with an old school map and just driving. In fact, it's even more of an adventure if you get a little “lost.” This is especially fun with kids. Try it during the evening or early morning.

Here are a few drives to get lost on:

  • Big Cottonwood Canyon - Head all the way to the top of Guardsman Pass. Here you'll find beautiful views down BCC and into Park City. Take a quick hike to Bloods Lake - very family friendly.
  • Little Cottonwood Canyon - Park at the Wildcat base area of Alta Ski Area and opt for a quick hike around. Watch for moose and be careful where you step -- please don't damage the wildflowers!
  • Mirror Lake Highway - Head east from Kamas through the national forest. It takes about an hour and a half each way. The temperatures are usually 10 - 20 degrees cooler than the valley and will often be below freezing at night, even in the summer months. So bring a jacket. You'll also want to stop at the Mirror Lake Diner for a farm fresh meal.
  • Ogden Canyon - SR - 39 will take you to Pineview Reservoir. A great place for water-skiing, fishing, and paddle boarding.
  • Provo Canyon - Make a stop at Sundance Mountain Resort. Grab a picnic lunch from The Deli, stretch your legs and jump back in the car to find the perfect picnic spot.
Camp in Big or Little Cottonwood Canyon- Both the Spruces Campground (Big Cottonwood) and Tanner's Flat and Albion Basin (Little Cottonwood) are excellent family camp spots. Book your sites early and bring the s'mores. There are endless activities surrounding these campsites and they provide a break from the valley heat. For help on sleeping comfortably outside with little ones, visit Brooke's story about, well, just that!

Looking for musical options in town, Park City Magazine shares A Music-Lover’s Guide to the Packed Summer Concert Scene. Not too long ago, live music was an occasional occurrence in Park City. Today, the town’s robust summer concert calendar means serious tunes virtually every day of the week. From 5,000-person mega shows at Deer Valley Resort’s amphitheater to bitty gigs in pocket parks, here’s our can’t-miss summer music list.

Deer Valley Concert Series @ Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater

June 30–September 7 deervalleyconcertseries.com

Pack your cheese and charcuterie, and head to the slopes for this big-name series. Now in its second season, the lineup ranges from Michael Franti & Spearhead to fan-favorite Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, plus British indie rockers Squeeze. BYO snacks and sips, or preorder a gourmet picnic.

Deer Valley Music Festival @ Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater

June 28–August 10 deervalleymusicfestival.org

Utah Symphony | Utah Opera flees the city for this annual, 19-show extravaganza. Settle in for tunes ranging from Disney classics to chamber music to pop paired with symphonic sound—everything from Kristen Chenoweth of Wicked fame and The Music of the Rolling Stones to a tribute to Aretha Franklin and the beloved Patriotic Celebration.

Main and Farmer’s Market Stages @ Park Silly Sunday Market

Sundays, June 2–September 22 (except August 4–18) parksillysundaymarket.com

Cut loose on Main Street at this massive weekly event, featuring artisans, local eats, a beer and Bloody Mary garden, and a vast array of entertainers—from strolling opera singers to full-fledged bands. Tunes are performed on two stages: full bands on Main, and smaller, solo performances on the Farmers Market Stage near the Post Office.

Noches De Verano @ City Park

Monday evenings, June 3–July 1 mountaintownmusic.org

From salsa to mariachi to Mexican folk, experience a mini festival celebrating Latino culture at City Park on select summer Mondays. Get up and groove to the sounds of Gente X Norteña Band or sizzling Rumba Libre, or just chill in the quintessential old Park City ambience. Latino art and a taco truck round out the celebration.

Hops on the Hill @ Stein Eriksen Lodge

Tuesday evenings, July 9–August 27 steinlodge.com/hops.html

Craft brews and curated bites pair with live music at this midmountain Deer Valley alfresco series. For $20, get Chef Zane Holmquist’s sweet and savory nibbles partnered with $20 craft beer pairings, both served from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Stein’s outdoor deck. Listen to tunes, ranging from acoustic harmonies to sophisticated jazz, on the adjacent lawn for free; à la carte eats and drinks also available.

Music on the Patio @ Park City Library

Wednesdays at 11 a.m., June 19–August 28 mountaintownmusic.org

Whether you’re checking out books or looking for a midday break, the library’s patio is the place on Wednesdays. Grab a coffee at Lucky Ones and watch solo artists perform free, intimate concerts.

Grand Valley Bank Community Concert Series @ Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater

Wednesday evenings, June 19–August 21 mountaintownmusic.org

This free, family-friendly, community tradition is all about kicking back, catching up with friends, and taking in some solid tunes. Don’t miss popular acts, such as Muddpuddle (June 19), Pixie and The Partygrass Boys (July 10), and Jägertown (July 17), as well as a community jam session on August 21. Pack snacks and low chairs.

Grand Lawn @ DeJoria Center

Thursday evenings, June 27–August 1 (No show July 4) dejoriacenter.com

In nearby Kamas, find a hopping outdoor concert scene on the lawn. From blues bands and country duos to funky jazz and rock ’n’ roll, the diverse lineup suits the laid-back, country setting. Low chairs, snacks, and blankets welcome. No outside alcohol allowed. State Road Tavern open for dinner and drinks (concessions available, too).

Summer Concert Series @ Canyons Village

Thursdays and Saturdays at 6 p.m., July 6–August 29 parkcitymountain.com

Canyons Village is abuzz with surprisingly well-known artists at no ticket charge. Blitzen Trapper (August 3), Ryan Shupe & the Rubber Band (August 15), The Motet (August 24), and many more rock the Canyons outdoor stage this season. Come early to hike or bike via the gondola, before the show begins.

Park City Limits @ Silver Star Café

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings thesilverstarcafe.com

Take in music with Uinta Mountain views at this petite patio series. The acoustic dinner shows feature acts like Triggers and Slips and Hot House West playing folk, jazz, blues, Americana, and bluegrass tunes paired with top-notch eats. No cover charge, but dinner reservations are recommended as space is limited.

Mountain Town Music @ Miner’s Plaza

Saturday afternoons, June 29–August 24 mountaintownmusic.org

Catch singer-songwriters, acoustic bands, and solo artists as they take the stage at this intimate pocket park on Historic Main Street.

Park City Institute’s Big Stars, Bright Nights @ The Eccles Center for the Performing Arts

July 7–August 24 parkcityinstitute.org

An outlier in this summer’s concert scene, this popular series (formerly at Deer Valley Resort) moves inside for the 2019 season, taking advantage of PCI’s year-round 1,200-seat performing arts center. The country-heavy lineup includes The Brothers Osborne (July 7), quintet The Punch Brothers (July 30), Taj Mahal Quartet with songwriter Marc Cohn and The Blind Boys of Alabama (August 13), pop-country group Gone West (August 16), and singer CAM (August 24). Theater-quality production, cushy seats, and no rainouts also mean no BYO drinks or eats.

Local goods to pack for your picnic

Alpine Distilling Summit Gin & Preserve Liqueur

Class up your picnic by mixing local Park City Summit Gin, Preserve Liqueur, soda water, and lemon for a fresh, simple cocktail. alpinedistilling.com

Ritual Chocolate Mid Mountain Blend

End your night on a sweet note with Park City’s own bean-to-bar chocolate, which boasts a not-too-intense flavor with fruity, earthy, and floral notes. ritualchocolate.com

Heber Valley Artisan Cheese

Localize your cheese plate with cheddar, Parmesan, Swiss, or curds made in Midway.

hebervalleyartisancheese.com

Deer Valley Picnic Bag

Preorder a bag to pick up at Deer Valley’s Snow Park amphitheater. From cheese plates to beet salads and homemade pastries, bags include all the fixin’s for a gourmet feast.

deervalley.com

Reasons to Hire a Real Estate Agent

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 10, 2019

Since 2006 my wife and I have had the great pleasure of being a part of the real estate community. We represent buyers and sellers in the Greater Park City area as well as in Salt Lake City. This week we wanted to share the Top 6 Reasons to Hire a Real Estate Agent to Sell Your Home - As a homeowner, there's only so much you can do when trying to sell your home. When it comes to real estate, hiring a professional agent is more of a need than an option. A real estate agent's greatest goal is to sell your house at a higher price in a lesser number of days.

While it's possible to sell a home without representation, it's important to remember that real estate is also a legal matter. In fact, there has been a massive increase in scammers targeting real estate clients because they're fully aware that some people don't seek agent representation. If you decide to sell your house, understand that it's a heavy process with many stakes involved. Here are some reasons why hiring a real estate agent is crucial:

Years of Experience - Nothing can beat experience. As a homeowner, you might believe in relying on the internet, family or friends; however, the experience of a professional real estate agent is what will truly help you secure a worthy investment. With years of experience in cracking the real estate code, agents know the times of the year when house prices go up and when potential buyers are most active. Hiring an agent will save you the stress of learning everything about buying and selling a house.

Negotiation Skills - Experience also endows real estate agents with impressive negotiation skills. Dealing with buyers, brokers and legal representatives on a daily basis, real estate professionals know exactly what each stakeholder wants. Agents have the skills to negotiate prices well and secure a worthy investment. You'll never be disappointed after hiring a competent agent because they'll provide the best representation for your property.

Access to a Critical Database - Real estate agents have deep connections and access to crucial real estate databases. The Multiple Listing Service (MLS) is an interface of all the current homes for sale. When you hire an agent, all the information required to sell your house will be available over the MLS for other agents. Your agent can effectively advertise your property by featuring an attractive package. With instant visibility, there are far more chances of selling your house quicker than when you may have tried it on your own. With greater access to buyers, you can sell your house fast instead of waiting and lowering the price. Hiring an agent may seem costly at first, but it can give you the upper hand in steering the price of your house.

Network of Professionals - Agents can never give their best service in isolation. With experience and education, they will always have a pool of professionals that they stay in touch with for speedy selling, buying and referrals. Agents work with many other people who can directly impact the price of your property.

Knowledge of Market Conditions - Real estate professionals have to stay updated with the rising house prices, and the best times to invest in the real estate market. They have insights into the market conditions that'll eventually dictate the price at which you sell your house. There are many calculations involved when it comes to learning the real estate climate. Data like the average-per-square foot cost, average house sale prices, list-to-sold prices and how long a house stays on the market are all things that ultimately decide how fast your house sells. Learning about this can be a hefty task, especially when you have to take care of the investment and insurance. Instead of taking all the stress yourself, hire an agent to guide you accordingly. You'll save both time and money.

Confidentiality and Security - As mentioned, with scammers on the rise, it only makes sense to hire a professional who will keep all your information confidential until the deal closes. With your identity papers, bank statements and mortgages at stake, hiring an agent is critical. Sometimes, even the smoothest transactions can have issues like tax assessments and missing stamps. Missing even a single step of selling your house can come back to haunt you. Enjoy the peace of mind that follows placing your property in safe hands.

Buying and selling a house is no joke—it's a lifetime investment. While these are only a handful of reasons eliciting the importance of a real estate agent, hiring one will save you from the trouble of paperwork, taxing complications, and, most of all, fraudulent schemes.

With the beautiful weather in Park City, it is time to be outside and if you’re lucky enough to have outdoor space (even if it’s just a sliver of grass) you’ll want to make the most of it. But knowing where to start can be tricky. Here are 7 Design Ideas to Make the Most of Your Backyard:

Swinging Seat - If you have the space, consider creating a variety of seating options — the neutral color palette ties together each of these. Warning: Hanging a hammock or swinging chair means that guests will be rushing over to your place whenever they get the chance. Kids and adults alike will love kicking back with a good book and a refreshing glass of lemonade all summer long. And when in doubt: add string lights.

Family Friendly Features - This backyard allows for plenty of space to play. But despite all of the kid-friendly equipment, it still manages to look stylish. Hang a macramé piece under a covered area for a boho touch, and set out some mod chairs to keep the look current.

Comfy and Cool - How stunning is this covered patio space? The homeowners with the backyard featured in the previous photo also did an excellent job styling this seating area. We love the addition of string bulb lights (again, a backyard essential) and the fun and funky egg chair. Pillows and a throw blanket add texture and necessary warmth for chillier nights.

Festive Fire Pit - Gather round! Group your chairs around a fire pit and set out poufs for extra seating if the weather permits. You’ll have the ideal space to spend many a summer evening talking and laughing with friends and neighbors—and indulging in a s’more or two.

Poolside Perch - Lucky enough to have a pool? Add a comfy outdoor couch and chairs, and you’ll never want to leave the yard. Adults can supervise little ones while kicking back and relaxing in the shade.

Patterned Patio - Having guests over? Jazz up patio furniture with the addition of colorful throws and patterned pillows to bring a well-traveled look to your backyard space. Pattern-mixing newbie? Stick to one color palette (here: pinks, blues, browns, and whites), to tie everything together.

Kids Only - Create a special oasis for the kids by setting up an outdoor dining space that’s just their size. Giant buckets make for great toy storage (which means easy access while the adults are still eating).

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Courchevel Bistro

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 03, 2019

Judy & I had the pleasure of dinning at the new Courchevel Bistro in Old Town yesterday evening. It is the newest Talisker Club downtown dining and gathering experience. Named for Park City’s sister city in the French Alps. Courchevel is situated within the historic Coal & Lumber building on lower Main Street. And let me tell you we had an awesome dinner! Courchevel Bistro presents artfully crafted inventive European-French insured with only the freshest local ingredients. Imagine the new age cooking of the northern French Alps in wintertime to the Mediterranean Riviera region in the summers—with Utah’s four seasons matching the origins perfectly.

No, we do not work for Talisker, nor do we have any affiliation with them, I just felt compelled to let you know about this wonderful new restaurant in Park City. I was “blown away” by the food and service or I wouldn’t be writing this - by the way I spent my previous life (40 years) in food and beverage management. We had the opportunity to meet with Mike Canzano (Talisker Real Estate), who was checking in on guest and members of Talisker, as well as a chance to speak with the Executive Chef, Clement Gelas and hear his excitement of sharing culinary influences from his home country of France and the Rhone Valley. I have always enjoyed and appreciated when the Chef “works” the dining room meeting customers and explaining his thoughts behind the dishes his staff prepares - he certainly is passionate about his food and it shows.

I had the Slow Roasted Rack Of Pork after enjoying Corn Bisque and Judy had the Arctic Char Meuniere after almost licking the bowl of Risotto De Crozetes. We look forward to going back and exploring other menus items and I highly recommend you do the same! The restaurant is also open to the public. Oh yes, I almost forgot, try the Dark Chocolate with Charteuse and Fresh fruit for dessert!

Happy 4th of July! Ramon and Judy

Architecture And Design

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 26, 2019

When you think about architecture, you might imagine the timeless columns of a Grecian revival or the clean lines of a mid-century modern home. But for every classic architecture style, there are a few that didn’t quite weather the test of time. It’s why you can sometimes tell exactly when a home was built based on its architectural style alone (looking at you, 1990s ranch). The trick to transitioning from trend to style staple is choosing one or two of the elements from the style you love for your home. Resist the urge to pile all of the trends into one space. Instead, check out some of our favorite 2019 architecture trends to see which features you’d choose. These are the 2019 Architecture Trends by freshome.

Hidden tech - Smart homes are nothing new in the world of tech and design, but architects are learning to be sneakier about it. Today, technology exists as part of the home’s design instead of being its main feature. Building smart outlets or speakers directly into the home means you get all the tech you love without tripping over wires. It’s also important that tech is seen as a seamless part of life, rather than an add-on. Expect to see even more solutions to keep tech hidden, yet totally functional.

Flex design -No two families are exactly alike, so why are so many floorplans the same? The idea of flexible design is one of those 2019 architecture trends we can really get behind. After all, it just makes sense that designers would start to see that different families have different ways of doing things. The result is a flexible approach to design that leaves the details up to the homeowners. Creating rooms that pull double duty (a combination guest room and office, anyone?) or getting rid of formal, less-used spaces (bye, formal dining room!) means architects can create homes where every inch is optimized for each family.

Sustainability - Designing for sustainability isn’t anything new on the architecture scene, but the solutions architects are using are so 2019. Sustainability isn’t just about using energy-rated appliances and a few solar panels, but really considering the impact building has on the environment. With that in mind, more designers are turning to locally sourced, sustainable building materials to get started. Sustainability is being built right into the walls with more efficient fixtures and even indoor green spaces. You might not even know that your architect is a stickler for sustainability because great designers simply make it a seamless part of your build.

Smaller scale - Just a decade ago, size really mattered most when designing a home. It was all about how much square footage you could get, which is why the real estate market is packed with 1990 and early 2000 “McMansions.” These are usually homes that, while large, are often cheaply finished or cursed with small lots. It’s interesting to note that one of the most common 2019 architecture trends is choosing to build smaller. It’s not always a question of budget; homeowners are simply choosing to create smaller footprints. Not only does this leave more outdoor space, but it means easier upkeep and less maintenance. It also allows homeowners to invest in good-quality finishes and furnishings so their smaller home stands the test of time.

Segmented spaces - We all know that the open concept home has been the gold standard for the last 10 years. After decades of small, specific rooms, American families are choosing spaces that allow more room and fewer labels. But while open concept offers the most room to roam, it still has a few issues. There can be such a thing as too much openness in a home, so architects have had to learn to create defined spaces without using walls. Segmented spaces, which use architectural features like sunken rooms, varying ceiling heights and other features help to divvy up the space while keeping it open.

Outdoor living - The backyard isn’t an afterthought anymore. More architects are taking the time to design the outdoor living space as much as the indoor. Whether it’s space for a backyard barbecue, a sunny pool oasis or even just a kid’s paradise, expect to see more outdoor design in 2019. As architects consider the way families live and use their homes, it’s more apparent that outside is just as important as inside. Design a smart outdoor space and you’ll increase your home’s size without increasing square footage. What’s more, planning for outdoor space as part of the design and build means more efficient budgeting.

Modern farmhouse - For the last couple of years, the farmhouse has reigned supreme as the top trend. Homeowners love the comfortable warmth and architectural interest farmhouse design brings to the table. But there were a few drawbacks, including the risk of becoming cluttered and kitschy. That’s why we’re not surprised to see modern farmhouse take over the list of 2019 architecture trends. It takes what everyone loves about farmhouse design (warmth, character) but uses clean lines and architecture to ensure it doesn’t become clunky and cluttered. It’s a perfect marriage of two design styles to create something as functional as it is beautiful — and we’re here for it.

Using every possible trend in your home is what could push your design out of the “timeless” category. Instead, choose two or three trends that you’d like your architect to incorporate and then allow him or her to work magic on your design. When done well, your 2019 home can stand the test of time and always look totally on trend.

Design also flows into your outside spaces and in Designing Your Outdoor Living Space This Summer: 4 Hot Trends - From bohemian cues to minimalistic touches, the decor in our homes is migrating outdoors for the summer—and balance, in both colors and materials, is the overarching theme, according to a new report by Zillow. "The lines have been blurred between what's indoor-only and what you can use outside, which means it's never been easier to create an outdoor space that's cohesive with your indoor design," says Kerrie Kelly, design expert at Zillow.

The Hottest Outdoor Trends - Comforts of Indoors, Out. Most of us delineate our indoor living spaces in a structured way, from arranging anchor furniture and hanging lighting to rolling out rugs. According to the Zillow report, this approach is appropriate for outside, as well, in accents like chandeliers and cushions in durable materials, centered around a fireplace or fire pit—ideal for interaction, movement and warmth.

Bright, Saturated Shades - Beyond the comforts of the indoors, citrusy colors are a top trend, with the beginning of the rainbow specifically in vogue. From corals and scarlets to tangerines, these bright hues liven up outdoor spaces, as well as coordinate with less peppy shades, making them simple to swap.

Scandinavian Touches - Classified by minimalism and a monochromatic palette, Nordic/Scandinavian design is also heading outdoors—think aluminum furnishings and neutral textiles. The aesthetic beautifully pairs with wood, according to the design experts at Zillow, complementing a deck or porch well.

Green as a Statement - Eco-friendliness is having its moment, the report shows. To add "green" to your outdoor space, consider installing LED lighting powered by solar, or a dramatic living wall, which won't detract from the natural surroundings.

Looking to get outside this weekend, here are some of the festivals and events happening this weekend — Summer is in full swing, and with the end of the school year come longer days and seemingly endless activities with which to fill them. Get out of the house and have some fun with these festivals and events happening in June throughout the Beehive State.

June 27–29: Taylorsville Dayzz

Taylorsville Dayzz will be held at Valley Regional Park, 5100 S. 2700 West, and will include live entertainment, a parade, a car show, carnival rides, a "Ralph Breaks the Internet" screening, fireworks and more. Most activities are free.

June 29: LOVELOUD

Kesha will headline the third LOVELOUD festival, the brainchild of Imagine Dragons frontman Dan Reynolds. Other performers include Tegan & Sara, Martin Garrix, K. Flay and more. The event will be held at Usana Amphitheater, 5150 Upper Ridge Rd in West Valley City. Tickets for the festival, which begins at 2:30 p.m., start at $29 and can be purchased here. Proceeds benefit local and national LGBTQ+ charities.

Utah Valley

June 22–30: Lehi Round-Up Week

Enjoy events like a picnic in the park, art shows, a barbecue, miniature float parade and more at Lehi’s Round-Up Week, culminating in a weekend rodeo. Locations and pricing vary by event; find more info here.

Northern Utah

June 28–Aug. 10: Deer Valley Music Festival

The Deer Valley Music Festival is the summer home of the Utah Symphony. This year’s festival kicks off with Chris Botti and the Utah Symphony on June 28 at the Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Dr. in Park City. Tickets start at $15.

Southern Utah

June 26–29: Bryce Canyon Annual Astronomy Festival

The 18th annual festival will have telescopes available and feature various astronomy-themed activities and programs. Keynote speaker will be Dr. Amber Straughn, associate director of astrophysics science at NASA.

June 27–Oct. 12: Utah Shakespeare Festival

The Utah Shakespeare Festival returns to Cedar City starting June 27, with "Macbeth" and "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" as its opening-night performances. Ticket prices, venues and plays vary; find a full schedule here.

June 28–30: Panguitch Valley Balloon Rally & 5K

Watch dozens of balloons rise into the sky in the morning, then head to historic Main Street on Saturday evening for the balloon glow. A 5K race will take place on Saturday morning as the balloons take off.

Best State To Live In

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 19, 2019

According to the personal finance website WalletHub via KUTV it turns out that the Beehive State is one of the best states to live in the country, Utah is the ninth-best state to live in the United States. WalletHub stated in its Tuesday report that Utah was ranked ninth overall because of it has the lowest average weekly work hours out of all 50 states, along with ranking in the top 30 among the report's five key dimensions: affordability, economy, education and health, quality of life and safety.

WalletHub also shared in its report that Utah placed in the top 10 because of its rankings in various living conditions categories, including: 24th - Housing costs, 9th - Homeownership, 8th - Percent of the population in poverty and 6th - Income growth; percent of adults in fair or poor health.

Here are the top 10 best states to live in order: Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Colorado, Wisconsin, Virginia, Iowa, Utah and Idaho.

On the other side of the list, these were the 10 worst states to live in the country: Mississippi, Louisiana, New Mexico, Arkansas, Alabama, Alaska, South Carolina, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Kentucky.

As Park City and Salt Lake City continue to grow so do personalities, we found a great article that explains those personalities in - The Best Affordable City to Live for Every Myers-Briggs Personality Type - Your Myers-Briggs personality type can seem surprisingly apt: “Why yes,” you might say while reading your personality description, “I don’t like theories and abstracts, and I do leap before I look! This explains so much.” Sometimes, an internet quiz actually can go a long way in figuring out who you are. Or figuring out where to live.

Salt Lake City, Utah - ESTP. You like to move fast and break things. No shame in that. Your perfect city may be surprising: You’ll be packing up and moving to Salt Lake City, Utah. This western metropolis is one of the country’s best tech cities outside San Francisco. Keeping your attention may be a challenge, but with the state’s wide variety of outdoor activities—and a growing art scene—there’s no shortage of interesting activities.

Not sure what type you are? Take the test.

Moving on to Market Reports - we have our most recent market reports for Upper Deer Valley, Empire Pass, Lower Deer Valley, Deer Crest, Jordanelle, Old Town and the Canyons area. Have a great rest of your week.

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New Listings In Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 12, 2019

This week we are sharing our amazing listings available in Park City as well as our favorite dog trails in town.

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Our next property is 9528 N Red Hawk trail in The Preserve (pictured above). Lot #52 offers a flat building envelope, a mostly level driveway, Southern exposure with direct views of Park City's ski resorts! And only 40 minutes to Salt Lake City International Airport. This lot even has both a pond and a stream running through it. Park City, UT 84098 8.14 acres Offered at $650,000
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8065 Glenwild Drive Offered at $599,000 - 0.89 acres: This lot is located on an EYE-BROW of Glenwild Dr. to provide privacy and safety, with golf, mountain and ski views...next to common land. Glenwild Golf Course has been rated number one by Golf Digest since 2002 for Private Clubs in Utah...you may join the private club as a golfer or as a social member, or not at all. Glenwild is a gated community ideally located 9 Miles for Park City Old Town, and 33 minutes to SLC International Airport...and of course only a few minutes to the Park City's highly ranked ski resorts.
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1306 Preserve Drive 10.04 acres - Offered at $750,000- Just reduced in The Preserve from $785,000, Now $750,000 Located in Phase 3 of the Gated Preservescenic community. The Preserve is located where many dream of living...only 11 minutes to Park City's great ski resorts and Old Town...yet only about 35 minutes to Salt Lake City Int'l Airport...yes you can have it all...privacy, wildlife, views to kill for, acreage, location and that true Mountain Living in a ski resort town. This lot is south facing withaflat building site for ease of construction and lower construction costs. You will enjoy building your dream home on this lot because, of location, trees, great ski mountain views and a short driveway....Yes, you can have it all.
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7328 Pine Ridge Drive - 5 bedrooms, 6.00 bathrooms, 5015 square feet, 0.36 acres, Offered at $1,997,000. The striking stone & wood design is accented by custom wood trusses that only enhance the breathtaking mountain & meadow views. This home features 5 bedrooms, 6 baths, 5,015 sq ft and is currently under construction. This is a wonderful opportunity to own a brand new home in a wonderful neighborhood.Built by Design Construction Inc.,Steve Howe. Estimated completion for this new home to be summer 2019. Great location for both SLC (only 35 minutes to SLC International Airport and 12 minutes to Park City, this Mountain Contemporary home features a great flowing design for entertaining and family. Great room with two family rooms, 5 bdrms,and a flex room (office/6th bdrm/ski prep.rm/craft, or exercise room, etc). Home features Hickory hardwood flooring, granite & quartz, plus a Energy Rated Viking appliance Package. One of the comfort features of this home is the multiple heat zones to control your comfort, along with Passive Solar.
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2351 W Red Pine Court: 5 bedrooms, 7.00 bathrooms, 7500 square feet, 1.07 acres, Offered at $3,995,000. This Elegant Five bedroom/ seven Bath Private Luxury Residence is only 800 feet from the Sunrise/Retreat Ski Run on a private trail right to your property…then down to your home. The location is ideal to be so close to the new Canyons Village that is under development. After skiing back to your residence, relax in your hot tub and then retire to your private theater room. Your friends and family will enjoy sitting by you in the Fireplace Hearth Room as you prepare a delicious meal in your gourmet kitchen…or relax in the large living room, with large windows to allow plenty of light and views into your home. This home sits on one of the most desired lots in this area, due to its privacy with aspens and pine trees, which gives you privacy while being in the middle of it all!. This elegant home boasts radiant heat as well as forced air and central air conditioning. John Shirley is the Architect

Our Favorite Dog Friendly Trails - Out and about with your pup - Park City Magazine. In Park City, off-leash parks dot the landscape from Old Town to the Basin, making it easy to give your pooch a good workout and a little QT with other canines at the same time. While you’re out there, remember to keep your dog on lead as you enter and exit off-leash areas and parking lots, do bring and use poop bags, and practice 10 seconds of kindness while out on the trail: smile, wave, and say hello.

Off-Leash Parks/Areas - Grab your coffee mug and a Chuckit, and head to the grassy two acres adjacent to the Park City Library, appropriately known as Library Field (1255 Park Ave). Join other fur-parents there in the early morning or later in the evening to hang out in the neighbor-provided lawn chairs (the city is considering installing benches), throw balls for fetch-obsessed pups, and kibitz about town happenings. *Unfenced, no shade, high traffic (lots of dogs)

If there were such a thing as summer day camp for dogs, it would look a lot like the Willow Creek Dog Park (4460 Split Rail Ln), a splashing, fetching, and rough-housing doggie dream come true. The on-site pond has both a dock for jumpers and a zero-entry point for those who like to ease in for a dip. This park also features a 0.3-mile soft surface trail, a 24,000-square-foot fetch space, shaded benches, and an agility course. *Fenced, water, high traffic (lots of dogs)

The big dogs are separated from the small, literally, at Trailside Park (5715 Trailside Dr, just south of the bike park), where one side of this fenced area is for large breeds and the other for the little ones. Benches with shade shelters give owners a little civilized relaxation while their pooches take part in segregated playtime. Walkers can access Trailside’s one-mile off-leash trail from here, too. If you go, be sure to pay attention to the signs identifying areas where dogs must be on leash. *No shade, fenced

The Woods at Parley’s Lane (4275 Sunrise Dr, across Interstate 80 from the Weilenmann School) is a small, grassy half-acre with a few training/exercise features within a fenced area and an open lawn on the other half of the park. Amenities include bathrooms (with a drinking fountain), shaded benches, and a paved parking lot (i.e., no post-romp muddy footprints in your car). *Water, no shade, fence

Off-Leash Trails - The Run-A-Muk Trail (2387 Olympic Pkwy) is a favorite of both residents in the nearby Bear Hollow condos and staff of Kimball Junction–area dog-friendly workplaces. This rolling, two-mile path meanders through 43 acres of sage-covered hills and an aspen grove below the Utah Olympic Park. The entire area is fenced, so it’s OK to let your pup really stretch her legs and run wild. Note: The parking lot is not paved, so bring a towel during mud season to wipe your dog’s feet before she hops back in your car. *No shade, high traffic (lots of dogs), fenced, beware of wildlife

They don’t call Round Valley Park City’s playground for nothing. You’ll see plenty of other fit pets and their owners hiking or mountain biking here in the summer; Nordic skiing and snowbiking take center stage here in the winter. This sprawling 1,400-acre wonderland boasts 30 miles of trails, best accessed from the Quinn’s Junction trailhead (84098 Gilmor Way), where there’s water and year-round bathrooms. Not all of Round Valley is designated off-leash, however, so please respect the well-marked areas/trails where dogs must be tethered. *Water, no shade, high traffic (lots of dogs), unfenced, beware of wildlife

The usage guidelines were still in the works as of press time, but there’s still hope that at least parts of the high-altitude open space known as Bonanza Flat (accessed, for now, at the top of Guardsman Pass) will remain off-leash-friendly. Bloods Lake has historically been a popular destination for hiking and cooling off with a dog; if you go, be prepared with a leash in case the rules have changed. And don’t forget the poop bags: Bloods Lake is the water supply for the nearby Girl Scout camp. *Water, unfenced, beware of wildlife

Ramon Gomez, Jr. - Phone: (435) 640-0590 - ramon@rgomezjr.com

Summer Colors

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 05, 2019

Park City is in full bloom and we thought it would be a great idea to open this week's post with paint colors to brighten your home and mood. We will also share some of the international bites in town as well as where to get great cups of local coffee. If picking out a paint color was easy, we’d all do it a lot faster in The 10 Living Room Paint Colors Design Pros Swear By. Paint may not cost a ton, especially if you’re DIYing the job. But who wants to waste time putting the wrong color up on their walls? Here, 11 designer-approved living room paint shades—straight from the designers themselves.

Benjamin Moore King Arthur’s Court (1081) - “Benjamin Moore’s King Arthur’s Court in a matte finish is such an elegant and earthy backdrop, perfect for creating a mood of calm and airy lightness in a living room,” says designer Caitlin Murray, founder of Black Lacquer Design.

Behr Campfire Ash (N320-1) - “One of the best colors for a living room is Campfire Ash from Behr,” says designer Linda Hayslett of LH. Designs. “It’s a great easy, soft color that can blend with any style and space. It’s casual and comfy all at the same time since it’s a greige color.”

Sherwin-Williams Pure White (SW7005) - “Sherwin-Williams’ Pure White is my go-to paint color for living room spaces,” says designer Abbe Fenimore, founder of Studio Ten 25. “I love the fresh feel of white walls and how it creates the perfect backdrop for any color palette. Many people are not a fan of white walls because they show every scuff, but keeping a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser around easily solves that problem.”

Benjamin Moore Graphite (1603) - “When we want to go bold, our go-to living room paint color is Benjamin Moore’s Graphite,” says Jess Blumberg of Dale Blumberg Interiors. “It’s the perfect warm charcoal, so it works with just about any other neutral or color scheme.”

Benjamin Moore Grey Owl (2137-60) - “Lately, I’m focusing even less on color and more on the texture like Venetian Plaster,” says designer Ana Claudia Schultz of Ana Claudia Design. “First, you select your base, Grey Owl from Benjamin Moore is my go-to, then add white plaster to it (the process is more complicated than it sounds so I suggest you hire a professional). Once completed, your space will still be light and bright but full of depth and texture.”

Benjamin Moore Misty Gray (2124-60) and Slate Teal (2058-20) - “One of my favorite whites is called Misty Gray by Benjamin Moore,” says designer Jennifer Wallenstein of September Workshop. “It’s bright and crisp without feeling stark and works beautifully with warm and cool tones. But I am also a fan of a bold wall, and Slate Teal by Benjamin Moore is an amazing shade of blue that comes alive in sunlight and feels perfectly moody at night.”

Behr Bit of Sugar (PR-W14) - “Behr’s Bit of Sugar, a fan favorite, is a trustworthy white with minimal undertones,” says Atlanta-based interior designer and blogger Kevin O’ Gara. “I specified a high gloss finish for extra shine, adding a bit more luminosity to the living room and maximizing the natural light we get in the space.”

Benjamin Moore Chelsea Gray (HC-168) - “We love to use a deep tone like Benjamin Moore’s Chelsea Gray in a living room with so much natural light,” says designers Cynthia Stafford and Lindi Bolinger of TruDesign Colorado. “Using a deeper color in an area more prone to the use of artificial light has a tendency to make the space feel smaller.” But when natural light is present, the opposite is true. “It can really open up your living room and allows you to play with more color when it comes to furniture, draperies and accessories,” says Stafford and Bolinger.

Benjamin Moore Simply White (0C-117) - “Simply White is a softer warmer white that allows for a perfect canvas as we design a living room,” say the designers at Hudson + Bloum. “We have used in our coastal projects and also our mountain project—it’s always clean and fresh.”

Behr Seagull Gray N360-1 - “Behr’s Seagull Gray is the perfect gray that is not too cool and not too warm,” says designer Gail Wright of Gail Wright At Home. “It is just a subtle touch of color for your walls that goes well with any other color you want to incorporate into the room.”

Park City Magazine shares Prowling Park City for Global Goodies - 7 Local dishes that deliver scrumptious international flavor. A ski town with a mining past life might not be the first place you’d expect to find exotic restaurant foods. But in the case of Park City, global cuisines are deliciously well represented, from Asia to the Caribbean and South America to Australia. Let’s take a tour.

Shabu owners Kevin and Robert Valaika refer to what they cook up as “freestyle Asian cuisine.” And a big draw here is Mongolian-style shabu shabu, where you cook your own proteins and veggies right at the table in a cooker filled with a choice of fragrant broths. 442 Main St, 435.645.7253, shabuparkcity.com

It’s a real treat finding the sunny, authentic flavors of Jamaica in a snowy ski town. At 11Hauz in Kimball Junction, you’ll find dishes like jerk chicken and even the traditional Jamaican dish, ackee and saltfish. Ackee is a pear-shaped fruit of the soapberry family that sort of has a scrambled egg consistency. When it’s cooked up with salted cod, onions and peppers, you’ve got some serious island flavors going down, “mon.” 1241 Center Dr, 435.200.8972, 11hauz.com 

If you’ve never had pho—or, even if you’ve had lots of it—you’ll be licking your lips for the pho at PC Pho. A traditional Vietnamese soup, pho is to Vietnam as ramen is to Japan. Pho broth is cooked for many hours, usually made with beef bones, fragrantly spiced with star anise, cloves, cinnamon and other good things, then served with rice noodles and a choice of meats and veggies. I especially enjoy the beef brisket and meatball pho at PC Pho…pho sure. 1890 Bonanza Dr, 435.214.7027

For upscale Japanese cuisine and sushi, it’s hard to beat Yuki Yama Sushi. Alongside both traditional and contemporary rolls, nigiri, sashimi and such, are enticingly unique dishes such as kobujime hirame. Kobujime hirame is simply fresh fluke (hirame) treated to a preparation method called kobujime, where the fluke is cured between sheets of kombu (kelp). It’s served with grilled grapefruit oroshi daikon, ponzu, and crispy sunchokes. 586 Main St, 435.649.6293, yukiyamasushi.com

A favorite staple from south-of-the-border is pozole, a traditional Mexican stew made with (typically) pork, onions, hominy and red chile peppers. At Chubasco Mexican Grill, pozole is served authentically, with an array of accoutrements that includes tortillas, chopped onions, oregano, shredded lettuce or cabbage, radishes, salsa, and more. In Mexico, pozole is served to celebrate New Year’s Eve, but at Chubasco you can enjoy it year-round. 1890 Bonanza Dr, 435.645.9114, elchubascomexicangrill.com

When Bridge Café & Grill owner Emerson Oliveira was growing up in Brazil, he probably never imagined he’d be bringing some of the flavors of his homeland to Utah. But with dishes like moqueca baiana, he’s doing precisely that. The bold flavors of Bahia permeate this seafood stew made with shrimp, fish, mussels and clams, all cooked with tomatoes, onions and garlic, plus two Brazilian secret weapons: coconut milk and dendê (palm) oil. It’s a taste of Brazilian sunshine. 825 Main St, 435.658.5451, thebridgecafeandgrill.com

Down under, in Australia, chook is a word used for chicken or hen. And at Aussie-owned Five5eeds restaurant, the savory waffle and chook is a bright taste of Australia: a waffle with chorizo, spinach, and haloumi cheese, topped with tasty morsels of chook. This is scrumptious chicken and waffles, Southern hemisphere style. 1600 Snow Creek Dr, 435.901.8242, five5eeds.com

Food leads us to coffee in Beyond Starbucks: A Guide to Park City’s Indie Coffee Shops Drink coffee, change your world. While Park City’s coffee culture is not quite as established as it is in places like Portland or San Francisco, here you’ll find plenty of charming local joints where you can sip a cup a really good joe, and even couple of local small-batch craft roasters that will satisfy even the most discerning coffee snobs. So take a chance, forego that first impulse to hit up Starbucks and check out these great independent shops around town, we guarantee you won’t be disappointed! (And yes, WiFi is free and available at all of these locations)

Atticus Coffee & Teahouse - A quintessential independent coffee shop, the centrally located Atticus Coffee & Teahouse (738 Main Street) is all the right kinds of funky. Inside you’ll find a cozy seating and a collection of books and souvenirs made by local artists. Instead of a regular coffee, try one of their unique specialty drinks like the Mexican Mocha (spicy dark chocolate) or the store’s namesake, The Finch (Cubano style latte topped with cinnamon). And if you’re looking for a budget-friendly and healthy bite, Atticus is also a reliable place to grab breakfast bagel or sandwich (vegetarian and vegan-friendly options available).

Lucky Ones Coffee - Tucked inside Park City Library, Lucky Ones Coffee (1255 Park Ave) is undoubtedly one of those businesses that will give you warm fuzzys. The operation was started by Katie Holyfield and Taylor Matkins with a special mission in mind: to employ people with disabilities and change the narrative. Everyone is super friendly and we guarantee you’ll leave there with a smile on your face. The library entrance is also one of the best places in town to hang out or do a little work while enjoying a perfect view of library field where Park City’s many dogs come to play with their owners.

Java Cow - If you’re looking for a coffee shop that pays attention to the details, the Java Cow (402 Main St) is the place. Though this longtime Park City business is well-known for it’s homemade ice cream (it’s not unusual for the line for cones to extend out the front door), here they also serve authentic croissants, made according to French method; homemade biscotti, and a wide assortment of coffee drinks, both hot and cold, made with the Logan, Utah-roasted Caffe Ibis coffee.

Campos Coffee - Looking to make their mark in North America, Australia’s Campos Coffee opened their first outpost, also called Campos Coffee (1385 Lowell Ave, Ste AC-106), at the base of the slopes in Park City Mountain’s Town Base. Steps away from the ski lifts, this shop is an ideal pitstop in the morning before hitting the trail and afternoon breaks for a pick-me-up to keep you shredding into the evening. Don’t stop at just coffee, fuel up with smashed avocado toast or and Australian Jaffle (just beware the Vegemite if you’ve never tried it!)  Note: Campos Coffee closes during the shoulder season when the resort is on break; stay up to date with hours of operation here). 

Stoked Roasters & Coffeehouse  - One of Park City’s newest coffee joints, STOKED Roasters (268 Main Street) claims to be the “official coffee of the outdoors.” We’re inclined to believe it given the shop is the passion project of local athlete and professional ultra-runner Jax Mariash (more about this epic wonder woman here). Inside you’ll find plentiful seating, a quiet and friendly atmosphere ideal for working, and a mean cup of coffee. You can also get a dose of inspiration if you’re lucky enough to come in when Mariash is around (or from the epic adventure art on the wall).

Pink Elephant Coffee Shop - You might have some difficulty finding Pink Elephant (509 Main Street) if you don’t know where to look: get there by walking through the Prospect clothing store and up to the second floor. The building is actually home to four local businesses that are worth patronizing (read about the collective here). Founded by passionate coffee roasters Kelley and Mitch Baker, Pink Elephant is all about craft coffee and a gem for any coffee connoisseurs out there. The shop is a tight space and the seating is limited, but perfect if you’re looking for really good coffee or somewhere quiet and away from the crowds. Don’t look for any sugary/sweet drinks here, it’s all about accentuating the flavors of the beans in this shop!

Silver King Coffee  - Yes, sitting around leisurely drinking coffee can be great, but sometimes you just want to get your cup of joe and go. For those occasions, Silver King Coffee (1409 Kearns Blvd) is a convenient solution. Park City’s one and only drive-thru shop, Silver King Coffee looks like a cute little ski shack, complete with a red roof. It’s large enough for only the employees to enter, meaning you drive or walk up to get your coffee fix. In addition to warm and cold coffee drinks, they also have smoothies, tasty breakfast burritos, assorted pastries, and trail mix if you need a snack on the go.

PC Coffee Roasters - Colorful, upbeat, and friendly, PC Coffee Roasters (1764 Uinta Way, Ste B-1) is a local favorite with plenty of regulars for good reason. Not only is their freshly roasted and delicious coffee made right here in town, the service in this shop is impeccable. In addition to coffee, they serve a whole range of pastries, all day breakfast items, sandwiches, and more. Dietary restrictions? No worries, they have you covered with gluten and dairy free options. Chairs, couches, and outdoor seating make this a prime shop for meet-ups and working.

Hugo Coffee - You can’t get more Park City than branding your business with your pup. That’s what Claudia McMullin did when she made her rescue dog Hugo the face of her coffee business in 2014. The bright, colorful bags of beans emblazoned with a dog face are widely available at grocery stores around town, but you can also get the coffee straight from the source at the Hugo Coffee Shop (1794 Olympic Pkwy), housed inside the Park City Visitor’s Center in Kimball Junction. All the beans are roasted in small batches right in town so you can rest assured you’re getting the freshest product possible. The mountain views through the floor to ceiling windows are killer and do a nice job of bringing the outdoors in.

Entrepreneurial Spirit

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 29, 2019

For those people with an entrepreneurial spirit, Utah's capital city is one of the best places in the country to try your luck at being your own boss, new reports say from KSL. A report by FitSmallBusiness.com ranked Salt Lake City No. 6 among the top 10 cities for entrepreneurs in 2019. The study looked at business survival rate, economic growth rate, new business growth, the local financial landscape, area tax climate, the labor market, quality of life and cost of living, explained special project editor Jeff Steen.

"There are a lot of factors, but at the ground level it's about opportunity," he said. "Part of that is an existing infrastructure that supports startup culture." He said in the top-ranked cities, accessibility to investment capital is better than in many other locales compared to the overall population and startup density in those markets.

"Based on those factors, is it possible for startups to secure the funding they need to get off the ground?" he said. "Additionally, the best cities are places that offer resources to entrepreneurs that help them in their quest to get their companies up and running, including mentorship."

The entrepreneurial spirit is strong even in the donut world as The Park Record has shared where to get the best donut in Utah. Votes are in and we agree: Utah’s best donut is sold out of a Kamas gas station! The team of bakers at Mirror Lake Station used to think they made the best doughnuts in the state. Now, they have a plaque to prove it as they were awarded Utah’s Best Donut Award during the Utah Dough Show, a convention for donut-lovers that took place for the first time this year, in Salt Lake City. The station’s raspberry fritter beat out doughnuts from 22 other bakeries from around the state.

The Mirror Lake Station doughnuts have been a Kamas favorite since the station started serving the sweet pastries 40 years ago. Bakers make all of the doughnuts from scratch in a bakery behind the station. On average, 400 doughnuts a day with most of the doughnut recipes having remained the same over the last 40 years. The bakery also makes cookies, bagels, turnovers and croissants. Clara Sargent, the bakery manager, has led the bakery for 15 years. She said she wants to switch things up a little, but she intends to keep the crowd favorites on the shelves for the next 40 years.

We will wrap up this week's blog with the most recent market reports.

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Beautify Your Backyard

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 22, 2019

Snow may have found its way to Park City over the weekend, but summer is around the corner. This week we have 8 Ways to Beautify Your Backyard, how to make a good impression with your home and visiting the dinosaurs of Utah.

Whether you're considering selling your house or you want to improve the appearance of your current property, there are many ways to beautify your backyard. A well-maintained backyard can make you enjoy coming home to relax and make you proud when you have friends and family over.

Here are nine tips to help you improve and beautify your backyard:

Add a Custom Shed - If you have random lawn equipment out on your yard, it can be unflattering. When you build a shed, you have a place to store your gardening and lawn equipment.

Create a Walkway - Most people put stone walkways in the front yard but neglect to add them to their backyard landscaping. Use stone or pavers to create a walkway that'll be inviting and give a clear path to your patio or pool. This will limit the amount of traffic going through your lawn, which could damage your grass. It will also make your yard more eye-appealing.

Pergolas, Decks and Patios - Creating a definitive entertainment location can be a beautiful addition to your backyard. By adding a pergola, deck, or patio, you're making a place that immediately attracts your guests. You can add flowers and potted plants. A grill and outdoor lighting around your pergola or patio will make for the perfect finishing touches.

Outdoor Kitchen - An outdoor kitchen is great for locations that don't get a lot of rain and for people who like to entertain often—include a built-in grill, mini fridge, sink, etc. Anything that you would need to access inside your house, include it in your outdoor kitchen. This will eliminate much of the foot traffic through your house and give you a beautiful backyard.

Paint Your Fence - If you have a fence in your yard that you don't necessarily like the looks of, you can paint it to make your backyard look better. Depending what look you want, you can either go with one standard color, or paint a mural on the fence to make it a talking point, rather than an eye sore.

Add Outdoor Seating - If you want your guests to feel comfortable and at home, add cozy outdoor seating to your backyard. Use wooden pallets, long benches and Adirondack chairs to give people an option of where they want to sit. Also, add a wrap around tree bench or a daybed and get creative with fabrics and color schemes.

Give the Kids a Place to Play - A tree house or playset can really add a cool note to your backyard. Get creative with walkways and ladders, add lighting and tree swings. The options are unlimited.

Add Eye-Popping Landscaping - Beautiful landscaping can be a wonderful addition to your backyard. Add hydrangeas, butterfly gardens and flower borders. You can change the entire look of your yard just by adding some pretty plants.

There are so many ways that you can beautify your backyard. With these tips you can have a stunning place for guests to visit and a relaxing spot to unwind at night.

Homes That Make a Good First Impression Have 5 Things in Common - My Domaine - It takes just 26 seconds for a guest to form an opinion of your home when they walk through the front door. What does your space say about you? While we try to resist the urge to judge, there's no doubt that first impressions count. Whether you're expecting guests or you're hoping to transform your spare room into a rental, experts agree there are five key areas that friends notice first about your house. Make these simple changes for a home that makes a lasting impression.

"A clean and welcoming entryway is crucial in leaving a good first impression—it's the first thing a guest sees!" says Cresswell. When transforming a home into a OneFineStay property, she says it's crucial that the entrance introduces a design theme. "A good first impression—that moment when a guest's breath is taken away—comes from stepping into a home with striking, deliberate design," she says. "Think bright, organized, and neutral. There's a place for the eclectic or quirky, but the entryway is not that place."

Instant fix: If you don't have time to restyle your entryway, Cresswell says updating wall décor is a simple way to unify the space. "Rather than cobbling a bunch of different frames or odds and ends together, choose a few specific things that pair perfectly. A precisely placed mirror can make a space look much bigger and brighter."

If you only pay attention to the look of your home, you're missing one of the most important factors that influence guests: fragrance. A Trulia study suggests it could also increase the value of your home; 30% of real estate agents said scent was the single most important sense during an open house and named vanilla and fresh scents as the most popular among house hunters.

Instant fix: Light a vanilla or citrus candle in the living room or near the entrance to infuse your home with an uplifting scent. If you're turning your home into a rental, be sure to use a tall lantern to shield the open flame. "Flowers always add an elegant but subtle fragrance, and baking cookies is another great way to get a welcoming air on arrival," says Cresswell.

It's time to address that discarded pile of magazines or strewn shoes—when it comes to first impressions, clutter counts. 73% of real estate agents said cleanliness is the most important sight-based feature during a viewing, possibly because unnecessary furniture and décor can make a space feel small.

"A foyer should have absolutely no clutter," says Cresswell. "Everything, from decorative knickknacks to practical things like shoes, should have a designated place. Keys should be hung neatly on a key rack, and shoes should have a rack or boot tray. As for cleanliness, dusting and vacuuming go a long way."

Instant fix: Use decorative baskets to mask mess. Position them by the doorway, under a coffee table, or beside a sofa to fake a cleaner-looking home without removing any items.

The color you choose to paint your home can have a big impact on its value. A report by Zillow Digs found that slate gray was among the most disliked colors among guests and cut the value of a home by over $1000. If you're painting a guest room, real estate agents told Trulia that white, ivory, and eggshell are the most appealing shades to create an inviting space.

Instant fix: If repainting your home isn't an option, pay attention to lighting. A carefully chosen floor lamp with the right colored bulb can subtly change the intensity of paint and is a perfect way to make a slate-gray room feel bright and fresh.

To turn a good first impression into a lasting one, Kaye says personal touches matter most. "A well-made bed is the most important thing you can offer your guests. It is the key to making your visitors feel completely comfortable, cozy, and relaxed!" When creating the brand's first-ever hotel, Kaye channeled five-star vibes with a few expert touches. "You should always provide at least two pillows of varying firmness per guest and dedicate a few sets of towels and sheets for guest use only. This will allow them to last longer than if you added them to your daily rotation of linens."

Instant fix: Caught off-guard by unexpected guests? Try this hotel-approved towel folding method for a thoughtful guestroom touch. "First, lay the towel flat on a surface, and smooth out any wrinkles. Then, starting with the long side of the towel, fold the length in thirds," says Kaye. "Grasp the short side, and fold the towel in half. Repeat this step," and you should be left with a neat square.

Looking for something to do this weekend, visit the Dinosaurs in Utah by Only in Your State - If you want to learn more about some of Utah’s first residents, there are several places to check out. There’s the Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point, the Natural History Museum in Salt Lake City, the Dinosaur Museum in Blanding and of course we have an entire Dinosaur National Monument in Vernal. There’s another dinosaur park in Utah that many people don’t even know about: the George S. Eccles Dinosaur Park in Ogden. Check it out!

Did dinosaurs live in Utah? They certainly did! Dinosaurs once roamed all over the Beehive State during the Mesozoic Era, 225 to 65 million years ago. Most of the dinosaur bones found it Utah are from dinosaurs who lived here during the Late Jurassic Era through the Late Cretaceous Era. Just imagine what it must have been like when these giant beasts walked around here.

Are there dinosaur fossils in Utah? Absolutely. Because of Utah’s dry climate and high altitude during the time of the dinosaurs, their bones were perfectly preserved. Utah is a world-renowned site for paleontologists who come here to study dinosaur fossils. Bones of many species have been found here, including Allosaurus, Seitaad, and several species of Sauropods, Ornithopods, and Ankylosaurs. Utah even has two dinosaurs named after it: the Utahceratops and the Utahraptor.

What museum has the best dinosaur exhibit in Utah? It’s hard to pick just one favorite dinosaur museum in Utah. Visit the Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point, the Dinosaur Museum in Blanding, and the Dinosaur Quarry Exhibit Hall at Dinosaur National Monument in Vernal.

What are the best dinosaur attractions in Utah? Dinosaur lovers living in Utah are lucky indeed, because we have tons of great dinosaur attractions here. In addition to the Eccles Dinosaur Park and the museums we’ve mentioned above, you’ll want to visit the Natural History Museum of Utah in Salt Lake City, the BYU Museum of Paleontology in Provo, the Utah Field House of Natural History in Vernal, the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry near Price, and the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site in St. George. You’ll also want to take a hike on the Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trail near Moab.

The George S. Eccles Dinosaur Park is open during the spring Monday – Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (the museum closes at 5:00 p.m.). During summer months, hours are extended until 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Admission is $7 for adults; $6 for seniors and students; $5 for children ages 2-12; free for children under two years old.

Dinosaurs in Utah by Only in Your State - If you want to learn more about some of Utah’s first residents, there are several places to check out. There’s the Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point, the Natural History Museum in Salt Lake City, the Dinosaur Museum in Blanding and of course we have an entire Dinosaur National Monument in Vernal. There’s another dinosaur park in Utah that many people don’t even know about: the George S. Eccles Dinosaur Park in Ogden. Check it out!

Did dinosaurs live in Utah? They certainly did! Dinosaurs once roamed all over the Beehive State during the Mesozoic Era, 225 to 65 million years ago. Most of the dinosaur bones found it Utah are from dinosaurs who lived here during the Late Jurassic Era through the Late Cretaceous Era. Just imagine what it must have been like when these giant beasts walked around here.

Are there dinosaur fossils in Utah? Absolutely. Because of Utah’s dry climate and high altitude during the time of the dinosaurs, their bones were perfectly preserved. Utah is a world-renowned site for paleontologists who come here to study dinosaur fossils. Bones of many species have been found here, including Allosaurus, Seitaad, and several species of Sauropods, Ornithopods, and Ankylosaurs. Utah even has two dinosaurs named after it: the Utahceratops and the Utahraptor.

What museum has the best dinosaur exhibit in Utah? It’s hard to pick just one favorite dinosaur museum in Utah. Visit the Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point, the Dinosaur Museum in Blanding, and the Dinosaur Quarry Exhibit Hall at Dinosaur National Monument in Vernal.

What are the best dinosaur attractions in Utah? Dinosaur lovers living in Utah are lucky indeed, because we have tons of great dinosaur attractions here. In addition to the Eccles Dinosaur Park and the museums we’ve mentioned above, you’ll want to visit the Natural History Museum of Utah in Salt Lake City, the BYU Museum of Paleontology in Provo, the Utah Field House of Natural History in Vernal, the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry near Price, and the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site in St. George. You’ll also want to take a hike on the Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trail near Moab.

The George S. Eccles Dinosaur Park is open during the spring Monday – Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (the museum closes at 5:00 p.m.). During summer months, hours are extended until 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Admission is $7 for adults; $6 for seniors and students; $5 for children ages 2-12; free for children under two years old.

Spring Investments

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 15, 2019

Spring is here and summer is on the way and it’s time to get back in the saddle again. Park City Magazine shares Back in the Saddle Again - Take to the trails with early-season mountain biking tips from a pro. Former mountain bike pro, PMBIA certified instructor, and owner of MTB-focused business Women in the Mountains, Erica Tingey shares tips on how to seamlessly get back into fitness after a long winter.

Start slow. Give yourself some space and expect that you’re going to be slow on your first ride out—and that’s OK, Tingey says. “Find a trail that’s not challenging for your first ride back,” she recommends. “I start in Round Valley because there are not any long, sustained climbs.” She also recommends riding the RTS Loop Trail near the Utah Olympic Park, so you can do a few laps. “Find a loop and ride it a few times to feel yourself improving, and to feel your blood vessels and muscles opening up.”

Re-train your vision. Without even realizing it, when you’re in mountain bike shape, your eyes naturally look far ahead to anticipate the terrain and any obstacles. Over the winter, it’s easy to lose that skill, Tingey says. “When you’re getting back into riding, try to look ahead a little bit more than you naturally would. It takes self-control to do this, and to anticipate what’s coming up. The tendency is to look down—force your eyes up.”

Loosen up.“No matter what you’ve been doing over the winter, riding always feels different,” Tingey says. “Your hands might get that itchy feeling from bouncing. And when you’re nervous or tired, you tend to grip too tight, and it’s really hard on your upper body. See if you can loosen up on the climbs and the descents.”

Start with an athletic stance. When you get tired—which can happen quickly during the early season—your posture is one of the first things to decline. Start the year with good habits and think about holding an athletic stance with your core tight, your spine strong, and your neck up. “It might be hard to hold a good posture for all three laps,” Tingey says, “but it’s a good clue to know that when you can’t hold a very good posture, you should call it a day. If you’re not riding in a strong position, you’re setting yourself up for more accidents.”

Turn your fear into excitement. If you’re a bit more skittish on technical sections than you were last year, try to put your nerves to good use. “When I was racing, instead of saying ‘I’m not nervous,’ I’d say, ‘I’m excited to be on my bike,’” Tingey says. “Turn it into positive self-talk. As in ‘I’m OK to get off my bike and walk it.’” She also notes that there’s a difference between trying and doing. “Think Yoda: There is no try.”

Just get on a saddle. If the trails are still too muddy, grab your road bike and to get used to being back in the saddle. “Using your road bike is a way to get some miles in and get used to being back in that position,” Tingey says.

Don’t forget a maintenance check. Whether it’s you or your trusty mechanic, do a thorough check of your bike before hopping on. Check the bolts with torque wrench, clean and lube the drivetrain, and test the front suspension (Tingey says to put a hand on each brake, engage, and stand behind the bike and shock it down—does it feel like it’s going up and down at the same rate as last year?). And, of course, put air in your tires, but maybe a little less than you think. “This year, try three psi less than you ever have and just see if you can get away with it,” advises Tingey.

A reminder: Wait until the trails are dry. “Riding muddy trails ruins it for everyone else for the rest of the season,” Tingey says. “It leaves ruts that aren’t magically fixed from a summer of riding. They are stuck for the rest of the year. You’re really ruining it for yourself and it’s also really hard on your bike.”

Where to find trail updates: Check the Mountain Trails Foundation’s website and Facebook page for the latest trail conditions; Basin Recreation also frequently updates the status on its Instagram and Facebook pages.

Forbes has shared The Best Cities In Utah To Own Investment Property - Based on the Census Bureau’s annual estimates of resident population, from July 2010 to July 2018, Utah’s state population increased by 13.9%, second only to the District of Columbia, and No. 1 out of all 50 states in terms of growth. Utah is an interesting state when it comes to buying and owning investment property. People and businesses have been flocking to the state, and many of its major cities have seen swelling numbers of renters. Major universities, healthcare companies and financial firms like Ally Bank can be found in Utah’s main cities, all of which help boost the economy, and increase the number of residents and appeal of the city to potential investment property owners.

1. Logan, Utah - With 61% of its occupied housing filled by renters, Logan is a fast-growing city whose population is expected to double by 2050. A key feature that makes Logan conducive to investment property owners is the presence of Utah State University, with a student population of nearly 28,000, many of which are renters or looking to rent in off-campus residences. In addition to them, professors, university staff and employees, as well as employees of businesses closely associated with the university, add to a large supply of renters and potential renters in the city. Logan also has the highest gross rental yield of major cities in Utah, i.e. cities with more than 10,000 total occupied housing units.

  • Percentage of renter households: 61%
  • Number of renter households: 10,039
  • Median property price: $235,000
  • Median rent: $1,588
  • Annual rental income: $19,056
  • Gross rental yield: 8.1%
2. Ogden, Utah - Located north of Salt Lake City, about a 30-to-40-minute drive up Interstate 15, Ogden is another great place for potential investment property owners. Property prices are affordable in terms of buy-in, and rents are comparatively high enough to produce a gross rental yield of 6.3%, behind only Logan’s 8.1%.Like Logan, Ogden is a college town, home to Weber State University, which has an undergraduate population of 27,111, according to U.S. News and World Report. The university’s students and staff provide a large pool of potential renters of your investment property in Ogden. In fact, according to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, Weber State University is the No. 4 largest employer in Ogden, behind the Department of Treasury, Weber County School District, McKay-Dee Hospital Center, and ahead of Autoliv, the world’s largest automotive safety supplier, according to their website.
  • Percentage of renter households: 44.6%
  • Number of renter households: 13,442
  • Median property price: $229,900
  • Median rent: $1,207
  • Annual rental income: $14,484
  • Gross rental yield: 6.3%
3. Midvale, Utah - A majority of occupied homes in Midvale are renters, which bodes well for rental property owners. According to Census data from the 2017 American Community Survey, the number of renter-occupied housing units has risen by over 29% from 2010 to 2017. Compare that to the U.S. overall, which has seen an increase of 12.7% over the same period of time. Several major companies have operations in Midvale, with some of the largest employers including Overstock.com, the staffing agency TEKsystems and the financial company SoFi, according to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for 2018.
  • Percentage of renter households: 58.5%
  • Number of renter households: 7,293
  • Median property price: $308,900
  • Median rent: $1,503
  • Annual rental income: $18,036
  • Gross rental yield: 5.8%
4. South Salt Lake - South of Interstate 80, and bisected by the north-south Interstate 15, South Salt Lake is cheaper than Salt Lake City proper, and has a better gross rental yield than the latter city. This is because the median property price is less than $300,000 — whereas in Salt Lake City, it’s $425,000 — while the median rent is still high enough to yield solid rental income over the course of the year. According to South Salt Lake’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for 2018, the biggest private employer is Marriott Vacations Worldwide, a leading timeshare company and publicly traded, which was originally a division of Marriott International before being spun off into its own firm.
  • Percentage of renter households: 58.6%
  • Number of renter households: 5,185
  • Median property price: $291,900
  • Median rent: $1,394
  • Annual rental income: $16,728
  • Gross rental yield: 5.7%
5. Orem, Utah - Orem is an interesting case for potential investment property owners looking to get into the Utah market. According to Census data, from 2017 to 2017, the number of renters increased by 16.4%, while at the same time, the number of owner-occupied homes actually declined: From 17,013 in 2010 to 16,200 in 2017. Like other Utah cities on this list, Orem benefits from being home to Utah Valley University. This public university has an undergraduate population of close to 37,000, according to U.S. News. Besides this vast pool of potential student renters, Utah Valley University is the largest employer in Orem, according to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.
  • Percentage of renter households: 41.1%
  • Number of renter households: 11,318
  • Median property price: $315,038
  • Median rent: $1,449
  • Annual rental income: $17,388
  • Gross rental yield: 5.5%
6. Provo, Utah - Along with Orem, Provo comprises the Provo-Orem metropolitan area, which has a combined population of 617,678, according to Data USA. The Provo metro area boasts an impressively low unemployment rate of 2.8% in Feb. 2019, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In fact, from Feb. 2014 to Feb. 2019, unemployment in the Provo metro are has averaged 3.1%. Over that same period, the national unemployment rate averaged 4.8%. For investment property buyers, Provo benefits from a high percentage of renters, due no doubt in part because it’s home to Brigham Young University, one of the largest private universities in the country.
  • Percentage of renter households: 59.2%
  • Number of renter households: 19,475
  • Median property price: $309,000
  • Median rent: $1,334
  • Annual rental income: $16,008
  • Gross rental yield: 5.1%
7. Salt Lake City, Utah - The population of Utah’s capital has grown from 184,488 in 2010, to 194,188 by 2017. That’s a little over a 5% increase, and similar to the increase in renter-occupied housing units over the same period: 5%, from 37,735 to 39,626. This trend, along with the majority of the city’s residents being renters, bodes well for potential investment property owners in Utah.
  • Percentage of renter households: 51.5%
  • Number of renter households: 39,626
  • Median property price: $425,000
  • Median rent: $1,598
  • Annual rental income: $19,176
After scrambling for venues last year, the Park City Institute announced its St. Regis Big Stars, Bright Nights Summer Concert Series will continue this year in The Eccles Center for the Performing Arts. Park City Institute Executive Director Teri Orr announced the new location during an unveiling of the series at the Kimball Art Center.According to an Institute press release, the series is as follows: 

 — The Brothers Osborne, July 7. The Grammy Award-nominated duo features T.J. and John Osborne, who have climbed the country charts with the hits “Stay a Little Longer” and “Rum,” while collecting CMA and ACM awards along the way.

 — The Punch Brothers, July 30. The quintet of mandolinist Chris Thile, guitarist Chris Eldridge, bassist Paul Kowert, banjoist Noam Pikelny and violinist Gabe Witcher formed in 2006. The band’s latest album, “All Ashore,” won the 2019 Grammy for Folk Album of the year. Thile is known for his work in Nickel Creek, and is also the host of the weekly NPR broadcast “Live From Here.”

 — Taj Mahal Quartet, and Marc Cohn featuring special guest vocalists, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Aug. 13. Taj Mahal is a two-time Grammy-winning singer, songwriter, film composer, guitarist and multi-instrumentalist who has collaborated with artists such as Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan and Wynton Marsalis.

Cohn, mostly known for the hit “Walking in Memphis,” has performed for Park City Institute three times and as a songwriter has been praised by Time Magazine as “one of the honest, emotional voices we need in this decade.”

The multiple Grammy-winning Blind Boys of Alabama formed in 1939 at the Alabama Institute for the Negro Blind and have since performed for three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

 — Gone West, Aug. 16. This pop-infused country group features Colbie Caillat, her fiance Justin Young, Caillat’s longtime collaborator Jason Reeves, and Reeves’ wife, Nelly Joy. The band formed, in part, as a result of their experience working together on Caillat’s 2016 tour. The Park City Institute presented Caillat at the Eccles Center in a sold-out performance during that tour.

 — CAM, Aug. 24. Country singer CAM began her career as a songwriter for artists including Sam Smith and Miley Cyrus. Her 2015 Grammy-nominated song “Burning House” hit No. 2 on the U.S. and Canadian country charts, and sold more than 2 million copies. A vocal advocate for music education and inclusion, CAM holds a degree in psychology from University of California Davis, sits on the board of the Academy of Country Music and joined the Recording Academy’s Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion in 2018.

Galleries, Trains and Music

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 07, 2019

As the weather warms up there are plenty of things to do in the Park City area. This week we are highlighting a few art galleries, the 150th Anniversary of the Golden Spike and the 2019 Twilight Concert Series lineup.

It is a rare—and beautiful—thing for so many galleries to set up shop within a half mile of one another, as is the case on Park City’s Main Street. Here Park City Magazine presents an overview of this historic thoroughfare’s art purveyors, highlighting a few of our faves. For a more festive tour, come out during the Park City Gallery Association’s Gallery Stroll, held on the last Friday of every month, 6 to 9 p.m.

Housed in what was once a 19th-century bank, the brightly lit Meyer Gallery (305 Main St, 435.649.8160) features homegrown Utah artists including Brian Kershisnik and Jeffery Pugh. Owner Susan Meyer, whose parents opened the gallery in 1965, says that giving clientele a taste of Mountain West art makes the gallery relevant. And running an art business with integrity is what has made her business thrive over the years.

Maren Mullin, owner of Gallery MAR (436 Main St, 435.649.3001), was just 25 when she launched her namesake gallery. A decade later, some of her early discoveries have evolved from emerging to established—including encaustic artist and Park City resident Bridgette Meinhold and Salt Lake City–based painter Aaron Memmott. No longer the youngest entrepreneur on the block, Mullin says she’s still “constantly learning” in a business that’s rarely black and white.

“One opportunity led to another opportunity that led to another opportunity,” says Colby Larsen, who owns four galleries on Main Street, each occupying its own niche and catering to a specific kind of patron. It started with the contemporary Old Towne Gallery (580 Main St, 435.655.3910), where a Miro and a Warhol hang. Park City Fine Art (558 Main St, 435.649.3583) is a traditional-meets-contemporary Western art gallery. Pando (444 Main St, 435.602.1096) branches into the nature-inspired realm with everything from 50-million-year-old fossils to landscape paintings. Finally, Prospect Gallery (573 Main St, 435.714.0508) fills the timber-hewn Claim Jumper space with blue chip–level pieces from artists like Ashley Collins and Chagall.

The colorful, contemporary art inside the cheery Terzian Galleries (625 Main St, 435.649.4927) reflects owner Karen Terzian’s self-described eclectic taste—from Melissa Chandon’s vivid, 1950s-inspired landscapes to Sara Shepherd Edgar’s humorous, monochromatic depictions of everyday people. But her choices go beyond simply liking an artist’s work at first blush. She researches with an eye for passion, work ethic, and focus.

May 10, 1869 was a turning point in American history. After seven years of arduous work, tens of thousands of man-hours, incredible risk, and hundreds of deaths, the Union Pacific and Central Pacific Railroads finally connected at Promontory Summit, Utah, linking the country from coast to coast for the very first time. On that day, a crowd of workers and dignitaries gathered around the Jupiter and No. 119 steam engines to watch the final golden spike be driven (actually, ceremonially tapped and then later replaced) into the tracks. Celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Golden Spike by Park City Magazine - Utah commemorates the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad with family-friendly events and exhibits.

Every year, people gather for reenactments of the momentous occasion, but for the 150th anniversary of the Golden Spike, Utah is planning a party of special magnificence. The main commemoratory festival (May 10-12) will, of course, take place at the Golden Spike National Historic Site (6200 North 22300th Street West, Corinne) at Promontory Summit.

Festivities kick-off with the arrival of the Jupiter and #119 replica steam engines arrive at 8:15 a.m. (site opens to the public at 8 a.m.) on May 10. The official opening ceremony (11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.) features a keynote address from renowned presidential scholar and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham, who will offer his perspective on the historical significance of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. His remarks will be followed by the world premiere of As One, a new musical inspired by the Golden Spike era. Written and directed by award-winning composer, producer, and songwriter Stephen Nelson; lyricist and vocalist Anjanette Mickelsen; and choreographed by Jennifer Park Hohl, As One features five original compositions and a chorus and band comprised of 250 elementary school students from Utah’s 29 counties.

After the opening ceremony, visitors can enjoy a variety of activities, including historical re-enactments, performances from local artists and musicians, interactive exhibits, demonstrations, food trucks, merchants, and more. Highlights include the Frontier Camp where exhibits and storytellers bring the lives of long-gone railroad workforce to life and the STEM Innovation Summit where young innovators can imagine where we’ll soar to by 2069 using today’s aviation, rocketry, and drone technology.

Whistle Stop in Echo, May 8 -Big Boy No. 4014, one of Union Pacific’s historic steam locomotives, rolls into Echo (3525 S. Echo Rd,) as part of Spike 150 revelry. Summit County’s festivities begin at 8 a.m. with live music and food trucks and chug along with the train’s arrival (9:20 a.m.), and it’s departure for Morgan at 9:40 a.m. If you’re feeling particularly sprightly, this presents the perfect opportunity for a morning bike ride or walk on the Historic Rail Trail, which ends/starts in Echo.

From now through June 2, visit the Kimball Art Center to see the work of internationally acclaimed artist Zhi Lin. Lin’s art explores the lost history of the Chinese workers who labored for years on the railroads, often doing the most dangerous work. In conjunction with the exhibit, the Kimball will also host several related events including a free panel discussion Art, Activism, and Immigration (May 11). Visit the Kimball Art Center website for more details.

Don’t want to drive out all the way to Promontory Summit? Head over to Heber on May 10 (5:30 - 9:30 p.m.) for a Golden Spike celebration at the Heber Valley Railroad, featuring live music, trivia, and fireworks. You’ll have the opportunity to dress in period clothes, pose in front of the steam locomotive for fun photos, dance around a bonfire, and more.

The Salt Lake City Arts Council has announced the lineup for the 2019 Twilight Concert Series. (ABC4 News) The concert series is one of the longest-running community events in Salt Lake City. The Thursday night summer concert series has presented artists across the spectrum of musical genres including indie-rock, hip-hop, reggae, and blues.

JULY 20 - HIPPIE SABOTAGE*

JULY 25 - BLIND PILOT, Foxwarren & The Hollering Pines

AUG. 1 - YOUNG THE GIANT, The Aces & Sego

AUG. 8 - VINCE STAPLES, Leikeli47 & Concise Kilgore

AUG. 15 - COURTNEY BARNETT*

AUG. 30 - SANTIGOLD*

*Indicates special guests are TBA

Season tickets for the concert series are on sale now. General tickets go on sale Thursday, May 9 at 10 a.m. You can buy tickets at 24tix.com/twilight.

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Spring Is Here

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 01, 2019

The snow may be back this morning in Park City, but here are some Tips for Reviving Your Lawn After Winter. Early spring is one of the best times of the year to make your home look great. This busy season coincides with an uptick in activity in the real estate market, making it that much more critical for you to get your lawn back in great shape.

Feed It Well - Spring is the most critical time to give your lawn a boost. Winter drags on in many areas of the country, which can deplete a yard come spring. If you find yourself in this situation, try applying a quick-release fertilizer to prepare your lawn for spring. This fertilizer will get to the roots and green up your yard in a few days. However, be cautious when applying a quick-release fertilizer, as putting too much in one spot can kill your grass.Other fertilizer options include slow-release fertilizers that'll feed your lawn over time. This kind of fertilizer usually comes in granules or pellets that sit on top of your soil. They dissolve over time and provide the best long-lasting energy option for lawns.

Water in the Morning - Fertilizer applications need moisture to work best. Watering your lawn in the spring may seem counterintuitive given the rainfall that some climates receive, but watering your lawn regularly is essential to help the grass grow strong. Consider watering your yard in the morning before 10 a.m., as this will allow the lawn time to soak up the water and dry out under the afternoon sun. Watering in the evening or at night may seem smart, but it can actually cause lawn care problems such as disease and fungi.

Ease Into Mowing - While your lawn may have grown a little throughout the winter depending on your location, lawns need some time to ease into the spring. Refrain from mowing your lawn on a low setting as temperatures go up. Short lawns expose the root system, which can create a stressful situation for the grass. Consider doing a light mow early on in the season to take off the tips of the blades. Doing so will ease your lawn back into the growing season and will help keep it looking great.

Start Fighting Weeds - Homeowners looking to put their home on the market should combat any weeds in their lawn. There are many weed and feed chemicals to help prevent weeds. These mixes often include different fertilizers, so be sure to read the directions so that you don't give your lawn too much. Locate any problem areas in your yard and consider applying weed control to those areas, as well.

Seed Thin Spots - It's common for bare spots to appear after a long winter. Immediately care for areas of the lawn that have thinned or are completely bare. These spots can cause problems, not only with weed growth, but also in presenting a beautiful lawn to a prospective buyer. Rake out these spots in your yard and apply a good amount of seed. Give these spots extra water a few weeks after you seed them to encourage new grass roots to take hold.

There are many ways to help your lawn come back after a long winter. Mow the grass on a high setting until it has had time to recover, fertilize and water the lawn to boost growth, and be sure to keep weeds away by using preventive measures. Follow all the tips listed above and your lawn will be back to its former glory in no time.

When you are not working on your yard, here are some Fun early spring activity recommendations in the Salt Lake area from KSL. Here are some recommendations to take advantage of the improving weather, no matter if it is in your town or the mountains.

Go on a low elevation hike. The sun is higher in the sky, melting the snow at lower elevations. These locations are mostly snow-free and conveniently located near the valley floors.

  • The Bonneville Shoreline Trail: Following the shoreline of the now dried-up Lake Bonneville, you can easily do a small section of this trail from one of these convenient access points (the trail extends for over 100 miles along the Wasatch Front).
  • Ensign Peak: This short climb above downtown and Capitol Hill affords beautiful views of the city and surrounding mountains.
  • Antelope Island State Park: Besides breathtaking views of the Great Salt Lake and desert landscapes that are uniquely Utahn, the park features excellent access to wildlife, including large animals like bison and, its namesake, the antelope. Antelope Island State Park is about a 1-hour drive north of Salt Lake City and has a $10-per-vehicle access fee.
See the sights. Explore these cultural, historical, and entertaining sites that Salt Lake City has on offer.
  • Temple Square: Located in the historic center of Salt Lake City, there are so many things to do at Temple Square you may need to visit more than once. Among other activities, this destination features tours, activities specifically for kids, the world’s largest genealogical library, and free performances by The Tabernacle Choir. You won’t be bored and admission is free.
  • Liberty Park and the Tracy Aviary: Located minutes from downtown, Liberty Park features great walking paths, playgrounds for children, and the Tracy Aviary. The aviary features daily events like live bird feedings and bird species from condors to colorful macaws. Liberty Park is free to access and daily admission to the aviary costs $11.95 for adults and $7.95 for children.
Other resources for activities. If none of these activities pique your interest, these online resources offer a virtual treasure trove of ideas.

Visitsaltlake.com: If you are looking to stay close to Salt Lake City, this website showcases dozens of activities in the area.

Visitutah.com: This Utah Office of Tourism website features some of the major attractions and adventures throughout the state.

Timeout.com: This website offers a list of 11 bona fide activities in Utah.

If you missed reading the First Quarter Market Review last week - CLICK HERE to view our electronic version.

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