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Skiing and Snowboarding

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 27, 2018

Snow is here and the ski and snowboard runs are opening one by one at our local ski resorts. Park City Magazine has the 10 Must-Dos at Deer Valley and Park City Mountain. The feeling of carving a turn on a meticulously groomed slope, weaving through a field of moguls, or -- the piece de resistance -- floating through a sparkling field of fresh powder is one of life’s great joys. But ask anyone who lives in or who’s visited Park City, and they’re sure to tell you that our town’s two resorts are about much more than the slopes. Here are five for each Deer Valley and Park City Mountain -- a curated list of experiences that are the difference between a good ski day and a great one.

Deer Valley Resort

1. Hire an instructor

2. Eat a bowl of turkey chili

3. Have a beer on the ski beach

4. Go for a snowshoe and roast s’mores

5. Make a reservation for Fireside Dining

Park City Mountain

1. Ride the Town Lift

2. Ski the resort from one end to the other

3. Go on a free guided tour of historic silver mining sites

4. Stop for après at the Corner Store

5. Take a sleigh ride and dinner at the Viking Yurt

Park City Magazine also shared Why Taking a Ski/Snowboard Lesson is Totally Worth It. Whether you’re a never-ever or have been on the slopes your whole life, a little bit of instruction can go a long way. I’ve never skied/snowboarded, but I’m really athletic. I think I can teach myself.  As a natural athlete, you might feel inclined to skip a lesson, particularly if you’re already a skier and want to learn to snowboard or vice versa. Truth is, you might sort of get it on your own, but you also might do it incorrectly or hurt yourself in the process.

I’m already a black-diamond-run skier/snowboarder, what else is there? Guess what! Even professional athletes have coaches because no matter what level you’ve reached, there’s always something you can improve upon. You don’t necessarily have to be doing the toughest terrain to be challenged, a good instructor will know how to make blue or even green terrain seem new and exciting.

No one knows the mountain better than a ski instructor. Do you really want to end up going on the same runs over and over again simply because you have no idea what’s out there? The resorts offer thousands of acres to slide on and an instructor is your one-way ticket to every type of terrain the mountain has to offer.

You get to skip the lines. Pay for a lesson and you get to skip the line. Pay for a private lesson, the line doesn’t exist. Enough said.

Learn what it means to be part of the mountain culture from an ambassador. Becoming a skier or snowboarder means being inducted into a very specific culture. Just like every other niche community in the world, there are “rules” of sorts. Get a lesson and learn the ins and outs of the mountain tribe from someone who lives and breaths it every day.

We will wrap up this week's blog with the top 10 of 100-plus Christmas events to celebrate the holidays in Utah. Start off the holidays with these family-friendly events throughout Utah. Note: This list is not all-inclusive, and events and prices are subject to change.

Christmas on Temple Square, Nov. 24-Dec. 22, times vary, select locations on Temple Square, free (lds.org/events)

Ryan Shupe and the Rubberband Christmas, Nov. 28, 7:30 p.m., Covey Center, 425 W. Center, Provo, $15-$22 (801-852-7007 or coveycenter.org)

“Amahl and the Night Visitors” and “A Christmas Carol,” Nov. 29-Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 1, 2 p.m., Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, $10-$20, free for junior high and high school students with ID at box office, no children under age 5 (801-957-3322 or grandtheatrecompany.com)

“Elf: The Musical,” Nov. 23-Dec. 22, dates and times vary, CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, Barlow Stage, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $19.50-$27 for adults, $17.50-$24.75 for seniors and students (801-298-1302 or centerpointtheatre.org)

“Scrooge: A Christmas Carol,” Nov. 23-Dec. 22, dates and times vary, Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, $15-$17 for adults, $14-$16 for students and seniors, $10-$12 for children ages 12 and younger (801-393-0070 or terraceplayhouse.com)

“A Christmas Carol,” Nov. 24-Dec. 22, dates and times vary, Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, $24-$29 for adults, $18-$23 for children ages 4-11 (801-226-8600 or haletheater.org)

“Festival of the Seas,” Nov. 27-Dec. 31, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Loveland Living Planet Aquarium, 12033 S. Lone Peak Parkway, Draper, $19.95 for adults, $16.95 for students, military and seniors, $14.95 for children ages 3-12, free for children under age 2 (801-355-3474 or thelivingplanet.com)

Gingerbread House Display, Nov. 27-Dec. 6, dates and times vary, Gale Center, 10300 S. Beckstead Lane, South Jordan, free (801-446-4357 or sjc.utah.gov)

Festival of Trees, Nov. 28-Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Mountain America Expo Center, 9575 S. State, Sandy, $7 for adults, $6 for seniors, $4 for children ages 2-11; Nov. 28 family day ticket, $20 for six immediate family members (intermountainhealthcare.org)

Alpine Living Nativity, Nov. 28-Dec. 3, excluding Sunday, times vary, 317 Heritage Hills Drive, Alpine, $25, tickets are limited and required, proceeds go to Toys For Tots (alpinelivingnativity.org)

Ski & Snowboard Championships

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 14, 2018

The U.S. Ski and Snowboard seeks hundreds to volunteer for largest ski competition in Park City since Olympics - It's about a month and a half until the 2019 FIS freeski, snowboard and freestyle World Championships kicks off with snowboard cross on Solitude Mountain on February 1st. Organizers expect the International Ski Federation event, which is set to take place at Deer Valley Resort, Park City Mountain Resort, and Solitude Mountain Resort, to be the largest winter sports event in the Park City area in terms of spectator turnout since the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The U.S. Ski and Snowboard is currently searching for more than 600 volunteers to help with the event.

The volunteers also get perks – they accumulate two day passes redeemable at any of the three resorts, for the first four shifts they work, which is the minimum, then two additional passes for each two additional shifts. They also get uniforms, like winter jackets, that serve as functional memorabilia from the event. To volunteer, go to 2019worldchamps.com

The U.S. is a massive, complex economy, and so too are the component economies of the 50 states that make up the whole. Business Insider combined six measures of labor-market and general economic health—unemployment rate, job growth, per-capita GDP, GDP growth, average weekly wages, and wage growth—to determine an overall score for each state's economy. The states (plus the District of Columbia) were then ranked.According to the report, Utah a top-10 economy, ranked 6th of 51. The state's Q1 2018 GDP growth rate of 3.2% was the second-highest, and its non-farm payroll job growth rate of 3.5% (between August 2017 and August 2018) was the highest in the country. View the full report here.

KSL recently shared the stories behind some of Utah's most unusual ski trail names - Utah is famous for its ski resorts, attracting people from all over the world. There are 14 ski resorts in Utah, with “10 world-class ski resorts within an hour radius of the Salt Lake airport,” according to Ski Utah. Some of the ski trails at the various resorts have unusual and interesting names and even more interesting back stories.

At Solitude Mountain Resort, you’ll find a black diamond run called Barrett’s Glade. The trail is named after Robert M. Barrett, who developed the ski resort after he made his fortune by uranium mining in Moab, according to the Solitude Mountain Resort website.

Snowbird Resort also has some interesting trail names and backstories, as reported by Ski Utah. Many of the trails were named after friends and family of Dick Bass. For instance, Silver Fox Trail was named after Bass’ partner, Ted Johnson, because he had premature gray hair and was nicknamed the "Silver Fox," Ski Utah stated.

Deer Valley Resort has followed the same tradition of naming ski runs after people. According to the International Skiing History Association, Stein’s Way is named after the late director of skiing at Deer Valley Resort Stein Eriksen. The founder of Deer Valley Resort, Edgar Stern, has his own run as well: Edgar’s Alley. Emily Summers, the senior communications manager for the Deer Valley Resort in Park City, said that 98 of Deer Valley Resort’s 103 ski runs are named after the original mining claims.

  1. Very interesting topic, thank you for posting.

 
 
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