Blog

Best State To Live In

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 19, 2019

According to the personal finance website WalletHub via KUTV it turns out that the Beehive State is one of the best states to live in the country, Utah is the ninth-best state to live in the United States. WalletHub stated in its Tuesday report that Utah was ranked ninth overall because of it has the lowest average weekly work hours out of all 50 states, along with ranking in the top 30 among the report's five key dimensions: affordability, economy, education and health, quality of life and safety.

WalletHub also shared in its report that Utah placed in the top 10 because of its rankings in various living conditions categories, including: 24th - Housing costs, 9th - Homeownership, 8th - Percent of the population in poverty and 6th - Income growth; percent of adults in fair or poor health.

Here are the top 10 best states to live in order: Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Colorado, Wisconsin, Virginia, Iowa, Utah and Idaho.

On the other side of the list, these were the 10 worst states to live in the country: Mississippi, Louisiana, New Mexico, Arkansas, Alabama, Alaska, South Carolina, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Kentucky.

As Park City and Salt Lake City continue to grow so do personalities, we found a great article that explains those personalities in - The Best Affordable City to Live for Every Myers-Briggs Personality Type - Your Myers-Briggs personality type can seem surprisingly apt: “Why yes,” you might say while reading your personality description, “I don’t like theories and abstracts, and I do leap before I look! This explains so much.” Sometimes, an internet quiz actually can go a long way in figuring out who you are. Or figuring out where to live.

Salt Lake City, Utah - ESTP. You like to move fast and break things. No shame in that. Your perfect city may be surprising: You’ll be packing up and moving to Salt Lake City, Utah. This western metropolis is one of the country’s best tech cities outside San Francisco. Keeping your attention may be a challenge, but with the state’s wide variety of outdoor activities—and a growing art scene—there’s no shortage of interesting activities.

Not sure what type you are? Take the test.

Moving on to Market Reports - we have our most recent market reports for Upper Deer Valley, Empire Pass, Lower Deer Valley, Deer Crest, Jordanelle, Old Town and the Canyons area. Have a great rest of your week.

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New Listings In Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 12, 2019

This week we are sharing our amazing listings available in Park City as well as our favorite dog trails in town.

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Our next property is 9528 N Red Hawk trail in The Preserve (pictured above). Lot #52 offers a flat building envelope, a mostly level driveway, Southern exposure with direct views of Park City's ski resorts! And only 40 minutes to Salt Lake City International Airport. This lot even has both a pond and a stream running through it. Park City, UT 84098 8.14 acres Offered at $650,000
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8065 Glenwild Drive Offered at $599,000 - 0.89 acres: This lot is located on an EYE-BROW of Glenwild Dr. to provide privacy and safety, with golf, mountain and ski views...next to common land. Glenwild Golf Course has been rated number one by Golf Digest since 2002 for Private Clubs in Utah...you may join the private club as a golfer or as a social member, or not at all. Glenwild is a gated community ideally located 9 Miles for Park City Old Town, and 33 minutes to SLC International Airport...and of course only a few minutes to the Park City's highly ranked ski resorts.
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1306 Preserve Drive 10.04 acres - Offered at $750,000- Just reduced in The Preserve from $785,000, Now $750,000 Located in Phase 3 of the Gated Preservescenic community. The Preserve is located where many dream of living...only 11 minutes to Park City's great ski resorts and Old Town...yet only about 35 minutes to Salt Lake City Int'l Airport...yes you can have it all...privacy, wildlife, views to kill for, acreage, location and that true Mountain Living in a ski resort town. This lot is south facing withaflat building site for ease of construction and lower construction costs. You will enjoy building your dream home on this lot because, of location, trees, great ski mountain views and a short driveway....Yes, you can have it all.
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7328 Pine Ridge Drive - 5 bedrooms, 6.00 bathrooms, 5015 square feet, 0.36 acres, Offered at $1,997,000. The striking stone & wood design is accented by custom wood trusses that only enhance the breathtaking mountain & meadow views. This home features 5 bedrooms, 6 baths, 5,015 sq ft and is currently under construction. This is a wonderful opportunity to own a brand new home in a wonderful neighborhood.Built by Design Construction Inc.,Steve Howe. Estimated completion for this new home to be summer 2019. Great location for both SLC (only 35 minutes to SLC International Airport and 12 minutes to Park City, this Mountain Contemporary home features a great flowing design for entertaining and family. Great room with two family rooms, 5 bdrms,and a flex room (office/6th bdrm/ski prep.rm/craft, or exercise room, etc). Home features Hickory hardwood flooring, granite & quartz, plus a Energy Rated Viking appliance Package. One of the comfort features of this home is the multiple heat zones to control your comfort, along with Passive Solar.
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2351 W Red Pine Court: 5 bedrooms, 7.00 bathrooms, 7500 square feet, 1.07 acres, Offered at $3,995,000. This Elegant Five bedroom/ seven Bath Private Luxury Residence is only 800 feet from the Sunrise/Retreat Ski Run on a private trail right to your property…then down to your home. The location is ideal to be so close to the new Canyons Village that is under development. After skiing back to your residence, relax in your hot tub and then retire to your private theater room. Your friends and family will enjoy sitting by you in the Fireplace Hearth Room as you prepare a delicious meal in your gourmet kitchen…or relax in the large living room, with large windows to allow plenty of light and views into your home. This home sits on one of the most desired lots in this area, due to its privacy with aspens and pine trees, which gives you privacy while being in the middle of it all!. This elegant home boasts radiant heat as well as forced air and central air conditioning. John Shirley is the Architect

Our Favorite Dog Friendly Trails - Out and about with your pup - Park City Magazine. In Park City, off-leash parks dot the landscape from Old Town to the Basin, making it easy to give your pooch a good workout and a little QT with other canines at the same time. While you’re out there, remember to keep your dog on lead as you enter and exit off-leash areas and parking lots, do bring and use poop bags, and practice 10 seconds of kindness while out on the trail: smile, wave, and say hello.

Off-Leash Parks/Areas - Grab your coffee mug and a Chuckit, and head to the grassy two acres adjacent to the Park City Library, appropriately known as Library Field (1255 Park Ave). Join other fur-parents there in the early morning or later in the evening to hang out in the neighbor-provided lawn chairs (the city is considering installing benches), throw balls for fetch-obsessed pups, and kibitz about town happenings. *Unfenced, no shade, high traffic (lots of dogs)

If there were such a thing as summer day camp for dogs, it would look a lot like the Willow Creek Dog Park (4460 Split Rail Ln), a splashing, fetching, and rough-housing doggie dream come true. The on-site pond has both a dock for jumpers and a zero-entry point for those who like to ease in for a dip. This park also features a 0.3-mile soft surface trail, a 24,000-square-foot fetch space, shaded benches, and an agility course. *Fenced, water, high traffic (lots of dogs)

The big dogs are separated from the small, literally, at Trailside Park (5715 Trailside Dr, just south of the bike park), where one side of this fenced area is for large breeds and the other for the little ones. Benches with shade shelters give owners a little civilized relaxation while their pooches take part in segregated playtime. Walkers can access Trailside’s one-mile off-leash trail from here, too. If you go, be sure to pay attention to the signs identifying areas where dogs must be on leash. *No shade, fenced

The Woods at Parley’s Lane (4275 Sunrise Dr, across Interstate 80 from the Weilenmann School) is a small, grassy half-acre with a few training/exercise features within a fenced area and an open lawn on the other half of the park. Amenities include bathrooms (with a drinking fountain), shaded benches, and a paved parking lot (i.e., no post-romp muddy footprints in your car). *Water, no shade, fence

Off-Leash Trails - The Run-A-Muk Trail (2387 Olympic Pkwy) is a favorite of both residents in the nearby Bear Hollow condos and staff of Kimball Junction–area dog-friendly workplaces. This rolling, two-mile path meanders through 43 acres of sage-covered hills and an aspen grove below the Utah Olympic Park. The entire area is fenced, so it’s OK to let your pup really stretch her legs and run wild. Note: The parking lot is not paved, so bring a towel during mud season to wipe your dog’s feet before she hops back in your car. *No shade, high traffic (lots of dogs), fenced, beware of wildlife

They don’t call Round Valley Park City’s playground for nothing. You’ll see plenty of other fit pets and their owners hiking or mountain biking here in the summer; Nordic skiing and snowbiking take center stage here in the winter. This sprawling 1,400-acre wonderland boasts 30 miles of trails, best accessed from the Quinn’s Junction trailhead (84098 Gilmor Way), where there’s water and year-round bathrooms. Not all of Round Valley is designated off-leash, however, so please respect the well-marked areas/trails where dogs must be tethered. *Water, no shade, high traffic (lots of dogs), unfenced, beware of wildlife

The usage guidelines were still in the works as of press time, but there’s still hope that at least parts of the high-altitude open space known as Bonanza Flat (accessed, for now, at the top of Guardsman Pass) will remain off-leash-friendly. Bloods Lake has historically been a popular destination for hiking and cooling off with a dog; if you go, be prepared with a leash in case the rules have changed. And don’t forget the poop bags: Bloods Lake is the water supply for the nearby Girl Scout camp. *Water, unfenced, beware of wildlife

Ramon Gomez, Jr. - Phone: (435) 640-0590 - ramon@rgomezjr.com

Beautify Your Backyard

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 22, 2019

Snow may have found its way to Park City over the weekend, but summer is around the corner. This week we have 8 Ways to Beautify Your Backyard, how to make a good impression with your home and visiting the dinosaurs of Utah.

Whether you're considering selling your house or you want to improve the appearance of your current property, there are many ways to beautify your backyard. A well-maintained backyard can make you enjoy coming home to relax and make you proud when you have friends and family over.

Here are nine tips to help you improve and beautify your backyard:

Add a Custom Shed - If you have random lawn equipment out on your yard, it can be unflattering. When you build a shed, you have a place to store your gardening and lawn equipment.

Create a Walkway - Most people put stone walkways in the front yard but neglect to add them to their backyard landscaping. Use stone or pavers to create a walkway that'll be inviting and give a clear path to your patio or pool. This will limit the amount of traffic going through your lawn, which could damage your grass. It will also make your yard more eye-appealing.

Pergolas, Decks and Patios - Creating a definitive entertainment location can be a beautiful addition to your backyard. By adding a pergola, deck, or patio, you're making a place that immediately attracts your guests. You can add flowers and potted plants. A grill and outdoor lighting around your pergola or patio will make for the perfect finishing touches.

Outdoor Kitchen - An outdoor kitchen is great for locations that don't get a lot of rain and for people who like to entertain often—include a built-in grill, mini fridge, sink, etc. Anything that you would need to access inside your house, include it in your outdoor kitchen. This will eliminate much of the foot traffic through your house and give you a beautiful backyard.

Paint Your Fence - If you have a fence in your yard that you don't necessarily like the looks of, you can paint it to make your backyard look better. Depending what look you want, you can either go with one standard color, or paint a mural on the fence to make it a talking point, rather than an eye sore.

Add Outdoor Seating - If you want your guests to feel comfortable and at home, add cozy outdoor seating to your backyard. Use wooden pallets, long benches and Adirondack chairs to give people an option of where they want to sit. Also, add a wrap around tree bench or a daybed and get creative with fabrics and color schemes.

Give the Kids a Place to Play - A tree house or playset can really add a cool note to your backyard. Get creative with walkways and ladders, add lighting and tree swings. The options are unlimited.

Add Eye-Popping Landscaping - Beautiful landscaping can be a wonderful addition to your backyard. Add hydrangeas, butterfly gardens and flower borders. You can change the entire look of your yard just by adding some pretty plants.

There are so many ways that you can beautify your backyard. With these tips you can have a stunning place for guests to visit and a relaxing spot to unwind at night.

Homes That Make a Good First Impression Have 5 Things in Common - My Domaine - It takes just 26 seconds for a guest to form an opinion of your home when they walk through the front door. What does your space say about you? While we try to resist the urge to judge, there's no doubt that first impressions count. Whether you're expecting guests or you're hoping to transform your spare room into a rental, experts agree there are five key areas that friends notice first about your house. Make these simple changes for a home that makes a lasting impression.

"A clean and welcoming entryway is crucial in leaving a good first impression—it's the first thing a guest sees!" says Cresswell. When transforming a home into a OneFineStay property, she says it's crucial that the entrance introduces a design theme. "A good first impression—that moment when a guest's breath is taken away—comes from stepping into a home with striking, deliberate design," she says. "Think bright, organized, and neutral. There's a place for the eclectic or quirky, but the entryway is not that place."

Instant fix: If you don't have time to restyle your entryway, Cresswell says updating wall décor is a simple way to unify the space. "Rather than cobbling a bunch of different frames or odds and ends together, choose a few specific things that pair perfectly. A precisely placed mirror can make a space look much bigger and brighter."

If you only pay attention to the look of your home, you're missing one of the most important factors that influence guests: fragrance. A Trulia study suggests it could also increase the value of your home; 30% of real estate agents said scent was the single most important sense during an open house and named vanilla and fresh scents as the most popular among house hunters.

Instant fix: Light a vanilla or citrus candle in the living room or near the entrance to infuse your home with an uplifting scent. If you're turning your home into a rental, be sure to use a tall lantern to shield the open flame. "Flowers always add an elegant but subtle fragrance, and baking cookies is another great way to get a welcoming air on arrival," says Cresswell.

It's time to address that discarded pile of magazines or strewn shoes—when it comes to first impressions, clutter counts. 73% of real estate agents said cleanliness is the most important sight-based feature during a viewing, possibly because unnecessary furniture and décor can make a space feel small.

"A foyer should have absolutely no clutter," says Cresswell. "Everything, from decorative knickknacks to practical things like shoes, should have a designated place. Keys should be hung neatly on a key rack, and shoes should have a rack or boot tray. As for cleanliness, dusting and vacuuming go a long way."

Instant fix: Use decorative baskets to mask mess. Position them by the doorway, under a coffee table, or beside a sofa to fake a cleaner-looking home without removing any items.

The color you choose to paint your home can have a big impact on its value. A report by Zillow Digs found that slate gray was among the most disliked colors among guests and cut the value of a home by over $1000. If you're painting a guest room, real estate agents told Trulia that white, ivory, and eggshell are the most appealing shades to create an inviting space.

Instant fix: If repainting your home isn't an option, pay attention to lighting. A carefully chosen floor lamp with the right colored bulb can subtly change the intensity of paint and is a perfect way to make a slate-gray room feel bright and fresh.

To turn a good first impression into a lasting one, Kaye says personal touches matter most. "A well-made bed is the most important thing you can offer your guests. It is the key to making your visitors feel completely comfortable, cozy, and relaxed!" When creating the brand's first-ever hotel, Kaye channeled five-star vibes with a few expert touches. "You should always provide at least two pillows of varying firmness per guest and dedicate a few sets of towels and sheets for guest use only. This will allow them to last longer than if you added them to your daily rotation of linens."

Instant fix: Caught off-guard by unexpected guests? Try this hotel-approved towel folding method for a thoughtful guestroom touch. "First, lay the towel flat on a surface, and smooth out any wrinkles. Then, starting with the long side of the towel, fold the length in thirds," says Kaye. "Grasp the short side, and fold the towel in half. Repeat this step," and you should be left with a neat square.

Looking for something to do this weekend, visit the Dinosaurs in Utah by Only in Your State - If you want to learn more about some of Utah’s first residents, there are several places to check out. There’s the Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point, the Natural History Museum in Salt Lake City, the Dinosaur Museum in Blanding and of course we have an entire Dinosaur National Monument in Vernal. There’s another dinosaur park in Utah that many people don’t even know about: the George S. Eccles Dinosaur Park in Ogden. Check it out!

Did dinosaurs live in Utah? They certainly did! Dinosaurs once roamed all over the Beehive State during the Mesozoic Era, 225 to 65 million years ago. Most of the dinosaur bones found it Utah are from dinosaurs who lived here during the Late Jurassic Era through the Late Cretaceous Era. Just imagine what it must have been like when these giant beasts walked around here.

Are there dinosaur fossils in Utah? Absolutely. Because of Utah’s dry climate and high altitude during the time of the dinosaurs, their bones were perfectly preserved. Utah is a world-renowned site for paleontologists who come here to study dinosaur fossils. Bones of many species have been found here, including Allosaurus, Seitaad, and several species of Sauropods, Ornithopods, and Ankylosaurs. Utah even has two dinosaurs named after it: the Utahceratops and the Utahraptor.

What museum has the best dinosaur exhibit in Utah? It’s hard to pick just one favorite dinosaur museum in Utah. Visit the Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point, the Dinosaur Museum in Blanding, and the Dinosaur Quarry Exhibit Hall at Dinosaur National Monument in Vernal.

What are the best dinosaur attractions in Utah? Dinosaur lovers living in Utah are lucky indeed, because we have tons of great dinosaur attractions here. In addition to the Eccles Dinosaur Park and the museums we’ve mentioned above, you’ll want to visit the Natural History Museum of Utah in Salt Lake City, the BYU Museum of Paleontology in Provo, the Utah Field House of Natural History in Vernal, the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry near Price, and the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site in St. George. You’ll also want to take a hike on the Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trail near Moab.

The George S. Eccles Dinosaur Park is open during the spring Monday – Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (the museum closes at 5:00 p.m.). During summer months, hours are extended until 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Admission is $7 for adults; $6 for seniors and students; $5 for children ages 2-12; free for children under two years old.

Dinosaurs in Utah by Only in Your State - If you want to learn more about some of Utah’s first residents, there are several places to check out. There’s the Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point, the Natural History Museum in Salt Lake City, the Dinosaur Museum in Blanding and of course we have an entire Dinosaur National Monument in Vernal. There’s another dinosaur park in Utah that many people don’t even know about: the George S. Eccles Dinosaur Park in Ogden. Check it out!

Did dinosaurs live in Utah? They certainly did! Dinosaurs once roamed all over the Beehive State during the Mesozoic Era, 225 to 65 million years ago. Most of the dinosaur bones found it Utah are from dinosaurs who lived here during the Late Jurassic Era through the Late Cretaceous Era. Just imagine what it must have been like when these giant beasts walked around here.

Are there dinosaur fossils in Utah? Absolutely. Because of Utah’s dry climate and high altitude during the time of the dinosaurs, their bones were perfectly preserved. Utah is a world-renowned site for paleontologists who come here to study dinosaur fossils. Bones of many species have been found here, including Allosaurus, Seitaad, and several species of Sauropods, Ornithopods, and Ankylosaurs. Utah even has two dinosaurs named after it: the Utahceratops and the Utahraptor.

What museum has the best dinosaur exhibit in Utah? It’s hard to pick just one favorite dinosaur museum in Utah. Visit the Museum of Ancient Life at Thanksgiving Point, the Dinosaur Museum in Blanding, and the Dinosaur Quarry Exhibit Hall at Dinosaur National Monument in Vernal.

What are the best dinosaur attractions in Utah? Dinosaur lovers living in Utah are lucky indeed, because we have tons of great dinosaur attractions here. In addition to the Eccles Dinosaur Park and the museums we’ve mentioned above, you’ll want to visit the Natural History Museum of Utah in Salt Lake City, the BYU Museum of Paleontology in Provo, the Utah Field House of Natural History in Vernal, the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry near Price, and the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site in St. George. You’ll also want to take a hike on the Mill Canyon Dinosaur Trail near Moab.

The George S. Eccles Dinosaur Park is open during the spring Monday – Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (the museum closes at 5:00 p.m.). During summer months, hours are extended until 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Admission is $7 for adults; $6 for seniors and students; $5 for children ages 2-12; free for children under two years old.

Skiing, Biking and Music in Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Mar 06, 2019

It is still snowing in Park City even with spring right around the corner. This week we wanted to share what is happening in the ski resort world, an upcoming bike challenge and the 2019 Deer Valley music festival lineup.

Bloomberg Businessweek has posted One Pass to Ski Them All Epic Vs. Ikon which shares the evolution of the ski industry - a must read. Alterra and Vail Resorts are going head to head snapping up resorts. Can they save skiing and make selling lift tickets a viable business?

Even among the world’s most polished ski resorts, Deer Valley—with its vast carpets of flawlessly groomed snow spread across four Utah peaks—was always conspicuously clubby. Skiers can pick up a free copy of the Wall Street Journal on their way to the fire, while instructors eat lunch in separate employee cafeterias, lest they mingle with the guests. “The idea was to replicate the service and experience of a five-star hotel,” says Bob Wheaton, who ran the resort for 22 years before stepping aside in January.

But when the lifts started cranking this season, things looked a little different. Among the affluent families were young couples and packs of Salt Lake City friends navigating the runs for the first time. The reason: Deer Valley had suddenly become a bulk-buy product. In 2017 a new conglomerate (later dubbed Alterra Mountain Co.) bought 11 of America’s most popular ski resorts and teamed with dozens more mountain owners to honor a single-season lift ticket called the Ikon Pass. Compared with buying a string of daily lift tickets for as much as $200 a pop, the Ikon Pass (which ranges from $599 to $899) can pay for itself in as few as three days. Only one other product is in direct competition with Ikon: The Epic Pass from Vail Resorts Inc. admits skiers to its aggressively expanding chain of 20 destinations including the company’s namesake ski area in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains.

Together, Alterra’s and Vail’s passes can be swiped at 58 North American resorts, as well as a handful of resorts in Oceania and Europe. The two competing conglomerates are trying to turn occasional skiers into frequent skiers and frequent skiers into serial skiers who incidentally buy a lot of midmountain beers and slopeside hotel rooms. Deer Valley and resorts like it have become a sort of research and development lab forecasting possible futures for the long-struggling ski industry. Skiing isn’t necessarily a bad business—it’s just lumpy and volatile, given natural cycles both economic and meteorological. To read the entire article - CLICK HERE.

Warmer weather will be here before we know it and so will all the spring and summer activities that come with it. In Park City there are amazing bike trails and one of the toughest biking competitions in the world. Here are The Most Challenging Mountain Bike Races You Can Enter in 2019, From XC to Downhill. With most of these events attract world-class athletes, set your sights on personal goals rather than winning. Keep training simple and focused on getting into the best shape possible. Simply finishing any of these events is a huge accomplishment in and of itself.

Park City P2P - One of the few true point-to-point races in North America, riders won’t traverse the same section of trail twice. This race is over 90% singletrack over a total distance of 75 miles with around 12,000 feet of climbing, all while traveling through two of the country’s premier mountain resorts. The P2P is a true adventure-style event, just like the old days of mountain bike racing. Since the course is not closed and there’s no guiding tape, racers will want to prepare, study the course map, and bring a GPS unit with the route pre-loaded. The mental challenge at the P2P is nearly as great as the physical on August 31, 2019. For the the entire article and the other 9 challenging courses - click here.

Looking for something a little less physically taxing, the Utah Symphony's 2019 Deer Valley Music Festival is bringing some big names to Park City this summer. Kristin Chenoweth, Marie Osmond, Indigo Girls, jazz trumpeter Chris Botti, and Broadway singer Renée Elise Goldsberry from the original cast of “Hamilton," are all set to perform with the Utah Symphony. Disney in Concert is also slated for a performance of the studio's biggest hits from its animated films. The concert series will also feature smaller, more intimate performances on Wednesdays at St. Mary's Church in Park City.

Below is the entire schedule of events for the concert series.

2019 DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

MAIN STAGE – DEER VALLEY SNOW PARK OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATER

2250 Deer Valley Dr. S, Park City, UT

Chris Botti with the Utah Symphony

June 28, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Chris Botti, trumpet

Utah Symphony

Grammy Award-winning trumpeter Chris Botti returns to kick off the Utah Symphony’s 2019 Deer Valley Music Festival with an evening of jazz under the stars.

Marie Osmond with the Utah Symphony

June 29, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Jerry Williams, conductor

Marie Osmond, vocalist

Utah Symphony

Marie Osmond has spent five decades entertaining audiences throughout the world. Her iconic talent is showcased with the Utah Symphony in this concert featuring “Paper Roses,” “Somewhere” from “West Side Story” and selections from her latest album.

Patriotic Celebration with Broadway star Hugh Panaro

July 5, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Michael Krajewski, conductor

Hugh Panaro, vocalist

Utah Symphony

Hugh Panaro is best known for playing the coveted role of Phantom in Broadway’s “The Phantom of the Opera” over 2,000 times. Audiences are invited to celebrate America as he performs hits from Broadway and patriotic favorites at this performance.

Bravo Broadway! Life is a Cabaret

July 6, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Randall Craig Fleischer, conductor

Morgan James, vocalist

Debbie Gravitte, vocalist

Hugh Panaro, vocalist

Utah Symphony

“Chicago.” “Cabaret.” “New York, New York.” The songwriting duo Kander and Ebb collaborated for more than 40 years and delivered hit after hit on the stage and screen. In Life is a Cabaret, the Utah Symphony salutes their contribution to the Great American Songbook while also featuring other Broadway favorites from musicals like “Hairspray,” “Les Misérables,” “Mamma Mia” and “Cats.”

A Tribute to Aretha, Queen of Soul

July 12, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Lucas Waldin, conductor

Capathia Jenkins, vocalist

Ryan Shaw, vocalist

Utah Symphony

Aretha, the “Queen of Soul,” created a legacy that spanned six decades. This concert features Capathia Jenkins and three time Grammy Award-nominee Ryan Shaw performing her iconic hits like “Respect,” “Think,” “A Natural Woman,” “Chain of Fools” and “Amazing Grace.” Created in conjunction with Lucas Waldin and Lesley Sabol

“E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”–Film in Concert with the Utah Symphony

July 13, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Utah Symphony

Director Steven Spielberg's heartwarming masterpiece is one of the brightest stars in motion picture history. Filled with unparalleled magic and imagination, “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial” follows the moving story of a lost little alien who befriends a 10-year-old boy named Elliott. Experience all the mystery and fun of their unforgettable adventure in the beloved movie that captivated audiences around the world, complete with John Williams’ Academy Award-winning score performed live by the Utah Symphony in sync to the film shown on the big screen. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial is a trademark and copyright of Universal Studios. Licensed by Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

Disney in Concert – A Magical Celebration

July 19, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Utah Symphony

The magic of Disney comes to Deer Valley in this multimedia showpiece featuring music from Disney’s “Coco,” “Frozen,” “Moana,” “Beauty and the Beast,” “The Little Mermaid,” “Aladdin” and more. Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts All rights reserved

Renée Elise Goldsberry with the Utah Symphony

July 20, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Renée Elise Goldsberry, vocalist

Utah Symphony

An evening of music with “Hamilton’s” Tony and Grammy Award-winning star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Her spiritually uplifting set includes music from “Rent” and “The Lion King” in addition to tributes to some of the strongest ladies to ever grace a stage such as Aretha Franklin, Nancy Wilson and Sarah Vaughan.

America in Space: A Cinematic Celebration

July 26, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Amy Andersson, conductor

Utah Symphony

America in Space honors the 50th Anniversary of NASA's moon landing featuring film scenes and music from beloved Hollywood films about astronauts, as well as new symphonic music from a NASA Exhibit and NASA documentary footage.

July 27, 2019 Concert

The program and artist for the July 27, 2019 concert at Deer Valley Snow Park Amphitheater will be announced at a later date.

Tchaikovsky’s "1812 Overture" and Piano Concerto No. 1

August 2, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Anna Fedorova, piano

Utah Symphony

Cannoneers of the Wasatch

Tchaikovsky’s explosive “1812 Overture” is paired with live cannon fire and a program that also features Ukrainian pianist Anna Fedorova performing Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1

An Intimate Evening with Kristin Chenoweth and the Utah Symphony

August 3, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Mary Campbell, conductor

Kristin Chenoweth, vocalist

Damien Bassman, drums

Utah Symphony

Kristin Chenoweth shares her memorable songs and show tunes from “Wicked,” “Glee” and more in this performance with the Utah Symphony.

The Music of The Rolling Stones: Circa 1969

August 9, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Brent Havens, conductor

Tony Vincent, vocalist

Utah Symphony

A multi-media celebration of the 50th Anniversary of two iconic albums—“Beggars Banquet” and “Let It Bleed.”

Indigo Girls with the Utah Symphony

August 10, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Indigo Girls

Utah Symphony

This concert features the Indigo Girls’ and the Utah Symphony performing larger-than-life arrangements of their songs that don’t sacrifice the emotional intimacy and honesty that have defined the Indigo Girls’ music for decades.

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA SERIES – ST. MARY’S CHURCH

1505 White Pine Canyon Road, Park City UT

Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto

July 10, 2019 (Wednesday) | 8 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Maria Ioudenitch, Violin

Utah Symphony

STRAVINSKY “Danses concertantes”

MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto

FAURÉ Suite from “Pelléas et Mélisande”

DEBUSSY “Suite bergamasque”

Schumann’s Cello Concerto

July 17, 2019 (Wednesday) | 8 p.m.

Christian Reif, conductor

Rainer Eudeikis, cello

Utah Symphony

BEETHOVEN “Coriolan Overture”

HONEGGER “Pastorale d’été”

R. SCHUMANN Cello Concerto

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 2

Beethoven & Dvoák: The Romantic Violin

July 24, 2019 (Wednesday) | 8 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Kathryn Eberle, violin

Utah Symphony

BEETHOVEN (arr. Mahler) String Quartet No. 11, "Serioso”

BEETHOVEN Romance No. 2 for Violin and Orchestra

DVOÁK Romance for Violin and Orchestra

RAVEL “Pavane for a Dead Princess”

MOZART Symphony No. 36, "Linz"

Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23

July 31, 2019 (Wed) | 8 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Aristo Sham, piano (2018 Gina Bachauer International Artists Piano Competition Silver Medalist)

Utah Symphony

MOZART Piano Concerto No. 23

ARVO PÄRT “If Bach had been a Beekeeper”

BRAHMS Serenade No. 2

Schubert’s Symphony No. 3

August 7, 2019 (Wed) | 8 p.m.

David Danzmayr, conductor

Bokyung Byun, Guitar

Utah Symphony

MOZART Divertimento No. 1

RODRIGO “Fantasia para un gentilhombre”

TAUSKÝ Coventry (Meditation for String Orchestra)

SCHUBERT Symphony No. 3

GALLERY SERIES

Small ensembles from the Utah Symphony performing at these concerts will be announced at a later date.

Gallery MAR

436 Main St, Park City, Utah

Monday, July 15, 2019 | Doors 6 p.m. | Performance 6:30 p.m.

Susan Swartz Studios

260 Main St, Park City, Utah

Monday, July 22, 2019 | Doors 6 p.m. | Performance 6:30 p.m.

www.deervalleymusicfestival.org.

Staying Warm

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jan 29, 2019

The winter cold is here as well as across the country with temperatures well below freezing. This week we wanted to share the 4th Quarter review, along with some ways to save on your heating bill and how to pack for mountain travel.

Real Estate update: Check out Gino's Market Update for the Q4 Market Update with Gino Blefari.

6 Ways to Save on Your Heating Bill This Winter - Whether you have an economical heat pump or a decades-old oil burner, you're probably looking for a way to cut your heating costs this winter. It's totally easy to keep warm (and on budget) with these expert tips:

You can't manage what you don't measure - The first step to managing your energy spending is inspecting it, says Josh Prigge, founder of Sustridge, a sustainability consulting firm in Las Vegas, Nevada. For most people, that means checking your electric bill. For others, it might mean calculating how many gallons of oil you've used (we see you Northeasterners) or how much you've spent each month on ancillary heating items (i.e. pellets for a pellet stove or wood for your fireplace.) Once you know where your money is going, you can come up with realistic use goals and monitor your progress against them.

Knowing your home's perfect temperature - To save money on your energy bills, set your thermostat to 65 degrees Fahrenheit. If that sounds a little too cold, being a little chilly may seem like a fair trade for all you'll save—that for every degree you lower your thermostat, you'll save approximately two percent of your overall heating bill.

Upgrade your technology - Affordable smart home devices can do wonders in reducing your overall energy use. A web-connected thermostat can be fiddled with from anywhere in the world, via your phone, which means you can lower your home's temperature after everyone has left for the day, says Steve Beeler, owner of RSC Heating and Air Conditioning. And don't forget to look for the Energy Star symbol on every home item you upgrade, from appliances to light bulbs. These use lower amounts of energy in the long term, which can mean lower bills (and more money in your pocket.)

Dodge those drafts - "Drafts are the largest source of heating and cooling loss in the home," says Mark Tyrol, the owner of Battic Door, a Mansfield, Massachusetts-based home energy conservation product company. Since warm air can escape and cold air can enter through poorly insulated areas, keeping them untouched is essentially like leaving your windows open all winter long.

Consider purchasing a cover for your house fan, a draft blocker for your dryer vent, a plug for your fireplace, and a cover for your attic stairs. Of course, cracks around your windows and doors, and pipes that run through exterior walls can leak your precious warm air out, too. Enter weatherstripping and added insulation: It can be as cheap as a rolled-up towel under a drafty door or a $13 window insulator kit.

Hot tip: Once your windows are well-insulated, consider keeping the curtains open to let the sunlight in. The added heat from the sunshine may have a big impact in small rooms.

Don't forget to winterize - Hate to break it to you, but summer is over. Though it may seem like an added headache to swap out your storm windows and remove those air conditioning units (or covering them up if they're permanently installed), these small steps can save you some money, says Jordana Viuker Brennan, founder of Confident Buildings, a New York-based energy-use consultancy.

Perform routine maintenance - The biggest heating cost? That emergency repair session after your unit goes kaput. But, just like your grandma says, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

"If you invest 80 percent of the service work into preventative service, you will only need 20 percent or less in emergency work," says Dave Miller, the owner of South Carolina-based Superior Heating & Air.

Prevent the big messes with these small tasks: Replace your air filters every season (Miller suggests replacing them once a month to prevent the build up of particles in your heating system), have an HVAC specialist calibrate your thermostat, and occasionally pour a cap of bleach down your AC unit's drain line to prevent algae and other deposits from building up.

And remember: These steps save more than just costs—they could save your life as well. Regular maintenance of fuel-burning appliances (like your furnace, water heater, and clothes dryer), can prevent fires and carbon monoxide build-up, says Larry Oglesby, director of Remington College's HVAC program. Take the time this winter to make sure everything is property vented, so you can rest assured as you cozy up.

What to Pack for a Ski/Snowboarding Vacation by Ski Utah is a good reminder for us locals, but great to share with family and friends coming into town - Packing for a ski trip can be a challenge.  Most of the clothes are bulky and traveling with gear can be a hassle. Clothes make a difference between enjoying your trip and being miserable. For snow-play, leave the cotton at home and stick to wool or synthetic fabrics. Once cotton gets wet, from either sweat or snow, it won’t dry out, leaving you damp and cold.

In general, you want to pack pieces that can be mixed and matched to keep you warm and looking good. Mid layers are a good example of something you can wear on and off the slopes. However, you may want to pack separate base layers for snow sports and relaxing, because if you’re like me, the skiing set will get stinky during the day.

On the slopes

Base: Your base layer should be wool or synthetic. A mid- to heavy-weight is good depending on the rest of your gear. I wear a heavyweight Hot Chillys base with my ski pants and stayed toasty and warm without a mid layer. On top, I used a synthetic base plus a mid layer.

Mid: You may or may not need this layer depending on the rest of your gear. Fleece works well. On top, I use a zipped jacket or 1/4 zip that I can open when I get warm.

Outer: This includes your ski pants and jacket. Make sure this layer is waterproof, especially if you’re a beginning skier or rider, because you’ll spend a lot of time on your butt in the snow. Ski pants and jackets are insulated to varying degrees, which will influence which other layers you choose. My jacket isn’t insulated, so I really layer-up on top, sometimes using two light base layers and a mid layer underneath. My pants have some insulation built in so I only need the Hot Chillys bottoms.

If you don’t own, or want to pack, ski pants and coat, try using a rental service such as Jans.com. Simply order what you need online or stop in the store.

The important-small-stuff: In addition to your layers, on the slopes you’ll need gloves, ski goggles or sunglasses, a neck warmer such as a buff, cap, balaclava, or beanie that will fit under your helmet; and ski socks. Ski socks should be snuggly fitted and taller than regular socks making them a better choice with ski boots. Trust me; you don’t want socks bunching up inside of your ski boots, ouch! Hand and foot-warmers are a pleasure to have on really cold days. Buy them off the mountain for the best deal. Depending on the type of skiing you have planned, you may need a backpack and hydration options.

Off the slopes - You’ll be worn out by the end of the day, so pack some comfy clothes to relax in. Keep thinking in layers to give yourself more outfit options and save room. Again, they should include bases, mid-layers such as a snuggly fleece and an outer layer. The difference is that the outer layer doesn’t need to be waterproof and the other could include some cotton such as jeans.

Base: I like a thin bottom base, such as silk, under my pants. Sometimes I skip this and just wear one layer after hours if I won’t be outside much.

Mid: This is the piece you’ll likely wear the most, so choose something that will pair well with all of your outfits and that fits comfortably. There are so many sharp looking options available, it may be hard to choose just one, but for the sake of space, try.

Outer: This can be any stylish coat, sized to fit a couple of layers underneath. By using layers, you can avoid packing your biggest, most bulky coat. Pick something that is wind and rain resistant for the most versatility.

The important-small-stuff: Gloves, scarves and caps will round out your outfits without taking up much space. Make sure you pack some waterproof boots that can take a tromp through the snow. Sorel makes a bunch of options that get the job done while looking good. I didn’t feel like a Salt Lake City local until I owned a pair. Then I found out they make all-rubber high-heels, not my grandma’s idea of practical snow boots, but they rock!

And don’t forget… Pack all of your usual travel items such as toiletries, undergarments, swimsuit, and maybe some sweats for the hotel room. A few more items you shouldn’t forget: sunscreen, snacks, and lip balm with sunscreen. Sunscreen is very important due to the high elevation and reflection up from the snow. Make sure you protect your face and lips well.

Carry On - In a perfect world, there wouldn't be a need for stores that sell lost luggage...but bags DO get lost, treating travelers to an uncomfortable arrival. But you can plan for the worst. Pack a day's worth of basics in your carry on. First, pack any prescriptions or supplies that would be a disaster to go without. Next, pack a change of clothes, base layers, ski socks, water-resistant boots, coat, gloves, and cap. With this much, you could rent everything else you would need to ski/ride, plus be comfortable off the slopes until your bags catch up.

What about gear? You have a few options for gear. It can be a hassle to check your board, skis or poles on the airline for a short trip, so you might want to rent them. However, boots are an important piece that I would go ahead and pack. I’d also prefer my own helmet, which doesn’t take much space if you stuff it full of other items such as gloves and beanies.

Do research on rentals ahead of time, there are rental options both on and off the mountain that may even give you the chance to demo some new gear you’ve wanted to try. Some will even give you a discount for reserving online in advance. Short on time? Have all of your rentals delivered so you can get on the snow faster. Both Ski Butlers and Ski 'N See Delivery will bring gear directly to you.

If all of these new clothes and accessories sound expensive, read my post: Dressing for cold weather travel on a budget. Don’t be the person who shows up in jeans and ends up miserable two hours into the lesson. Make time to “beg, borrow or steal” some decent clothes so you can focus on learning to ski, not trying to stay warm and dry.

Winter Activities

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jan 09, 2019

This week we wanted to share Things To Do This Winter Outside Of Skiing And Snowboarding - Many come to Utah for skiing and snowboarding, but 'The Greatest Snow on Earth' can provide residents and visitors with so much more! Check out all these activities that have nothing to do with skiing or snowboarding.

Ice Skating - Looking for a winter activity the whole family can enjoy? Visit any of Utah's many ice skating rinks for a fun activity for any skill level. From the warmer indoor rinks to watching the snow fall as you skate outside, ice skating is a quintessential winter time activity. Click here for more information on some of Utah's most popular ice skating rinks.

Snowshoeing - Love hiking and/or backpacking in the summer and looking to get out in nature during the winter? Strap on a pair of snowshoes and hit the trails! Snowshoes provide a fun and easy way to get out into nature and off the beaten path. Participants can rent snowshoes for as low at $20 a day from local sporting outlets and many outfitters offer guided tours. For more information on snowshoeing in Utah,click here.

Tubing And Sledding - Looking for a winter thrill? Try tubing and sledding! Whether you want to visit any number of supermarkets or outdoor retailers and buy your own tube or sled, or you'd rather rent a tube and slide down a man made course (usually they even transport you back up to the top of the hill!), tubing and sledding is fun for the whole family. Check out these locations for tubing parks and some of the best sledding around the Wasatch Front and Back!

Snowmobiling - Ready to go full throttle and race your friends through the powder? Jump and a snowmobile for the jolt of adrenaline you've been looking for. Whether you want to pave your own trail in the backcountry or take a leisurely ride through nature, Utah has some of the best snowmobiling in the country. Click here for more information.

Revisit The Olympics - What would it be like to be an Olympic athlete? With the Utah Olympic Park, you can find out! Take a ride down the bobsled track, watch ski jumping and areal practice, wander the Alf Engen Ski Museum, experience the virtual reality ride, and so much more!

January Events

Now - 4/7: Utah Grizzlies Hockey, West Valley City

Now- 4/10: Utah Jazz Basketball, Salt Lake City

Now - 1/21: Christmas in the Wizarding World, Sandy

Now - 2/24: The Gallivan Center Ice Rink, Salt Lake City

Now - 2/3: Station Park Holiday Ice Rink, Farmington

Now - 2/23: Cosmic Skating, Utah Olympic Oval

1/11 - 1/13: Canned Heat, Park City

1/12 - 2/9: 12th Annual Powder Mountain Grom Fest, Powder Mountain

1/17 - 1/19: An Evening with Rita Coolidge, Park City

1/24 - 2/3: Sundance Film Festival, Park City

1/25: Bill Engvall, Kamas

1/25 - 1/26: All Star Monster Truck Tour, West Valley City

1/30: Kelly Clarkson: Meaning Of Life Tour, Salt Lake City

1/30 - 3/3: Wicked, Salt Lake City

2/1 - 2/2: 2019 Wasatch Yeti Bash, Ogden

2/1 - 2/10: FIS World Championship, Deer Valley Resort, Park City Mountain, and Solitude

 

Skiing and Snowboarding

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 27, 2018

Snow is here and the ski and snowboard runs are opening one by one at our local ski resorts. Park City Magazine has the 10 Must-Dos at Deer Valley and Park City Mountain. The feeling of carving a turn on a meticulously groomed slope, weaving through a field of moguls, or -- the piece de resistance -- floating through a sparkling field of fresh powder is one of life’s great joys. But ask anyone who lives in or who’s visited Park City, and they’re sure to tell you that our town’s two resorts are about much more than the slopes. Here are five for each Deer Valley and Park City Mountain -- a curated list of experiences that are the difference between a good ski day and a great one.

Deer Valley Resort

1. Hire an instructor

2. Eat a bowl of turkey chili

3. Have a beer on the ski beach

4. Go for a snowshoe and roast s’mores

5. Make a reservation for Fireside Dining

Park City Mountain

1. Ride the Town Lift

2. Ski the resort from one end to the other

3. Go on a free guided tour of historic silver mining sites

4. Stop for après at the Corner Store

5. Take a sleigh ride and dinner at the Viking Yurt

Park City Magazine also shared Why Taking a Ski/Snowboard Lesson is Totally Worth It. Whether you’re a never-ever or have been on the slopes your whole life, a little bit of instruction can go a long way. I’ve never skied/snowboarded, but I’m really athletic. I think I can teach myself.  As a natural athlete, you might feel inclined to skip a lesson, particularly if you’re already a skier and want to learn to snowboard or vice versa. Truth is, you might sort of get it on your own, but you also might do it incorrectly or hurt yourself in the process.

I’m already a black-diamond-run skier/snowboarder, what else is there? Guess what! Even professional athletes have coaches because no matter what level you’ve reached, there’s always something you can improve upon. You don’t necessarily have to be doing the toughest terrain to be challenged, a good instructor will know how to make blue or even green terrain seem new and exciting.

No one knows the mountain better than a ski instructor. Do you really want to end up going on the same runs over and over again simply because you have no idea what’s out there? The resorts offer thousands of acres to slide on and an instructor is your one-way ticket to every type of terrain the mountain has to offer.

You get to skip the lines. Pay for a lesson and you get to skip the line. Pay for a private lesson, the line doesn’t exist. Enough said.

Learn what it means to be part of the mountain culture from an ambassador. Becoming a skier or snowboarder means being inducted into a very specific culture. Just like every other niche community in the world, there are “rules” of sorts. Get a lesson and learn the ins and outs of the mountain tribe from someone who lives and breaths it every day.

We will wrap up this week's blog with the top 10 of 100-plus Christmas events to celebrate the holidays in Utah. Start off the holidays with these family-friendly events throughout Utah. Note: This list is not all-inclusive, and events and prices are subject to change.

Christmas on Temple Square, Nov. 24-Dec. 22, times vary, select locations on Temple Square, free (lds.org/events)

Ryan Shupe and the Rubberband Christmas, Nov. 28, 7:30 p.m., Covey Center, 425 W. Center, Provo, $15-$22 (801-852-7007 or coveycenter.org)

“Amahl and the Night Visitors” and “A Christmas Carol,” Nov. 29-Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 1, 2 p.m., Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, $10-$20, free for junior high and high school students with ID at box office, no children under age 5 (801-957-3322 or grandtheatrecompany.com)

“Elf: The Musical,” Nov. 23-Dec. 22, dates and times vary, CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, Barlow Stage, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, $19.50-$27 for adults, $17.50-$24.75 for seniors and students (801-298-1302 or centerpointtheatre.org)

“Scrooge: A Christmas Carol,” Nov. 23-Dec. 22, dates and times vary, Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, $15-$17 for adults, $14-$16 for students and seniors, $10-$12 for children ages 12 and younger (801-393-0070 or terraceplayhouse.com)

“A Christmas Carol,” Nov. 24-Dec. 22, dates and times vary, Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, $24-$29 for adults, $18-$23 for children ages 4-11 (801-226-8600 or haletheater.org)

“Festival of the Seas,” Nov. 27-Dec. 31, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Loveland Living Planet Aquarium, 12033 S. Lone Peak Parkway, Draper, $19.95 for adults, $16.95 for students, military and seniors, $14.95 for children ages 3-12, free for children under age 2 (801-355-3474 or thelivingplanet.com)

Gingerbread House Display, Nov. 27-Dec. 6, dates and times vary, Gale Center, 10300 S. Beckstead Lane, South Jordan, free (801-446-4357 or sjc.utah.gov)

Festival of Trees, Nov. 28-Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Mountain America Expo Center, 9575 S. State, Sandy, $7 for adults, $6 for seniors, $4 for children ages 2-11; Nov. 28 family day ticket, $20 for six immediate family members (intermountainhealthcare.org)

Alpine Living Nativity, Nov. 28-Dec. 3, excluding Sunday, times vary, 317 Heritage Hills Drive, Alpine, $25, tickets are limited and required, proceeds go to Toys For Tots (alpinelivingnativity.org)

Ski & Snowboard Championships

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 14, 2018

The U.S. Ski and Snowboard seeks hundreds to volunteer for largest ski competition in Park City since Olympics - It's about a month and a half until the 2019 FIS freeski, snowboard and freestyle World Championships kicks off with snowboard cross on Solitude Mountain on February 1st. Organizers expect the International Ski Federation event, which is set to take place at Deer Valley Resort, Park City Mountain Resort, and Solitude Mountain Resort, to be the largest winter sports event in the Park City area in terms of spectator turnout since the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The U.S. Ski and Snowboard is currently searching for more than 600 volunteers to help with the event.

The volunteers also get perks – they accumulate two day passes redeemable at any of the three resorts, for the first four shifts they work, which is the minimum, then two additional passes for each two additional shifts. They also get uniforms, like winter jackets, that serve as functional memorabilia from the event. To volunteer, go to 2019worldchamps.com

The U.S. is a massive, complex economy, and so too are the component economies of the 50 states that make up the whole. Business Insider combined six measures of labor-market and general economic health—unemployment rate, job growth, per-capita GDP, GDP growth, average weekly wages, and wage growth—to determine an overall score for each state's economy. The states (plus the District of Columbia) were then ranked.According to the report, Utah a top-10 economy, ranked 6th of 51. The state's Q1 2018 GDP growth rate of 3.2% was the second-highest, and its non-farm payroll job growth rate of 3.5% (between August 2017 and August 2018) was the highest in the country. View the full report here.

KSL recently shared the stories behind some of Utah's most unusual ski trail names - Utah is famous for its ski resorts, attracting people from all over the world. There are 14 ski resorts in Utah, with “10 world-class ski resorts within an hour radius of the Salt Lake airport,” according to Ski Utah. Some of the ski trails at the various resorts have unusual and interesting names and even more interesting back stories.

At Solitude Mountain Resort, you’ll find a black diamond run called Barrett’s Glade. The trail is named after Robert M. Barrett, who developed the ski resort after he made his fortune by uranium mining in Moab, according to the Solitude Mountain Resort website.

Snowbird Resort also has some interesting trail names and backstories, as reported by Ski Utah. Many of the trails were named after friends and family of Dick Bass. For instance, Silver Fox Trail was named after Bass’ partner, Ted Johnson, because he had premature gray hair and was nicknamed the "Silver Fox," Ski Utah stated.

Deer Valley Resort has followed the same tradition of naming ski runs after people. According to the International Skiing History Association, Stein’s Way is named after the late director of skiing at Deer Valley Resort Stein Eriksen. The founder of Deer Valley Resort, Edgar Stern, has his own run as well: Edgar’s Alley. Emily Summers, the senior communications manager for the Deer Valley Resort in Park City, said that 98 of Deer Valley Resort’s 103 ski runs are named after the original mining claims.

Favorite Ski Town

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 07, 2018

The polls may have closed last night, but take a moment to Vote For Your Favorite Ski Town and Ski Resort - Five Utah Ski towns and resorts are nominated in this year’s USA Today’s poll, including Park City as Best Ski Town and Deer Valley as best ski resort. USA Today’s 10 best allows readers to vote on the 10 best ski towns and resorts in North America. Of the 20 nominees for best Ski Town, Park City, was described by the paper as having a ”feel of a historic Wild West mining town with the amenities of a world-class ski resort.” Voting for the poll goes until November 26th Click here to cast your vote.

Park City Mountain, the largest ski resort in the U.S., is scheduled to open for the 2018-19 season on Wednesday, Nov. 21. The lifts are scheduled to start spinning at both the Park City Mountain Village and Canyons Village at 9 a.m. This season, Park City Mountain will debut several new resort enhancements, including a new beginner learning area at High Meadow Park, a transformation of the iconic Mid-Mountain Lodge, an expansion of the popular Cloud Dine restaurant and additional snowmaking.

Opening day events are scheduled to begin at 8:30 a.m. at the Park City Mountain Village with live music, giveaways and complimentary hot chocolate and coffee. The first chair will leave at 9 a.m. on the Payday lift followed by a ceremonial banner-breaking. The entertainment will continue at 2:30 p.m. with a performance by the Alicia Stockman Band on the Payday deck.

At Canyons Village, the Cabriolet, Red Pine Gondola, Frostwood Gondola, Saddleback lift and new High Meadow Park learning area are also scheduled to open. Canyons Village will host a live performance by the Tony Oros Trio at 2:30 p.m. that afternoon. Both Canyon Mountain Sports at Canyons Village and Legacy Sports at the Park City Mountain Village will be open for rentals. Find out more in Luxury Travel Magazine's full article.

Looking to get ready for the holidays and the chilly temperatures, here are 5 Ways to Make Your Bedroom Winter-Ready This Weekend.

1. Clear the clutter - Nothing kills peaceful rest like the thrum of anxiety caused by clutter. Get everything that doesn't belong in the bedroom out, and put everything that's out of place in the bedroom away. Try the "make and pile" method if you're stuck.

2. Clean deeply - Wash the curtains, dust the ceiling fan, vacuum under the bed, the whole shebang. As always, clean top to bottom and don't forget the details like polishing wood furniture and cleaning the glass in picture frames.

3. Freshen your mattress and pillows - Take off your current linens and address what's under them. Clean your mattress by vacuuming it, spot cleaning it, deodorizing it, and airing it out for a bit. Wash your pillows or at least fluff them in a hot dryer to reduce dust mite allergen. If your mattress is a spring mattress, flip and/or rotate it.

4. Switch out your linens - Now is the time to swap the percale for the flannel and put the down comforter in the duvet cover. Wash your comforter if it needs it. If you're a millennial who goes top sheet-less, mind these tips for keeping clean without a top sheet.

5. Add a little something extra - Now it's time for the fun stuff. Maybe you'll add a couple fluffy pillows to make in-bed movie nights extra nest-like, or a luscious knit throw draped across the foot of the bed. A warm robe is like an extension of your bedroom when you have to venture outside of it, and a faux sheepskin rug makes the thought of dipping your toes into the frigid morning bearable. When you're done, you'll have a bedroom den that will not only support the rest you need but will make you wish hibernation could be a human thing.

November Events:

11/8: An Evening with David Sedaris, Salt Lake City

11/13: Twenty One Pilots, Salt Lake City

11/15 - 11/18: Disney on Ice Celebrates 100 Years of Magic, Salt Lake City

11/16 - 2/24: The Gallivan Center Ice Rink, Salt Lake City

11/18 - 11/21: IBSF North American Cup, Park City

11/20 - 4/20, Saturdays: Winter Farmers Market, Salt Lake City

11/20: Trans-Siberian Orchestra 2018, Salt Lake City

11/20 - 12/22: North Pole Express, Heber City

11/23 - 1/1: Temple Square Christmas Lights, Salt Lake City

11/26: Wasatch Speaker Series: Bill Nye, Salt Lake City

11/28 - 12/1: Christkindlmarkt, Salt Lake City

11/29: Andrea Bocelli, Salt Lake City

11/30: Metallica: WorldWired Tour 2018, Salt Lake City

12/1: Jim Gaffigan: The Fixer Upper Tour, Salt Lake City

12/1: Santa Pub Crawl, Park City

Thanksgiving Events

11/22: 2018 Thanksgiving Day Races, Bountiful

11/22: Thanksgiving at Snowbird, Snowbird

11/22: Grand Ballroom Thanksgiving Buffet, Salt Lake

11/22: 2018 Pilgrim 5K, Thanksgiving Point

11/22: Provo Turkey Trot, Provo

Third Quarter Market Review

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 17, 2018

The third quarter report provides an overview of the Summit and Wasatch County real estate markets. We believe it’s important that our clients have access to information that facilitates thoughtful real estate decisions. The Park City market remains highly segmented. Our town, its neighborhoods and outlying areas differ significantly in terms of price, home type, features, and amenities. For example, while Park Meadows and Upper Deer Valley share the same zip code, average and median home prices in these two neighborhoods vary significantly. As Alterra has announced enhancements throughout Deer Valley® Resort (including the new Ikon Pass) and Vail Resorts® is continuing their commitment to Park City Mountain, focusing on upgrades throughout Canyons Village. We believe these factors will continue to drive our markets in a positive direction. Additionally, we anticipate significant activity in the Mayflower area over the coming years with positive benefits for our community. In the meantime, our clients continue to find numerous buying opportunities in Summit and Wasatch counties especially in the Heber Valley, Jordanelle, and East Summit County neighborhoods. Data interpretation, judgment, and historical context are key elements in making informed decisions: Contact us for guidance on navigating our marketplace.

Park City Proper - The heart of Park City spans from the world-class Deer Valley® Resort to the iconic white barn, McPolin Farm. Park City Proper includes the neighborhoods: Old Town, Thaynes Canyon, Deer Valley, Aerie, Prospector, and Park Meadows.

Snyderville Basin begins at the iconic white barn, McPolin Farm, off Highway 224 and includes the neighborhoods: The Canyons, The Colony, Sun Peak, Bear Hollow, Silver Springs, Old Ranch Road, Kimball, Pinebrook, Summit Park, Jeremy Ranch, Glenwild, Silver Creek, Trailside Park, Silver Creek, Promontory, and Quinn’s Junction.
Jordanelle is the picturesque area surrounding the Jordanelle Reservoir. Just minutes from Park City this area includes communities such as Hideout Canyon, Tuhaye, Victory Ranch, Soaring Hawk, and more.
Heber Valley - Open space and farmland encompass the scenic Heber Valley. This area features remarkable views of Mount Timpanogos and countless recreational opportunities. The Heber Valley includes the neighborhoods of Midway, Charleston, Provo Canyon, Heber, Daniel, and Timberlakes.
East Summit County - Known as the “Gateway to the Uintas,” the charming Kamas Valley within East Summit County boasts endless outdoor activities. The East Summit County area includes the neighborhoods of Woodland, Francis, Kamas, Marion, Oakley, Weber Canyon, Peoa, Browns Canyon, Wanship, Hoytsville, Coalville, Echo, and Henefer.

Hiking & Shot Skis

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 26, 2018

As the air becomes crisp and the cool mornings roll in we have a wonderful couple of weeks to take in the magnificent colors happening in the mountains. Park City Magazine has a great article this week that we wanted to share as there is only a short window for watching the leaves change in the Best Hikes for Leaf Peeping in Park City. The shortest, most colorful season of the year is upon us. Early autumn reds and oranges are popping up on the slopes and soon the hillsides will be covered in gold. In between the rain and snow, we recommend you get out on the trail to catch the magnificent display. Here are our top picks for leaf peeping this season. 

Summit Park’s Over Easy Trail - Nestled up in the forest along the I-80 between Park City and Salt Lake City, the entire Summit Park trail system is a great place for leaf peeping. If you’re on foot, hop onto the 2.5-mile, out-and-back Over Easy neighborhood walking trail, where you can meander through shady pine forest and alpine meadows. This hike is easy and perfect for the whole family. Dog owners take note: the north section of the trail sits in Salt Lake County where dogs aren’t allowed.

McLeod Creek Trail - Want to take in a view of all the area surroundings? The all ages–friendly McLeod Creek Trail runs all the way from Park City proper to Kimball Junction. You can bike the whole paved and crushed-gravel path over bridges and along the creek (and even connect to the Millennium Trail which runs all the way to Summit Park) or just walk a smaller section.

Iron Canyon Trail - For a short, moderately steep hike with a great pay-off, head up Iron Canyon Trail. The trailhead can be accessed at the top of Iron Canyon Drive, the road turns into dead end and the trail is right in the middle (exit Hwy 224 on Meadows Drive). Lush aspens and pine groves drop you in the midst of a dazzling display of yellow and deep green while the overlook at the top offers a wider view of the colorful ski slopes of Park City Mountain Resort. The hike is roughly 2.25 miles out-and-back.

Fantasy Ridge - Not one for the faint of heart, Fantasy Ridge is a grueling hike up to the 9,990-foot summit we all love to race to on powder days. Before even getting to Fantasy Ridge, you’ll need to take the 1.6 mile Tombstone trail from the Red Pine Lodge. Once you reach Tombstone Peak, you can hop onto Fantasy Ridge where sweeping views of Park City await.

Crescent Lift Trail Loops - Once you head up Crescent Lift (open through Oct. 22) at the Park City Base Area, you have the option to create multiple loops of varying lengths. After hopping off the lift, take Crescent Ridge Road to Three Candles and take a right onto Keystone. At the end of Keystone Trail, the woods break into the open meadow of Shadow Lake. Take a loop around the lake and keep your eyes peeled for moose, but don’t get too close. You can return to the Crescent lift via the Jupiter Access Road to the Apex trail, which hooks back into Keystone, Three Candles, the Crescent Ridge Road, and then, finally, the top of the Crescent lift.

Silver Lake Trail - Start your journey at Deer Valley’s Silver Lake Lodge and alternatively traverse dense forest and open ski runs. Along the way and from the 9,346-foot summit, you’ll have plenty of opportunity to bask in the glorious vistas of the Jordanelle Reservoir, framed by foliage. Unfortunately, summer lift operations have ended at Deer Valley, so plan to hike back on your own.

Clayton Peak - Guardsman Pass gets so decked out in fall colors (before most of a lowlands), you may be tempted just to drive all the way back down through Big Cottonwood Canyon. There are plenty of hikes in the area to choose from, but if you’re looking for something relatively short with views from a summit, check out Clayton Peak. It’s moderately steep, but relatively short (2.5-3 miles out and back) and has some excellent 360-degree views of the area, including Deer Creek and the Jordanelle Reservoirs, Brighton Resort, and Mt. Timpanogos. Chances are you’ll even run into a bit of snow up there. You can access the trail from the same parking lot as Bloods Lake, just head up along the ridge rather than down to the lake. See you on the trails!

Don't forget to mark your calendars as the 3rd Annual Park City Shot Ski Event is coming up on October 13, 2018 at 2pm on Main Street. This year, the event invites 1,275 shot-takers to break Breckenridge’s record set in January 2018 of 1,266 participants and 425 skis. A $25 ticket includes a spot on the shot-ski, one souvenir shot glass and a token to enjoy a High West specialty drink at one of several after-party locations. All proceeds will go to Park City Sunrise Rotary Club’s Grant Program for 20 community organizations. For more info click here.

Looking to add some more excitement to your calendar, here are the upcoming Egyptian Theatre Events:

An Evening with Judy Collins: October 11th-13th

Jesse Colin Young: October 18th-20th

The SteelDrivers: October 25th-27th

Foghat: November 1st-4th

Melissa Manchester: November 9th-11th

For more info click here.

A Fresh Start to Spring

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Mar 27, 2018

We are always looking to share the latest in news regarding our lovely town and the state of Utah. This week inman recently posted The Best US cities for A fresh Start and Salt Lake City makes the top ten. If you’ve ever had to move to another city for a job, you’ll know just how difficult relocating your life can be. But some parts of the country may be better suited for a fresh start — places like Buffalo, New York; Minneapolis; Salt Lake City; and Austin, Texas; are among some of the most receptive, a new study by online lending exchange LendingTree indicates.

To come to these findings, the study’s authors looked at eight elements that would impact a person’s launch in a new city, including the cost of housing, median income and rates of health insurance coverage at 50 of the largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. To calculate a resident’s chances of landing a good job, the study also examined the number of adults between 35 and 64 who are single, enrolled in school and covered by some form of health insurance along with additional factors including employment, median income and school enrollment.

Spring is here and now it is time to start planning your summer activities by adding the Deer Valley concert line-up to your calendar. Now in its 15 year, the festival's six-week summer schedule starts on June 30 with a Patriotic Celebration featuring vocalist Rachel Potter that will include 13 full orchestra concerts at the Snow Park Amphitheater, as well as four chamber concerts at St. Mary's Catholic Church that begins on July 11 with Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 5 featuring violinist Kathryn Eberle.

Park City Mountain is ready to slide into their 11th annual Spring Grüv, a 16-day event that features live music, family-friendly activities, entertainers and the 22nd edition of the resort's annual pond skimming contest - the fun begins March 24th.

As we work our way through the annual mud season here are 13 Easy Spring Upgrades You Can Do in A Weekend. With thoughts turning to warmer weather this seemed like a good time to round up a few little projects you can do to improve your backyard, or just add a little curb appeal to your home. Projects range from painting your front door and porch steps to organizing the garage and adding a fire pit to your patio area.

Spring In Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Mar 21, 2018

Spring is here and as the snow comes and goes the flowers are beginning to bloom in our town. Our flower today comes atop a lovely muffin from Five 5eeds in Park City on Snow Creek Drive.

There are a number of fun activities happening the remainder of this month and we have listed out a few for you and your families as wells as the links to more information on each event.

 

3/22 - 3/31: Easter Bunny Train, Heber City

3/24: Pink Park City, Park City Mountain

3/24 - 3/25: Holi Festival of Colors, Spanish Fork

3/24 - 4/2: Spring Gruv, Park City Mountain

3/30: The Comedy Get Down Tour, West Valley City

3/31: Easter Egg Hunt!, Salt Lake City

4/1: Easter at Snowbird, Snowbird

4/1: Annual Easter Celebration, Park City Mountain

4/1: Easter Bunny visits Deer Valley, Deer Valley Resort

We are proud to be a part of the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Property team for many years now. This year the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties received numerous brokerage, office, team, and individual awards at the annual network Sales Convention in San Antonio, Texas on March 5th and 6th 2018. The Utah Properties brokerage was celebrated as the 14th highest performing brokerage while Park City’s Saddleview Office the 3rd highest dollar volume office in the network and Salt Lake City’s Old Mill Office the 7th highest transaction volume for an office in the network.

“Our Berkshire Hathaway professionals are true industry leaders.” said Owner and CEO, Steve Roney. “This year’s convention and honors confirm the caliber and accomplishment of Utah Properties. I look forward to continuing to excel as a brokerage and team.”

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties is an independently owned real estate brokerage dating back to 1976. With offices throughout northern Utah, the company has a long-standing track record of market dominance and dependability. Under the Berkshire Hathaway name, our agency holds the #1 position in Utah’s real estate marketplace and maintains an historic commitment to community-driven service.

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, based in Irvine, CA, is a real estate brokerage network built for a new era in residential real estate. The network, among the few organizations entrusted to use the world-renowned Berkshire Hathaway name, brings to the real estate market a definitive mark of trust, integrity, stability and longevity. The brand was just recognized for “Highest Overall Satisfaction for Repeat Home Sellers Among National Full Service Real Estate Firms” in J.D. Power’s 2017 Home Buyer/Seller Satisfaction Study. Visit www.berkshirehathawayhs.com.

 

Sundance 2018

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jan 17, 2018

This week we wanted to share a little about Sundance, the Park City School District and the Berkshire Hathaway 2017 Year End Market Overview. Sundance is almost here with 110 Independent Films From 29 Countries. The Festival hosts screenings in Park City, Salt Lake City and at Sundance Mountain Resort, from January 18th –28th. Robert Redford, President and Founder of Sundance Institute, said, “The work of independent storytellers can challenge and possibly change culture, illuminating our world’s imperfections and possibilities. This year’s Festival is full of artfully-told stories that provoke thought, drive empathy and allow the audience to connect, in deeply personal ways, to the universal human experience.”

For the 2018 Festival, 110 feature-length films were selected, representing 29 countries and 47 first-time filmmakers, including 30 in competition.These films were selected from 13,468 submissions including 3,901 feature-length films and 8,740 short films. Of the feature film submissions, 1,799 were from the U.S. and 2,102 were international. One-hundred feature films at the Festival will be world premieres. In 2017, the Festival drew 71,638 attendees, generated $151.5 million in economic activity for the state of Utah and supported 2,778 local jobs.

Starting January 16 at 10:00 a.m. MT, individual tickets will be released for purchase online and at box offices as they become available up until 2 hours before showtime.

If you're looking for Box Office Hours, information on our eWaitlist, or other Frequently Asked Questions, CLICK HERE

News Update - FASHION magazine recently posted a lovely little article If You Ski, Add Utah’s Wasatch Mountain Range to the Bucket List - Imagine sunrise yoga in a 10,000-year-old crater, afternoon ski lessons with an Olympian and a six-course Norwegian dinner at 2,652 metres.

The Park City School District is in the News - There are nearly 100,000 elementary, middle, and high schools in the US. The best districts are coveted, and a high-caliber school system can be a key factor when a family decides to relocate to one city over another. Niche, a company that researches and compiles information on schools, provides a ranking of the best school districts in America — that is, the collective quality of all the schools in a district determined by a grade of overall experience. The ranking includes key factors such as the strength of academics, health and safety, diversity, and the quality of teachers. This year the Park City School District is #1 for the state of Utah.

The 2017 Year End Wasatch Back Market Overview is here. For the complete digital online version, click here.

Welcome To Utah

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 29, 2017

Welcome to Utah! Our stunning state is known for its world-class skiing and snowboarding resorts, spectacular red rock deserts, and as one of the nation’s best states for business. Host of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, Utah boasts a panorama of recreation and culture. From professional sports teams such as the Utah Jazz and Real Salt Lake, performance powerhouses such as the Utah Symphony, Ballet West, and Utah Opera, exceptional art galleries and concert venues, to award-winning restaurants and a lively nightlife scene… Utah showcases a limitless variety of activities and entertainment. Check out the entire Welcome to Utah video by clicking here.

Salt Lake City International Airport is Utah’s gateway to the world. Ranked as one of the nation’s best for on time departures and arrivals and one of the lowest in percentage of flights cancelled. Salt Lake City’s airport is just 15 minutes from most Salt Lake neighborhoods and 40 minutes from Park City.

In the summer, Utah has it all when it comes to hiking, golf, mountain biking, backpacking, camping, fishing, boating, river rafting, rock climbing, and more. Home to the Mighty Five® National Parks, over 40 state parks, countless lakes and reservoirs, and some of the most scenic public and private golf courses in the country, many of which are championship-designated, there is something for everyone during the summer in Utah. Park City alone boasts over 400 continuous miles of trails which span two resorts and has been awarded the highest International Mountain Biking Association’s Gold-Level Ride Center designation.

In the winter, locals and visitors alike enjoy “The Greatest Snow on Earth” at Utah’s 14 world-class ski resorts. From Park City Mountain, the largest ski and snowboard resort in the United States, to Deer Valley® Resort which has been ranked the #1 Resort by Ski Magazine 6 times, to Snowbird which features 3,240 vertical feet between the base and the summit, Utah has a resort for everyone. Whether it’s downhill skiing or cross country, snowshoeing or snowmobiling, an incredible winter adventure is just minutes away.

From the Wasatch Front cities of Ogden, Bountiful, Salt Lake, and South Jordan, to the Wasatch Back communities of Park City, Heber, and Kamas, there is a place for everyone in Utah. Live here, work here, play here. Contact your Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties professional for the current market information on our exceptional state.

The Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties Welcome to Park City guide is now available for your review, call with any questions and have a great rest of the week.

Happy Thanksgiving

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 22, 2017

Judy and I wish you and your families a Happy Thanksgiving! We are grateful for the amazing community of Park City as we have called this lovely town home for over 15 years and look forward to another holiday season. With all the wonderful snow we have been getting the snowboard is out and I will see you on the mountain - Ramon.

Thanksgiving Day is Opening Day at Park City Mountain #FIRST30 Make Every Day Count. Start your ski season with the #FIRST30 days of winter at Park City Mountain. The #FIRST30 is packed full of events, deals, giveaways and 2 major concerts. Kick off the 2017-2018 ski season here in Park City! Lifts will be turning from 9am – 4pm, but start off the day at 8am with complimentary donuts and hot chocolate, while supplies last, and the party gets rolling with DJ Velvet spinning tunes at the base of PayDay Lift.

Welcome to Sandy and Draper - What were once farming and mining communities, Sandy and Draper are located at the base of the Wasatch Mountains and boast an array of activities and community focused neighborhoods.

Sandy and Draper feature large lots, multi-story estates, mid-century modern homes, and ranch-style ramblers. Home to the Sandy Amphitheater, Draper Rodeo, South Towne Expo Center, Rio Tinto Soccer Stadium, Loveland Living Planet Aquarium, Salt Lake County Equestrian Park, over 100 miles of hiking and mountain biking, and many public golf courses, Sandy and Draper are a short distance to the best that Salt Lake City has to offer. In the winter, residences are a quick drive to ‘The Greatest Snow on Earth’ at Snowbird, Alta, Brighton, and Solitude. With sweeping views of the Wasatch Mountains, Sandy and Draper are places people want to live.

Live here, work here, play here - We can provide you with the most current market information on these exceptional areas.

Bitcoins in Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 15, 2017

Bitcoins are making a splash into the Park City real estate market as Buyers and Sellers are beginning to make use of the cryptocurrency. I am pleased to be working directly with Real Advantage Title to assist buyers with Bitcoin purchases. Having worked with Karen Kasperick for years we are pleased to partner with Russ Smith and his entire team to assist our clients and future clients in their Bitcoin transactions on real estate purchases in the Park City area. If you would like to purchase a property in Park City using Bitcoins, my team and I can make it happen - Call me with questions.

Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority or banks; managing transactions and the issuing of bitcoins is carried out collectively by the network. Bitcoin is open-source; its design is public, nobody owns or controls Bitcoin and everyone can take part. Through many of its unique properties, Bitcoin allows exciting uses that could not be covered by any previous payment system.

Read on to see The Park Records article on the most recent Bitcoin purchase in Park City by Carolyn Webber.

Russ Smith, left, and Karen Kasperick are excited at the prospect of future Bitcoin transactions after this first successful one.

When Russ Smith picked up a call and heard the words, "What do you know about Bitcoin?" he did not have a precise answer to give. About two months later, he was finalizing a deal with a client using the new currency.

Smith, state manager of the Real Advantage Title Insurance Agency in Park City, recently made one of the first real estate transactions with bitcoins in the country and likely the first in Utah. The $3.5 million transaction was also one of the largest reported real estate deals to date using bitcoins.

Bitcoin is a form of cryptocurrency created in 2009 that is tied to no banks or country. Its value is based on algorithms from computers dependent on its use in the marketplace.

"It's basically a stock that you can use via a credit card," Smith said.

While bitcoin has become popular in some corners of the internet, it is only recently being used to purchase real estate. The first recorded bitcoin purchase for real estate in the U.S. took place in California in 2014. After a few years, another deal was finalized in Texas, Smith said.

He started looking into it after receiving a phone call from Dougan Jones, executive chairman of the real estate agency Engel & Völkers. Jones had received a call from one of his listing clients telling him that he would accept bitcoin for his property in Sundance. Another seller quickly followed suit. Jones realized that he needed to find a title agency that could help with those transactions, so he called Smith.

"I asked him if he would look into it, because it is coming at us in our industry," Jones said. Jones' seller did not find a buyer with bitcoins, but the seed was planted in Smith's mind.

In the meantime, Bob Struwe, a real estate agent for High Country Properties who worked with the buyer in the recent transaction, was doing his own research on bitcoin transactions because his client wanted to use the currency for a property purchase. It turned out to be hard to convince anyone to take him seriously.

"We were running into a real problem," he said. "His ideal scenario would be if a seller would take Bitcoin, and I knew that was going to be pretty remote."

Part of the problem is that many states, including Utah, do not consider Bitcoin legal currency, so it makes deals difficult for agencies. Plus, many people do not trust the currency because of a lingering negative connotation, Smith said. The buyer did not want to be identified in this story or have the seller know because of the stigma.

"Initially, a long time ago, it was conventional wisdom that bitcoin was considered a money laundering avenue," Smith said.

Luckily, Smith knew that it was legitimate and he and Struwe began the deal.

"It was an unbelievable success," Struwe said. "For us, (Real Advantage) was amazing to work with. The first time doing anything this complicated and large, there are some problems here and there, but everyone worked together so well."

The entire transaction took only seven days.

A typical cash deal takes three weeks to 30 days, Smith said.

Part of the reason the transaction closed so quickly is because bitcoins change value just as stocks do. If the value went up or down before the deal was closed, it would have caused some hiccups.

Smith said the setup for the deal was difficult because neither the market nor the government is prepared for bitcoin. He and Karen Kasperick, senior escrew officer at Real Advantage, had to find a way to quickly convert the bitcoins so it could be put into the title agency's trust accounts as U.S. dollars.

They eventually found BitPay, the same payment service used in the Texas transaction in September.

As more transactions take place around the country, real estate firms and title agencies will find it easier to make use of bitcoins in the market, Smith said. He believes bitcoins will only grow in popularity, and Park City should be ready.

"As we see more and more of these transactions happen, people will become more comfortable with it," he said. "And that's when the constituencies will start pressuring their local government to start moving toward moving cryptocurrency mainstream."

Smith and Jones agree that making Park City ready for Bitcoin transactions would be beneficial for the tourism market, since many foreign nations are jumping on the cryptocurrency bandwagon before the U.S..

"A lot of the people that we get in Park City are from overseas," Smith said. "They're very comfortable with it. If a hotel or a lodging company or any type of tourism starts taking cryptocurrency, I think that would be huge."

Since Struwe's involvement in the deal, he has received calls from people around the world interested in purchasing properties with their bitcoins. He, Smith and Jones believe that buyers and sellers are ready, but they need to be ready as well.

"It's our obligation to know enough about it to speak intelligently and represent our client in any form of consideration," Jones said. "Since our clients are coming to us offering bitcoins and proposing to receive bitcoins, we need to come up to speed. I think it is something we have a duty to understand and educate our clients on."

Legend Achievement

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Mar 29, 2017

Gomez Team MooseWe are pleased to share that Judy and I, The Gomez Team, have been recognized by Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Annual Awards. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties received numerous brokerage, office, team and individual awards at the annual Sales Convention in Phoenix, Arizona on March 14, 2017. Utah Properties was celebrated as the 12th highest performing brokerage while the Park City Office was the 3rd highest sales office in the Network. That is quite the feat given that Park City competes with offices in big cities like New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.

Ramon GomezThe Gomez Team was honored to be presented with the "5 Year Legend" award, which is presented to only those who have been part of the Chairman's Circle award winners for 5 years straight years in a row. To receive the Chairman's Circle award you must be in the top sales division across the board nationally.

The Wife and I are proud to be a part of this great community and honored to be recognized for our efforts providing exceptional customer service to our clients - both buyers and sellers alike. We thank the Park City community and the 42,000 Realtors and 1,200+ offices in the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Network nationwide for this great honor.

Holiday Events In Utah

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Dec 14, 2016

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We love Park City and everything that this town has to offer, but we cannot forget that Utah is an amazing state! We have lived her for many years now and cannot imagine living anywhere else. When we are looking for up-to-date events in Park City we go to the Visit Park City website. When we are looking for fun things to do around Utah and especially in the Salt Lake City valley we go to the KSL website.

Exciting news around town - Deer Valley Resort is honored to announce it has garnered the distinction of United States’ Best Ski Resort by the World Ski Award’s for the fourth consecutive year. The World Ski Award’s 2016 Ski Oscars winners represent excellence in ski tourism and the leaders shaping the future of the ski industry. Read the full article for all the details - Deer Valley Resort Named Best U.S. Ski Resort by Global Organization.

Looking to explore Park City Mountain - Ski Utah tagged along with blogger Alyssa Staker and her friend Sarah Hall who guided them through some of their favorite spots on the mountain. Follow Alyssa's lead and you're sure to have a great day at Park City Mountain. And if you're not able to tackle the entire mountain in a day, don't sweat it, as the 7,300 acres can be enjoyed over a couple of days or even a week. Click on to see the video for Park City In A Day.

Before you read the upcoming Holiday Events going on all around Utah we wanted to share a little more about our great town. The Huffington Post recently wrote 7 Reasons Park City Is Officially ‘America’s Favorite Town'. Last week Travel + Leisure recently named Park City the top town in America, and now the Huffington Post has listed their favorite things about Park City. The Huffington Post tops their list with the great slopes of Park City, to the residents, our year round activities, the food and our favorite line "the best adventures here are cheap or free" referencing our amazing trail system - Hiking Park City’s trails.

Utah Holiday Events:

Now - December 31: Luminaria at Thanksgiving Point: This enchanting mile walk will transport you into a magical holiday world as you make your way through the captivating Ashton Gardens. The walk includes thousands of lights, a nativity scene, glowing lanterns, music and games for the children. Adult tickets are $20 and children (ages 3-12) are $17.

Now - January 1: Spanish Fork's Festival of Lights: The festival is a drive-through holiday light show, open nightly from 6-10 p.m. through Jan. 1 at Canyon View Park, 3300 E. Powerhouse Road. Tickets are $7 for cars and more for larger vehicles.

Now - January 2: Salem's Pond Town Christmas: The display in Salem includes lights floating on a pond in Knoll Park. Pond Town runs nightly from 5:30 to 11 p.m. Knoll Parks is located at 200 W. 300 South. The event is free for the public.

Now - December 31: Christmas in Color: Utah's biggest drive-through holiday light show is offered in Kearns and Provo. Tickets are $21.95 per vehicle.

Now - January 1: Ogden City Christmas Village: Stroll through the lighted village, visit Santa in his castle, take a ride on the Polar Express Train and enjoy live entertainment. The village will be lit every night from 5 p.m. until midnight. The event is free for the public.

Now - December 24: Heber Valley Railroad North Pole Express: The 90-minute ride features hot chocolate and cookies from Mrs. Claus. Coach class is $35 for adults, $25 for children and $5 for toddlers.

Now - December 24: Downtown Jingle Bus in Salt Lake City: Take this bus to see all the sights downtown. This holiday-themed ride will circulate between the Gateway, Temple Square, City Creek Center Gallivan Plaza and Capitol Theatre. The bus runs from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., seven days a week, free of charge, courtesy of the SLC Downtown Alliance, City Creek Center and The Gateway.

Now - December 31: Lights on Temple Square: Christmas season begins when millions of lights are turned on the day after Thanksgiving. All events on Temple Square are free and the lights will stay on until Dec. 31. No tickets necessary.

Now - December 31: Savior of the World on Temple Square: This musical production is based on scriptural events surrounding the birth of Jesus Christ. Tickets are required. Evening and matinee performances are $10 each.

Now - December 31: Draper City Park Tree of Lights : The tree lighting ceremony has already happened but stop by and enjoy thousands of lights and see the famous willow "Tree of Lights" take center stage.

Now - December 31: Utah's Tallest Christmas Tree: The Outlets at Traverse Mountain in Lehi have this year’s tallest live tree in the state of Utah. The tree is over 75 feet tall and holds more than 900 ornaments and 500 lights. The tree is lit every night.

Now - December 31: Utah State Capitol Christmas trees: The Utah State Capitol has decked its halls. Enjoy a Utah-themed Christmas tree all season, found inside the building. No tickets are necessary.

Now - December 23: Christmas Cruise at CLAS Ropes Course in Provo: See thousands of lights reflecting off the water as you enjoy a boat ride about 25 minutes long with lighted holiday scenes along the shore. Santa will also make an appearance in his canoe. Blankets and warm clothes are encouraged since the boats are uncovered. Tickets are $8 per person and kids 2 and under are free.

Now - December 31: Deck The Hall at Sandy City Hall: Visit City Hall during the month of December to see the thousands of lights outside, an old-time village and a huge Christmas tree that can be found inside.

Now - December 23: "A Christmas Carol," a musical by Hale Center Theater Orem: See the original musical retelling of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol." Tickets start at $18.

Now - December 23: A Fairly Potter Christmas Carol: This is an unauthorized parody following the success of Fairly Potter in 2013, at the Ziegfeld Theater in Ogden. Tickets are $19 online and $20 at the door.

Now - December 31: Zoo Lights at Hogle Zoo: The Zoo Lights at Hogle Zoo return for its ninth year with more than 250 animated light displays. Wear hologram glasses to walk in the 135-foot lighted tunnel. Every night features a fun family activity. Santa will also be at Macy's Santa Station until Dec. 24. Lights went on at 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 1. Admission prices are $8 for adults, $6 for children ages 3-12 and $7 for seniors.

Now - December 20: The Forgotten Carols Christmas tour: See the timeless Christmas classic during its 25th anniversary tour in Utah. Performances will be held in Ogden, Orem, Logan, Cedar City, St. George and Salt Lake City. Visit the website for exact dates and times. Tickets start at $17.50.

Now to December 26: "The Nutcracker" by Ballet West: Come see the longest-running full production in America. Evening matinee performances run throughout the month at the Capitol Theatre in Salt Lake City. Tickets start at $19.

Now to December 31: Candy Windows in South Jordan: View 10 different holiday scenes created entirely from candy pieces in shop windows along Towne Center Drive. No tickets necessary.

December 17: Breakfast with Santa at Thanksgiving Point: Enjoy breakfast with Santa, Mrs. Claus and other North Pole characters. Kids can participate in dance contests, sing-a-longs, games, crafts and cookie decorating. Tickets can be purchased in advance for a discount of $5. Tickets for adults at the door are $35 and tickets for children at the door are $30.

Now to December 23 (Monday through Saturday evenings): Experience a Christmas from the past when you go to Candlelight Christmas at This Is the Place Heritage Park. Here, your family can participate in crafts, visit a decorated pioneer home or hear from the Heritage Village Carolers. Tickets are $5 per person; no cost for children ages 2 and younger.

Now to December 24: "A Christmas Carol" by Hale Center Theatre in West Valley City: See the holiday classic's 32nd annual production. Tickets start at $18.

Now - February 27: Elk viewing and wagon rides at Hardware Ranch: Come take a horse-drawn carriage or wagon ride through the ranch to see elk during the winter season. Rides are offered Friday through Monday during the season. Tickets are $5 for adults, $3 for kids and children ages 3 and under are free.

December 17 & 24: Get tasty food, Christmas festivities, a photo booth, face painting and more at the Breakfast with Santa at Millennial Falls. Tickets are $23 for adults and $18 for children ages 2 through 11. For reservations call 801-495-3737.

December 17: Breakfast & Brunch With Santa: The whole family can eat a warm breakfast with Santa at Discovery Gateway. The brunch will also include holiday crafts and play time in the museum with Santa. Tickets can be purchased online. From 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Tickets are $30 for children and $35 for adults. Members receive a discount.

December 15: Millennial Choir and Orchestra Christmas concert: This holiday performance will be held at the Abravanel Hall in Salt Lake City. Visit arttix.com for more information. Tickets start at $14.

December 15-17: A Kurt Bestor Christmas: Bestor will perform with his band The Collective and a chamber orchestra at the Eccles Theater. Tickets start at $25.

December 18: The Oratorio Society of Utah will be performing Handel's Messiah at 7 p.m. at the Libby Gardner Concert Hall at the University of Utah. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased here.

December 20: Come support Westminster Girl Up's Art Gala on December 20th from 7-9:30 p.m. in Jewett Center for the Performing Arts. All art will be contributed by girls and women across the Salt Lake Valley. All proceeds for the event will go directly to Girl Up. The event will be formal and all art participants would receive 2 free tickets to the event. Otherwise, admission will be $5 for adults and $3 for students. For more information, login to girlup.org.

Ski Season Is Here

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Nov 30, 2016

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Park City Mountain Resort opened their slopes this past Saturday morning, Nov. 26th, to locals and vacationers and the PayDay Express and First Time lifts were up and running, with runs such as Home Run and Turtle Trail open to skiers and snowboarders. This weekend Opening Day/Celebrity Skifest at Deer Valley begin December 3, 2016 - December 4, 2016. Deer Valley will kick off its winter season with the excitement of the annual Celebrity Skifest - make sure to check it out.

Not ready to hit the slopes... Here are 10 WAYS TO SPEND A WINTER DAY OFF THE SLOPES by Visit Park City. If you haven't checked out the Visit Park City site - this is a great place for all things Park City.

1. BOWLING AT JUPITER BOWL - Fun for all ages, Jupiter Bowl has more to offer than its 16 bowling lanes.

2. TUBING AT GORGOZA PARK - Kick back and give your legs a rest as you catch a lift up and tube down one of Gorgoza Park’s seven specially-designed tubing lanes.

3. STROLL HISTORIC MAIN STREET - Park City’s Historic District, immediately surrounding beautiful Historic Main Street, offers a wide variety of entertainment and activities. From shopping at one-of-a-kind boutiques to browsing the many art galleries, and brushing up on both your mining and ski history at the Park City Museum – you’ll get a real feel for the heart of Park City. Grab lunch at one of the award-winning restaurants along Historic Main Street.

4. THE PAINT MIXER - A guided painting opportunity that requires no previous painting experience, the Paint Mixer, located on lower Historic Main Street.

5. FITNESS, WELLNESS, AND RELAXATION - For those who want a break from the slopes, but want to keep active, Park City offers a variety of fitness centers with drop-in options.

6. DOG SLEDDING - A perfect way to rest your legs, dog sledding offers unique views and access to more remote areas with stunning views, peace, and quiet in the areas surrounding Park City.

7. KIMBALL ART CENTER - Not only is Kimball Art Center’s main gallery (with rotating special exhibits) open daily and free of charge, they also offer numerous opportunities for classes and studio time.

8. SNOWMOBILING - Have the need for speed? A perfect way to experience nature in smaller groups, snowmobiling offers a unique opportunity to meander through aspen meadows and pick up a bit of speed through wide open space – it’s a fun way to spend the day as a family or with a group of friends.

9. SNOW BIKING - Utilize a different set of muscles while riding a fat-tire bike throughout Park City’s trail system.

10. UTAH OLYMPIC PARK - Brush up on your Olympic history with a guided tour of Utah Olympic Park, or a walk through the Alf Engen Ski Museum and Eccles 2002 Olympic Winter Games Museum.

Looking for something fun to do in the valley - We truly enjoy Ballet West’s Nutcracker and are lucky to be home to one of the best ballet company’s in the country. Bring joy to the holidays with the favorite that has charmed families for generations and wowed audiences throughout the nation. Take a magical journey to the land of the Sugar Plum Fairy for lively and colorful dances from around the world. Join Ballet West for the 60th production of Willam Christensen’s The Nutcracker and see why this is the longest-running full production in America. - JANET QUINNEY LAWSON CAPITOL THEATRE 50 west 200 south Salt Lake City UT 84101

Click here for the official Utah Snow Report and read on for all the anticipated opening ski dates - have a great week!

Alta : December 2

Beaver : TBD

Brian Head : OPEN

Brighton: OPEN

Cherry Peak : TBD

Deer Valley : December 3

Eagle Point : December 17

Nordic Valley : December 10

Park City Mountain : OPEN

Powder Mountain : December 1

Snowbasin : December 1

Snowbird : OPEN

Solitude : December 2

Sundance : December 9

 
 
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