Blog

Skyscrapers

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Sep 11, 2019

Last week we shared that the millennial population represents approximately 23 percent of the Utah population which makes sense that Downtown Salt Lake City is increasingly a hub for young, tech-savvy workers who live and play among the skyscrapers. The Salt Lake Tribune shares that Salt Lake City’s downtown is thriving — and changing. Young, educated and tech-smart workers are moving into condos and apartments close to their jobs and a host of new restaurants, bars and theaters across the business core.

A new study, commissioned by the Downtown Alliance, representing merchants in the heart of Salt Lake City, has documented that growth in the working-age population, comparing it to other large cities in the West. Its key finding: Utah’s downtown workforce is more tech based but also on the lower end of the national salary scale for that sector.

The availability of highly skilled workers is a leading factor — more important than office rents or other metrics — for companies deciding to locate in Salt Lake City, said Matthew Vance, senior research director and economist for CBRE, who led the research. And as Salt Lake City’s downtown continues to flourish along with Utah’s overall economy, that talent pool is giving it a competitive edge among major cities such as Denver, Portland, Seattle, Boise, Omaha and Austin. It is also pushing related growth in markets for office space, residential units, hospitality and retail outlets. “Job growth is the driving force for all things real estate,” Vance said.

Matt Baldwin, board chairman for the Downtown Alliance, said “the future for Salt Lake City’s downtown has never been brighter. The economy is growing and the skyline is rising.” Baldwin noted that five major high-rise projects would get underway in 2020, adding nearly 100 stories to the skyline between them, along with 2 million square feet of new office space and hundreds of apartments and hotel rooms.

Along with the pending renovation of the Salt Lake Temple by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he said, those projects will make next year the city’s “Year of the Construction Crane.” Commissioned by the Downtown Alliance and conducted by analysts at real estate firm CBRE, the study finds that Utah’s capital ranks high among comparable cities, many with larger populations, for the recent growth in its working-age population.

Those workers are younger — median age just above 32 — and have more technology degrees per capita than their counterparts in at least six other metropolitan areas. And at least in the technology sector, the average wages in a range of top jobs are lower here than in Seattle, Denver, Portland and Austin, CRBE found. Only similar workers in Omaha and Boise had lower average wages, at $70,349 and $66,556 yearly, respectively, compared to Salt Lake City’s average annual wage of $71,710.

This probably why Salt Lake City is also the Best City for Young Entrepreneurs. Small Biz Trends shares which cities are most popular with young entrepreneurs between the ages of 25 and 34 and Salt Lake City comes in first. The rankings reflect the percentage of young entrepreneurs to the overall population in metropolitan areas of the United States with over 50,000 people. We also identify factors such as industry clusters, lifestyle, infrastructure, costs, workforce availability and a thriving entrepreneurial community nearby.

1. Salt Lake City - Known for its booming tech industry leading to the area’s designation as part of the Silicon Slopes, Salt Lake City is a magnet in the western U.S. for young entrepreneurs. Today, 1,973 young entrepreneurs call the city home, accounting for .17% of the population. Plenty of networking and a welcoming business community are hallmarks of Salt Lake City. Entrepreneurs like Robert Brady, the Founder of Righteous Marketing says he travels from his home base in Idaho down to Salt Lake regularly to network and connect with other entrepreneurs. “They are an amazing group of people.”

2. Oklahoma City - Often called simply OKC, the city is also OK with young entrepreneurs.

3. Denver - Millennial migration to Denver is now well documented. So the presence of so many young entrepreneurs in the metro area is a no-brainer.

4. Seattle - The city that launched Kurt Cobain and the Grunge revolution is still young at heart.

5. Los Angeles - LA is home to 15,409 young entrepreneurs. That may make it sound like the city deserves a higher ranking here. But in the behemoth that Los Angeles is, that number represents only .12% of the metro population.

6. Portland - Oregon’s largest city keeps young entrepreneurs busy and when not working on their businesses, these young entrepreneurs have plenty to do in Portland’s unique culture that celebrates “weird.”

7. Tampa - The city’s major industries include finance, retail and insurance, But the local economy is also buoyed up by shipping, national defense, professional sports, tourism and real estate.

8. Minneapolis - The city trails only Chicago and Detroit as the largest economic centers in the Midwest. And it is home to such Fortune 500 companies as Target, U.S. Bancorp and Ameriprise Financial.

9. San Diego - San Diego is named for a Spanish saint but the metro area is clearly revered by young entrepreneurs as well.

10. San Jose - Located in California’s Silicon Valley, the area is already known for tech entrepreneurs. And there are many young entrepreneurs too — a total of 2,156 of them work in the metro area making up .11% of the population.

Sometimes we need to relax and here are 6 Tremendous Spa Treatments for the Athlete (and Weekend Warrior) by Park City Magazine. Recover from hard-charging, on-mountain fun with these specialty massages, salty floats, and more.

Foot Zoning

Park City Massage and Spa (formerly Silver Mountain Spa) In addition to all the classic spa treatments, Park City Massage and Spa’s robust menu offers everything from jet lag recovery to Cranial Sacral Therapy to body mapping. One unique option for athletes is Foot Zoning, done by intuitive wellness and certified foot zone therapist Wendy Wise. Using massage that taps into the nerves on your feet (which connect to corresponding areas in your body), foot zoning “improves circulation and the body’s ability to communicate with itself and detoxify,” Wise says. “We nickname it the ‘Ph.D. level of reflexology’ because people have heard of reflexology, but it’s much more than that—it’s easiest to understand once you experience it.” By focusing on your feet, Wise says she can strategically open structural space and help oxygenate the entire body. You’ll learn a lot about your immune and hormonal systems and overall health in the process, too.

Alpine Body Rescue

Spa Montage Deer Valley To alleviate muscle pain and tension from outdoor endeavors, Spa Montage Supervisor Dominic McKenzie recommends the Alpine Body Rescue, a strong-pressure massage that includes a therapeutic heat pack and aromatic blend to relieve neck and shoulder tension. For a more relaxing head-to-toe treatment, he also suggests the Seasonal Renewal, a blend of full-body exfoliation and dry brushing followed by a hot stone massage and grounding foot treatment.

Float Therapy

SYNC Float Center Athletes have long used Epsom salt baths to recover from hard workouts, and float therapy amplifies those pain-relieving benefits. During a 30- or 60-minute float, you’ll be immersed in a pod filled with water and 1,000 pounds of magnesium sulfate, which allows you to float on the surface. “There are three different therapies going on during a float,” explains SYNC co-owner Justin Hunter. “Magnesium absorbs into the skin and helps relax tension and lowers stress response, facilitates healing, and increases antioxidant production.” Also, the water allows you to spread out over the surface and elongates your muscles—great for compressive sports like mountain biking or skiing—and the sensory reduction enhances focus, clarity, and creativity. “Research has shown that an hour float is equal to four hours of sleep as far as what the body can get done,” Hunter says.

High Mountain Foot Recovery

The Spa at Hotel Park City Runners and hikers putting in high mileage should consider the High Mountain Foot Recovery, a therapeutic 25-minute massage that combines reflexology techniques with a skin hydration treatment. Hotel Park City also has a full lineup of treatments, including skin, hair, and nails, with a sauna and eucalyptus steam room to relax in afterwards.

Ninety-Nine 90 Therapeutic Leg Recovery

RockResorts Spa at The Grand Summit, Park City Mountain Named after the iconic expert lift at Park City Mountain, this leg-focused massage (50 or 80 minutes) at Canyons Village’s RockResorts Spa is useful for yes, skiers, but also anyone who uses his or her leg muscles in a big way. “The therapists focus on the legs to move out the lactic acid and they know which muscles need to get worked on the most based on what activities the athlete is doing,” says spa concierge Sally Smith. The treatment includes a cooling aromatic compress on your legs in combination with targeted compressions, stretching, and pressure-point massage to regenerate muscles and eliminate swelling.

CBD Massage Experience

Align Spa Tapping into the anxiety-reducing and pain-relieving properties of CBD, Align Spa allows you to upgrade your massage—Swedish, Reflexology, Deep Tissue, and more—with a CBD experience. Using wide spectrum raw hemp, CBD oil is incorporated into your full-body massage followed by a custom tea blended with CBD, and a take-home muscle relief or calming bath bomb.

Ski Resorts and The Tour of Utah

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 13, 2019

The Deseret News shares that a developer plans to make Utah site the first new full-service ski resort in country since 1980 - By Amy Donaldson. For nearly 40 years, no developer has managed to build and open a new, full-service ski resort, but it’s not because there wasn’t demand for one or a desire to do so.

"I know that the mountains are littered with developers who thought they were going to do something and nothing happened,” said Gary Barnett, founder and chairman of Extell Development Company, who unveiled plans Monday for a ski resort and village that includes hotels, condominiums and residential housing. ”I mean, nothing has really been done in the country in the last 30 years, since Beaver Creek, really. … It’s so hard to do.”

So what makes a guy who doesn’t even ski think he can do what no one else has managed since 1980? A unique set of circumstances and colleagues with a vision.”I think once again, one of the important things for us was the ability to tap into tax increment financing,” he said, referring to the fact that Wasatch County had designated the Mayflower Resort area as a place where Utah’s Military Industrial Development Agency could build a recreation hotel, which returns some of the property tax generated from development to developers in exchange for reduced fees for military personnel.

”The fact that MIDA is there, supporting it and helping speed up the process, was a very necessary component for me to get involved. I would not have gotten involved otherwise,” Barnett said. The project — Mayflower Mountain Resort — is ambitious in its scope, with plans for 5,600 acres that are just west of U.S. 40 and Jordanelle Reservoir (near Exit 8) and adjacent to Deer Valley that includes 1,520 residential units, 825 hotel rooms and commercial units and 600 skier parking spaces.

It will be the first recreation project created to work with the military for the state, said Kurt Krieg, vice president of development. The Military Industrial Development Agency is a state-run economic development entity with a military focus, which in this case, offers ski resort vacation opportunities to military personnel at a fraction of the cost.

Among the advantages the new resort will have is its proximity to one of the state’s top rated resorts — Deer Valley. ”We have the ability to connect to Deer Valley,” Barnett said, noting that Extell just renegotiated a lease of land to Deer Valley that makes the future more predictable for both entities. ”Obviously, they’d have to purchase a Deer Valley ticket, but there is that ability to provide skiing. We feel like the access from our side of the mountain is exceptional.”

The location of Mayflower may offer it some unique advantages that other start-ups don’t enjoy, including 35 minutes and no stop lights from the Salt Lake City International Airport to the freeway exit.

”There is no other resort of this scale, maybe around the world, that I know of that is 35 minutes from a major, international airport,” he said. “It’s going to have access to everywhere. … That’s the No. 1 thing Utah has going for it is this access. And we have straight highway, no traffic lights. … So we’ve got everything in our favor to get this thing done.” The goal is to have the village and some ski runs open within five years.

Extell has discussed climate change challenges, as they planned the development and acquired land, Barnett said. It also hopes to be supportive, if not involved in, Utah’s bid for another Winter Olympics in 2030 or 2034. “We love the idea, and we’d love to be involved in it,” he said. “Anything we do would have to be coordinated with Deer Valley and the state of Utah, but we certainly love the idea of playing a very active role. We hope we get it in 2030.”

Some of what Barnett and his team envision is similar to what’s out there. Some of it is unique. But before they can begin to build anything, they are conducting a voluntary cleanup of the mountain, because the last mining companies left in 1969 without the resources to clean up any contamination. The land has been vacant, even as development occurred around it, in part because of the contamination and in part because it was owned by a foreign trust with a trustee who sought a higher price than anyone was willing to pay.

As the trustees re-negotiated representation, the land became available and then it was a matter of cleaning up the contamination in order to develop it in the ways Extell envisions. On Monday, several members of the Extell team and the Military Industrial Development Agency representatives took media on a tour of the picturesque site, pointing out where ski lifts might be, where water tanks will be installed and how cleanup will work.

In some places, as much as 18 inches of soil is being removed and it will be taken to a central location and capped, as is standard in these types of cases, according to Krieg, who led the tour. While no other full service resort has opened in the U.S. since 1980, about a half dozen terrain parks or ski resorts without on-site lodging have opened, including Cherry Peak, which is 20 minutes outside Logan, and two hours north of Salt Lake City. But nothing like most of Utah’s resorts — and nothing like what Extell has planned for Mayflower Resort.

”We have the makings of a really beautiful resort town,” he said. “And that’s what we’re looking at doing.”

The Tour of Utah is once again scheduled to pedal two of its six legs through Summit County and finish on Main Street in Park City. This year’s race covers 477 miles around northern Utah as racers compete in 13 King of the Mountain climbs up an estimated 37,882 feet, and through another 15 sprint competitions. The main events for Summit County spectators are scheduled to take place on Saturday, Aug. 17, the fifth leg of the race, and Sunday, Aug. 18, the sixth and final stage.

The fifth stage of the race begins at 2:30 p.m. and will loop from the Canyons Village at Park City mountain around the Jordanelle and Rockport reservoirs before heading back to the resort. There will be sprint lines in Kamas and Hoytsville, bracketed by King of the Mountain challenges back up to the Jordanelle and through Browns Canyon.

In the day’s final miles, racers will ride through Kimball Junction up to the Utah Olympic Park and will cut down Bear Hollow drive before a final push along Canyons Resort Drive and High Mountain Road to the finish near the Umbrella Bar in Canyons Village. Frontrunners are expected to finish around 6 p.m. A free concert with Florida-based jazz trio Honey Hounds is set to take place after the awards ceremony at 6:30 p.m.

The route, first introduced in 2012, covers 78.2 miles with 10,000 feet of climbing. Racers will leave from Main Street at approximately 12:30 p.m. and head out of the city to Brown’s Canyon with another sprint line in Kamas before zig-zagging into a 2.1-mile KOM climb through Wolf Creek Ranch. The riders will descend into Wasatch County down to Heber, entering the race’s final sprint section in Midway before the grueling six-mile climb along Pine Canyon Road up to Empire Pass. After topping out, racers will ride the switchbacking descent down Marsac Avenue and race up Main Street to the finish line.

“We’re excited to have the Tour of Utah returning to Main Street,” said mayor Andy Beerman via email. “Main Street is an iconic finish to a race that not only highlights amazing athletes, but also Utah’s most spectacular landscapes.” For more information go to TourofUtah.com.

It’s official: Deer Valley is hosting another freestyle World Cup this winter. The U.S. Ski and Snowboard sent out a press release confirming the FIS winter schedule, including the Intermountain Healthcare Freestyle International, on Feb. 6-8. The Freestyle International will include moguls, aerials and dual moguls competitions, with a viewing area at the top of Deer Valley’s Burns and Snowflake lifts above Snow Park Lodge. This year will be the 20th that Deer Valley has hosted the event, which has become a favorite of athletes and spectators.

“Deer Valley is honored to have been selected as a venue for another freestyle skiing World Cup and to be able to continue our long tradition of hosting these international competitions,” said Emily Summers, a spokeswoman for Deer Valley in an email. “We are looking forward to welcoming the mogul and aerial teams back to Deer Valley in 2020.”

The resort was the host site for the 2019 World Championships and has a storied past in freestyle skiing. It was where Jonny Moseley performed the Dinner Roll during the 2002 Olympics, spurring a rules change to allow inversions, and where Mikael Kingsbury became the winningest moguls skier in history last year.

The event is particularly pertinent to the U.S. freestyle teams, which are based out of Park City and consider the venue their home turf. At the World Championships in February, Americans Brad Wilson and Jaelin Kauf both medaled in dual moguls.

The U.S. Alpine team will host the HomeLight Killington Cup on Nov. 30 through Dec. 1 in Vermont. That event is followed on the Alpine calendar by Birds of Prey at Beaver Creek in Colorado on Dec. 6 through 8.

In cross-country skiing, the Fastenal Parallel 45 Winter Festival in Minneapolis will be held over four days in March, including a music festival, panel discussions and the first cross-country World Cup to come to the U.S. in 19 years. The longstanding drought was broken thanks to the U.S. team’s performance at the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Games, where Jessie Diggins and Kikkan Randall took home the nation’s first-ever gold.

The World Cup cross-country freestyle sprint event will be held on March 17, and will act as the second leg of a mini sprint tour that begins in Quebec City the weekend before.

The freeskiing and snowboarding World Cup halfpipe season is scheduled to begin at Copper Mountain on Dec. 11-14.

On Jan. 29 to Feb. 1, skiers and boarders will compete in slopestyle and halfpipe at Mammoth Mountain in California. One more major freeski and snowboarding event will be added to the U.S. calendar in the coming weeks, the press release stated.

“Fans of ski and snowboard sports have a lot to look forward to in the coming season, especially here in the U.S.,” said U.S. Ski and Snowboard President and CEO Tiger Shaw in the press release. “We have the cross-country World Cup coming back to America for the first time in nearly 20 years with the event in Minneapolis in March. That is going to be an awesome event, giving Jessie Diggins, Sophie Caldwell, Sadie Bjornsen and their teammates (including Park City’s Rosie Brennan) the opportunity to race at World Cup level on home soil for the first time in their careers, in front of thousands of people.”

Market Reports:

Reasons to Hire a Real Estate Agent

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 10, 2019

Since 2006 my wife and I have had the great pleasure of being a part of the real estate community. We represent buyers and sellers in the Greater Park City area as well as in Salt Lake City. This week we wanted to share the Top 6 Reasons to Hire a Real Estate Agent to Sell Your Home - As a homeowner, there's only so much you can do when trying to sell your home. When it comes to real estate, hiring a professional agent is more of a need than an option. A real estate agent's greatest goal is to sell your house at a higher price in a lesser number of days.

While it's possible to sell a home without representation, it's important to remember that real estate is also a legal matter. In fact, there has been a massive increase in scammers targeting real estate clients because they're fully aware that some people don't seek agent representation. If you decide to sell your house, understand that it's a heavy process with many stakes involved. Here are some reasons why hiring a real estate agent is crucial:

Years of Experience - Nothing can beat experience. As a homeowner, you might believe in relying on the internet, family or friends; however, the experience of a professional real estate agent is what will truly help you secure a worthy investment. With years of experience in cracking the real estate code, agents know the times of the year when house prices go up and when potential buyers are most active. Hiring an agent will save you the stress of learning everything about buying and selling a house.

Negotiation Skills - Experience also endows real estate agents with impressive negotiation skills. Dealing with buyers, brokers and legal representatives on a daily basis, real estate professionals know exactly what each stakeholder wants. Agents have the skills to negotiate prices well and secure a worthy investment. You'll never be disappointed after hiring a competent agent because they'll provide the best representation for your property.

Access to a Critical Database - Real estate agents have deep connections and access to crucial real estate databases. The Multiple Listing Service (MLS) is an interface of all the current homes for sale. When you hire an agent, all the information required to sell your house will be available over the MLS for other agents. Your agent can effectively advertise your property by featuring an attractive package. With instant visibility, there are far more chances of selling your house quicker than when you may have tried it on your own. With greater access to buyers, you can sell your house fast instead of waiting and lowering the price. Hiring an agent may seem costly at first, but it can give you the upper hand in steering the price of your house.

Network of Professionals - Agents can never give their best service in isolation. With experience and education, they will always have a pool of professionals that they stay in touch with for speedy selling, buying and referrals. Agents work with many other people who can directly impact the price of your property.

Knowledge of Market Conditions - Real estate professionals have to stay updated with the rising house prices, and the best times to invest in the real estate market. They have insights into the market conditions that'll eventually dictate the price at which you sell your house. There are many calculations involved when it comes to learning the real estate climate. Data like the average-per-square foot cost, average house sale prices, list-to-sold prices and how long a house stays on the market are all things that ultimately decide how fast your house sells. Learning about this can be a hefty task, especially when you have to take care of the investment and insurance. Instead of taking all the stress yourself, hire an agent to guide you accordingly. You'll save both time and money.

Confidentiality and Security - As mentioned, with scammers on the rise, it only makes sense to hire a professional who will keep all your information confidential until the deal closes. With your identity papers, bank statements and mortgages at stake, hiring an agent is critical. Sometimes, even the smoothest transactions can have issues like tax assessments and missing stamps. Missing even a single step of selling your house can come back to haunt you. Enjoy the peace of mind that follows placing your property in safe hands.

Buying and selling a house is no joke—it's a lifetime investment. While these are only a handful of reasons eliciting the importance of a real estate agent, hiring one will save you from the trouble of paperwork, taxing complications, and, most of all, fraudulent schemes.

With the beautiful weather in Park City, it is time to be outside and if you’re lucky enough to have outdoor space (even if it’s just a sliver of grass) you’ll want to make the most of it. But knowing where to start can be tricky. Here are 7 Design Ideas to Make the Most of Your Backyard:

Swinging Seat - If you have the space, consider creating a variety of seating options — the neutral color palette ties together each of these. Warning: Hanging a hammock or swinging chair means that guests will be rushing over to your place whenever they get the chance. Kids and adults alike will love kicking back with a good book and a refreshing glass of lemonade all summer long. And when in doubt: add string lights.

Family Friendly Features - This backyard allows for plenty of space to play. But despite all of the kid-friendly equipment, it still manages to look stylish. Hang a macramé piece under a covered area for a boho touch, and set out some mod chairs to keep the look current.

Comfy and Cool - How stunning is this covered patio space? The homeowners with the backyard featured in the previous photo also did an excellent job styling this seating area. We love the addition of string bulb lights (again, a backyard essential) and the fun and funky egg chair. Pillows and a throw blanket add texture and necessary warmth for chillier nights.

Festive Fire Pit - Gather round! Group your chairs around a fire pit and set out poufs for extra seating if the weather permits. You’ll have the ideal space to spend many a summer evening talking and laughing with friends and neighbors—and indulging in a s’more or two.

Poolside Perch - Lucky enough to have a pool? Add a comfy outdoor couch and chairs, and you’ll never want to leave the yard. Adults can supervise little ones while kicking back and relaxing in the shade.

Patterned Patio - Having guests over? Jazz up patio furniture with the addition of colorful throws and patterned pillows to bring a well-traveled look to your backyard space. Pattern-mixing newbie? Stick to one color palette (here: pinks, blues, browns, and whites), to tie everything together.

Kids Only - Create a special oasis for the kids by setting up an outdoor dining space that’s just their size. Giant buckets make for great toy storage (which means easy access while the adults are still eating).

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Architecture And Design

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 26, 2019

When you think about architecture, you might imagine the timeless columns of a Grecian revival or the clean lines of a mid-century modern home. But for every classic architecture style, there are a few that didn’t quite weather the test of time. It’s why you can sometimes tell exactly when a home was built based on its architectural style alone (looking at you, 1990s ranch). The trick to transitioning from trend to style staple is choosing one or two of the elements from the style you love for your home. Resist the urge to pile all of the trends into one space. Instead, check out some of our favorite 2019 architecture trends to see which features you’d choose. These are the 2019 Architecture Trends by freshome.

Hidden tech - Smart homes are nothing new in the world of tech and design, but architects are learning to be sneakier about it. Today, technology exists as part of the home’s design instead of being its main feature. Building smart outlets or speakers directly into the home means you get all the tech you love without tripping over wires. It’s also important that tech is seen as a seamless part of life, rather than an add-on. Expect to see even more solutions to keep tech hidden, yet totally functional.

Flex design -No two families are exactly alike, so why are so many floorplans the same? The idea of flexible design is one of those 2019 architecture trends we can really get behind. After all, it just makes sense that designers would start to see that different families have different ways of doing things. The result is a flexible approach to design that leaves the details up to the homeowners. Creating rooms that pull double duty (a combination guest room and office, anyone?) or getting rid of formal, less-used spaces (bye, formal dining room!) means architects can create homes where every inch is optimized for each family.

Sustainability - Designing for sustainability isn’t anything new on the architecture scene, but the solutions architects are using are so 2019. Sustainability isn’t just about using energy-rated appliances and a few solar panels, but really considering the impact building has on the environment. With that in mind, more designers are turning to locally sourced, sustainable building materials to get started. Sustainability is being built right into the walls with more efficient fixtures and even indoor green spaces. You might not even know that your architect is a stickler for sustainability because great designers simply make it a seamless part of your build.

Smaller scale - Just a decade ago, size really mattered most when designing a home. It was all about how much square footage you could get, which is why the real estate market is packed with 1990 and early 2000 “McMansions.” These are usually homes that, while large, are often cheaply finished or cursed with small lots. It’s interesting to note that one of the most common 2019 architecture trends is choosing to build smaller. It’s not always a question of budget; homeowners are simply choosing to create smaller footprints. Not only does this leave more outdoor space, but it means easier upkeep and less maintenance. It also allows homeowners to invest in good-quality finishes and furnishings so their smaller home stands the test of time.

Segmented spaces - We all know that the open concept home has been the gold standard for the last 10 years. After decades of small, specific rooms, American families are choosing spaces that allow more room and fewer labels. But while open concept offers the most room to roam, it still has a few issues. There can be such a thing as too much openness in a home, so architects have had to learn to create defined spaces without using walls. Segmented spaces, which use architectural features like sunken rooms, varying ceiling heights and other features help to divvy up the space while keeping it open.

Outdoor living - The backyard isn’t an afterthought anymore. More architects are taking the time to design the outdoor living space as much as the indoor. Whether it’s space for a backyard barbecue, a sunny pool oasis or even just a kid’s paradise, expect to see more outdoor design in 2019. As architects consider the way families live and use their homes, it’s more apparent that outside is just as important as inside. Design a smart outdoor space and you’ll increase your home’s size without increasing square footage. What’s more, planning for outdoor space as part of the design and build means more efficient budgeting.

Modern farmhouse - For the last couple of years, the farmhouse has reigned supreme as the top trend. Homeowners love the comfortable warmth and architectural interest farmhouse design brings to the table. But there were a few drawbacks, including the risk of becoming cluttered and kitschy. That’s why we’re not surprised to see modern farmhouse take over the list of 2019 architecture trends. It takes what everyone loves about farmhouse design (warmth, character) but uses clean lines and architecture to ensure it doesn’t become clunky and cluttered. It’s a perfect marriage of two design styles to create something as functional as it is beautiful — and we’re here for it.

Using every possible trend in your home is what could push your design out of the “timeless” category. Instead, choose two or three trends that you’d like your architect to incorporate and then allow him or her to work magic on your design. When done well, your 2019 home can stand the test of time and always look totally on trend.

Design also flows into your outside spaces and in Designing Your Outdoor Living Space This Summer: 4 Hot Trends - From bohemian cues to minimalistic touches, the decor in our homes is migrating outdoors for the summer—and balance, in both colors and materials, is the overarching theme, according to a new report by Zillow. "The lines have been blurred between what's indoor-only and what you can use outside, which means it's never been easier to create an outdoor space that's cohesive with your indoor design," says Kerrie Kelly, design expert at Zillow.

The Hottest Outdoor Trends - Comforts of Indoors, Out. Most of us delineate our indoor living spaces in a structured way, from arranging anchor furniture and hanging lighting to rolling out rugs. According to the Zillow report, this approach is appropriate for outside, as well, in accents like chandeliers and cushions in durable materials, centered around a fireplace or fire pit—ideal for interaction, movement and warmth.

Bright, Saturated Shades - Beyond the comforts of the indoors, citrusy colors are a top trend, with the beginning of the rainbow specifically in vogue. From corals and scarlets to tangerines, these bright hues liven up outdoor spaces, as well as coordinate with less peppy shades, making them simple to swap.

Scandinavian Touches - Classified by minimalism and a monochromatic palette, Nordic/Scandinavian design is also heading outdoors—think aluminum furnishings and neutral textiles. The aesthetic beautifully pairs with wood, according to the design experts at Zillow, complementing a deck or porch well.

Green as a Statement - Eco-friendliness is having its moment, the report shows. To add "green" to your outdoor space, consider installing LED lighting powered by solar, or a dramatic living wall, which won't detract from the natural surroundings.

Looking to get outside this weekend, here are some of the festivals and events happening this weekend — Summer is in full swing, and with the end of the school year come longer days and seemingly endless activities with which to fill them. Get out of the house and have some fun with these festivals and events happening in June throughout the Beehive State.

June 27–29: Taylorsville Dayzz

Taylorsville Dayzz will be held at Valley Regional Park, 5100 S. 2700 West, and will include live entertainment, a parade, a car show, carnival rides, a "Ralph Breaks the Internet" screening, fireworks and more. Most activities are free.

June 29: LOVELOUD

Kesha will headline the third LOVELOUD festival, the brainchild of Imagine Dragons frontman Dan Reynolds. Other performers include Tegan & Sara, Martin Garrix, K. Flay and more. The event will be held at Usana Amphitheater, 5150 Upper Ridge Rd in West Valley City. Tickets for the festival, which begins at 2:30 p.m., start at $29 and can be purchased here. Proceeds benefit local and national LGBTQ+ charities.

Utah Valley

June 22–30: Lehi Round-Up Week

Enjoy events like a picnic in the park, art shows, a barbecue, miniature float parade and more at Lehi’s Round-Up Week, culminating in a weekend rodeo. Locations and pricing vary by event; find more info here.

Northern Utah

June 28–Aug. 10: Deer Valley Music Festival

The Deer Valley Music Festival is the summer home of the Utah Symphony. This year’s festival kicks off with Chris Botti and the Utah Symphony on June 28 at the Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Dr. in Park City. Tickets start at $15.

Southern Utah

June 26–29: Bryce Canyon Annual Astronomy Festival

The 18th annual festival will have telescopes available and feature various astronomy-themed activities and programs. Keynote speaker will be Dr. Amber Straughn, associate director of astrophysics science at NASA.

June 27–Oct. 12: Utah Shakespeare Festival

The Utah Shakespeare Festival returns to Cedar City starting June 27, with "Macbeth" and "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" as its opening-night performances. Ticket prices, venues and plays vary; find a full schedule here.

June 28–30: Panguitch Valley Balloon Rally & 5K

Watch dozens of balloons rise into the sky in the morning, then head to historic Main Street on Saturday evening for the balloon glow. A 5K race will take place on Saturday morning as the balloons take off.

Entrepreneurial Spirit

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 29, 2019

For those people with an entrepreneurial spirit, Utah's capital city is one of the best places in the country to try your luck at being your own boss, new reports say from KSL. A report by FitSmallBusiness.com ranked Salt Lake City No. 6 among the top 10 cities for entrepreneurs in 2019. The study looked at business survival rate, economic growth rate, new business growth, the local financial landscape, area tax climate, the labor market, quality of life and cost of living, explained special project editor Jeff Steen.

"There are a lot of factors, but at the ground level it's about opportunity," he said. "Part of that is an existing infrastructure that supports startup culture." He said in the top-ranked cities, accessibility to investment capital is better than in many other locales compared to the overall population and startup density in those markets.

"Based on those factors, is it possible for startups to secure the funding they need to get off the ground?" he said. "Additionally, the best cities are places that offer resources to entrepreneurs that help them in their quest to get their companies up and running, including mentorship."

The entrepreneurial spirit is strong even in the donut world as The Park Record has shared where to get the best donut in Utah. Votes are in and we agree: Utah’s best donut is sold out of a Kamas gas station! The team of bakers at Mirror Lake Station used to think they made the best doughnuts in the state. Now, they have a plaque to prove it as they were awarded Utah’s Best Donut Award during the Utah Dough Show, a convention for donut-lovers that took place for the first time this year, in Salt Lake City. The station’s raspberry fritter beat out doughnuts from 22 other bakeries from around the state.

The Mirror Lake Station doughnuts have been a Kamas favorite since the station started serving the sweet pastries 40 years ago. Bakers make all of the doughnuts from scratch in a bakery behind the station. On average, 400 doughnuts a day with most of the doughnut recipes having remained the same over the last 40 years. The bakery also makes cookies, bagels, turnovers and croissants. Clara Sargent, the bakery manager, has led the bakery for 15 years. She said she wants to switch things up a little, but she intends to keep the crowd favorites on the shelves for the next 40 years.

We will wrap up this week's blog with the most recent market reports.

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Spring Investments

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 15, 2019

Spring is here and summer is on the way and it’s time to get back in the saddle again. Park City Magazine shares Back in the Saddle Again - Take to the trails with early-season mountain biking tips from a pro. Former mountain bike pro, PMBIA certified instructor, and owner of MTB-focused business Women in the Mountains, Erica Tingey shares tips on how to seamlessly get back into fitness after a long winter.

Start slow. Give yourself some space and expect that you’re going to be slow on your first ride out—and that’s OK, Tingey says. “Find a trail that’s not challenging for your first ride back,” she recommends. “I start in Round Valley because there are not any long, sustained climbs.” She also recommends riding the RTS Loop Trail near the Utah Olympic Park, so you can do a few laps. “Find a loop and ride it a few times to feel yourself improving, and to feel your blood vessels and muscles opening up.”

Re-train your vision. Without even realizing it, when you’re in mountain bike shape, your eyes naturally look far ahead to anticipate the terrain and any obstacles. Over the winter, it’s easy to lose that skill, Tingey says. “When you’re getting back into riding, try to look ahead a little bit more than you naturally would. It takes self-control to do this, and to anticipate what’s coming up. The tendency is to look down—force your eyes up.”

Loosen up.“No matter what you’ve been doing over the winter, riding always feels different,” Tingey says. “Your hands might get that itchy feeling from bouncing. And when you’re nervous or tired, you tend to grip too tight, and it’s really hard on your upper body. See if you can loosen up on the climbs and the descents.”

Start with an athletic stance. When you get tired—which can happen quickly during the early season—your posture is one of the first things to decline. Start the year with good habits and think about holding an athletic stance with your core tight, your spine strong, and your neck up. “It might be hard to hold a good posture for all three laps,” Tingey says, “but it’s a good clue to know that when you can’t hold a very good posture, you should call it a day. If you’re not riding in a strong position, you’re setting yourself up for more accidents.”

Turn your fear into excitement. If you’re a bit more skittish on technical sections than you were last year, try to put your nerves to good use. “When I was racing, instead of saying ‘I’m not nervous,’ I’d say, ‘I’m excited to be on my bike,’” Tingey says. “Turn it into positive self-talk. As in ‘I’m OK to get off my bike and walk it.’” She also notes that there’s a difference between trying and doing. “Think Yoda: There is no try.”

Just get on a saddle. If the trails are still too muddy, grab your road bike and to get used to being back in the saddle. “Using your road bike is a way to get some miles in and get used to being back in that position,” Tingey says.

Don’t forget a maintenance check. Whether it’s you or your trusty mechanic, do a thorough check of your bike before hopping on. Check the bolts with torque wrench, clean and lube the drivetrain, and test the front suspension (Tingey says to put a hand on each brake, engage, and stand behind the bike and shock it down—does it feel like it’s going up and down at the same rate as last year?). And, of course, put air in your tires, but maybe a little less than you think. “This year, try three psi less than you ever have and just see if you can get away with it,” advises Tingey.

A reminder: Wait until the trails are dry. “Riding muddy trails ruins it for everyone else for the rest of the season,” Tingey says. “It leaves ruts that aren’t magically fixed from a summer of riding. They are stuck for the rest of the year. You’re really ruining it for yourself and it’s also really hard on your bike.”

Where to find trail updates: Check the Mountain Trails Foundation’s website and Facebook page for the latest trail conditions; Basin Recreation also frequently updates the status on its Instagram and Facebook pages.

Forbes has shared The Best Cities In Utah To Own Investment Property - Based on the Census Bureau’s annual estimates of resident population, from July 2010 to July 2018, Utah’s state population increased by 13.9%, second only to the District of Columbia, and No. 1 out of all 50 states in terms of growth. Utah is an interesting state when it comes to buying and owning investment property. People and businesses have been flocking to the state, and many of its major cities have seen swelling numbers of renters. Major universities, healthcare companies and financial firms like Ally Bank can be found in Utah’s main cities, all of which help boost the economy, and increase the number of residents and appeal of the city to potential investment property owners.

1. Logan, Utah - With 61% of its occupied housing filled by renters, Logan is a fast-growing city whose population is expected to double by 2050. A key feature that makes Logan conducive to investment property owners is the presence of Utah State University, with a student population of nearly 28,000, many of which are renters or looking to rent in off-campus residences. In addition to them, professors, university staff and employees, as well as employees of businesses closely associated with the university, add to a large supply of renters and potential renters in the city. Logan also has the highest gross rental yield of major cities in Utah, i.e. cities with more than 10,000 total occupied housing units.

  • Percentage of renter households: 61%
  • Number of renter households: 10,039
  • Median property price: $235,000
  • Median rent: $1,588
  • Annual rental income: $19,056
  • Gross rental yield: 8.1%
2. Ogden, Utah - Located north of Salt Lake City, about a 30-to-40-minute drive up Interstate 15, Ogden is another great place for potential investment property owners. Property prices are affordable in terms of buy-in, and rents are comparatively high enough to produce a gross rental yield of 6.3%, behind only Logan’s 8.1%.Like Logan, Ogden is a college town, home to Weber State University, which has an undergraduate population of 27,111, according to U.S. News and World Report. The university’s students and staff provide a large pool of potential renters of your investment property in Ogden. In fact, according to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, Weber State University is the No. 4 largest employer in Ogden, behind the Department of Treasury, Weber County School District, McKay-Dee Hospital Center, and ahead of Autoliv, the world’s largest automotive safety supplier, according to their website.
  • Percentage of renter households: 44.6%
  • Number of renter households: 13,442
  • Median property price: $229,900
  • Median rent: $1,207
  • Annual rental income: $14,484
  • Gross rental yield: 6.3%
3. Midvale, Utah - A majority of occupied homes in Midvale are renters, which bodes well for rental property owners. According to Census data from the 2017 American Community Survey, the number of renter-occupied housing units has risen by over 29% from 2010 to 2017. Compare that to the U.S. overall, which has seen an increase of 12.7% over the same period of time. Several major companies have operations in Midvale, with some of the largest employers including Overstock.com, the staffing agency TEKsystems and the financial company SoFi, according to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for 2018.
  • Percentage of renter households: 58.5%
  • Number of renter households: 7,293
  • Median property price: $308,900
  • Median rent: $1,503
  • Annual rental income: $18,036
  • Gross rental yield: 5.8%
4. South Salt Lake - South of Interstate 80, and bisected by the north-south Interstate 15, South Salt Lake is cheaper than Salt Lake City proper, and has a better gross rental yield than the latter city. This is because the median property price is less than $300,000 — whereas in Salt Lake City, it’s $425,000 — while the median rent is still high enough to yield solid rental income over the course of the year. According to South Salt Lake’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for 2018, the biggest private employer is Marriott Vacations Worldwide, a leading timeshare company and publicly traded, which was originally a division of Marriott International before being spun off into its own firm.
  • Percentage of renter households: 58.6%
  • Number of renter households: 5,185
  • Median property price: $291,900
  • Median rent: $1,394
  • Annual rental income: $16,728
  • Gross rental yield: 5.7%
5. Orem, Utah - Orem is an interesting case for potential investment property owners looking to get into the Utah market. According to Census data, from 2017 to 2017, the number of renters increased by 16.4%, while at the same time, the number of owner-occupied homes actually declined: From 17,013 in 2010 to 16,200 in 2017. Like other Utah cities on this list, Orem benefits from being home to Utah Valley University. This public university has an undergraduate population of close to 37,000, according to U.S. News. Besides this vast pool of potential student renters, Utah Valley University is the largest employer in Orem, according to the city’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.
  • Percentage of renter households: 41.1%
  • Number of renter households: 11,318
  • Median property price: $315,038
  • Median rent: $1,449
  • Annual rental income: $17,388
  • Gross rental yield: 5.5%
6. Provo, Utah - Along with Orem, Provo comprises the Provo-Orem metropolitan area, which has a combined population of 617,678, according to Data USA. The Provo metro area boasts an impressively low unemployment rate of 2.8% in Feb. 2019, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In fact, from Feb. 2014 to Feb. 2019, unemployment in the Provo metro are has averaged 3.1%. Over that same period, the national unemployment rate averaged 4.8%. For investment property buyers, Provo benefits from a high percentage of renters, due no doubt in part because it’s home to Brigham Young University, one of the largest private universities in the country.
  • Percentage of renter households: 59.2%
  • Number of renter households: 19,475
  • Median property price: $309,000
  • Median rent: $1,334
  • Annual rental income: $16,008
  • Gross rental yield: 5.1%
7. Salt Lake City, Utah - The population of Utah’s capital has grown from 184,488 in 2010, to 194,188 by 2017. That’s a little over a 5% increase, and similar to the increase in renter-occupied housing units over the same period: 5%, from 37,735 to 39,626. This trend, along with the majority of the city’s residents being renters, bodes well for potential investment property owners in Utah.
  • Percentage of renter households: 51.5%
  • Number of renter households: 39,626
  • Median property price: $425,000
  • Median rent: $1,598
  • Annual rental income: $19,176
After scrambling for venues last year, the Park City Institute announced its St. Regis Big Stars, Bright Nights Summer Concert Series will continue this year in The Eccles Center for the Performing Arts. Park City Institute Executive Director Teri Orr announced the new location during an unveiling of the series at the Kimball Art Center.According to an Institute press release, the series is as follows: 

 — The Brothers Osborne, July 7. The Grammy Award-nominated duo features T.J. and John Osborne, who have climbed the country charts with the hits “Stay a Little Longer” and “Rum,” while collecting CMA and ACM awards along the way.

 — The Punch Brothers, July 30. The quintet of mandolinist Chris Thile, guitarist Chris Eldridge, bassist Paul Kowert, banjoist Noam Pikelny and violinist Gabe Witcher formed in 2006. The band’s latest album, “All Ashore,” won the 2019 Grammy for Folk Album of the year. Thile is known for his work in Nickel Creek, and is also the host of the weekly NPR broadcast “Live From Here.”

 — Taj Mahal Quartet, and Marc Cohn featuring special guest vocalists, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Aug. 13. Taj Mahal is a two-time Grammy-winning singer, songwriter, film composer, guitarist and multi-instrumentalist who has collaborated with artists such as Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan and Wynton Marsalis.

Cohn, mostly known for the hit “Walking in Memphis,” has performed for Park City Institute three times and as a songwriter has been praised by Time Magazine as “one of the honest, emotional voices we need in this decade.”

The multiple Grammy-winning Blind Boys of Alabama formed in 1939 at the Alabama Institute for the Negro Blind and have since performed for three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

 — Gone West, Aug. 16. This pop-infused country group features Colbie Caillat, her fiance Justin Young, Caillat’s longtime collaborator Jason Reeves, and Reeves’ wife, Nelly Joy. The band formed, in part, as a result of their experience working together on Caillat’s 2016 tour. The Park City Institute presented Caillat at the Eccles Center in a sold-out performance during that tour.

 — CAM, Aug. 24. Country singer CAM began her career as a songwriter for artists including Sam Smith and Miley Cyrus. Her 2015 Grammy-nominated song “Burning House” hit No. 2 on the U.S. and Canadian country charts, and sold more than 2 million copies. A vocal advocate for music education and inclusion, CAM holds a degree in psychology from University of California Davis, sits on the board of the Academy of Country Music and joined the Recording Academy’s Task Force on Diversity and Inclusion in 2018.

Spring Is Here

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 01, 2019

The snow may be back this morning in Park City, but here are some Tips for Reviving Your Lawn After Winter. Early spring is one of the best times of the year to make your home look great. This busy season coincides with an uptick in activity in the real estate market, making it that much more critical for you to get your lawn back in great shape.

Feed It Well - Spring is the most critical time to give your lawn a boost. Winter drags on in many areas of the country, which can deplete a yard come spring. If you find yourself in this situation, try applying a quick-release fertilizer to prepare your lawn for spring. This fertilizer will get to the roots and green up your yard in a few days. However, be cautious when applying a quick-release fertilizer, as putting too much in one spot can kill your grass.Other fertilizer options include slow-release fertilizers that'll feed your lawn over time. This kind of fertilizer usually comes in granules or pellets that sit on top of your soil. They dissolve over time and provide the best long-lasting energy option for lawns.

Water in the Morning - Fertilizer applications need moisture to work best. Watering your lawn in the spring may seem counterintuitive given the rainfall that some climates receive, but watering your lawn regularly is essential to help the grass grow strong. Consider watering your yard in the morning before 10 a.m., as this will allow the lawn time to soak up the water and dry out under the afternoon sun. Watering in the evening or at night may seem smart, but it can actually cause lawn care problems such as disease and fungi.

Ease Into Mowing - While your lawn may have grown a little throughout the winter depending on your location, lawns need some time to ease into the spring. Refrain from mowing your lawn on a low setting as temperatures go up. Short lawns expose the root system, which can create a stressful situation for the grass. Consider doing a light mow early on in the season to take off the tips of the blades. Doing so will ease your lawn back into the growing season and will help keep it looking great.

Start Fighting Weeds - Homeowners looking to put their home on the market should combat any weeds in their lawn. There are many weed and feed chemicals to help prevent weeds. These mixes often include different fertilizers, so be sure to read the directions so that you don't give your lawn too much. Locate any problem areas in your yard and consider applying weed control to those areas, as well.

Seed Thin Spots - It's common for bare spots to appear after a long winter. Immediately care for areas of the lawn that have thinned or are completely bare. These spots can cause problems, not only with weed growth, but also in presenting a beautiful lawn to a prospective buyer. Rake out these spots in your yard and apply a good amount of seed. Give these spots extra water a few weeks after you seed them to encourage new grass roots to take hold.

There are many ways to help your lawn come back after a long winter. Mow the grass on a high setting until it has had time to recover, fertilize and water the lawn to boost growth, and be sure to keep weeds away by using preventive measures. Follow all the tips listed above and your lawn will be back to its former glory in no time.

When you are not working on your yard, here are some Fun early spring activity recommendations in the Salt Lake area from KSL. Here are some recommendations to take advantage of the improving weather, no matter if it is in your town or the mountains.

Go on a low elevation hike. The sun is higher in the sky, melting the snow at lower elevations. These locations are mostly snow-free and conveniently located near the valley floors.

  • The Bonneville Shoreline Trail: Following the shoreline of the now dried-up Lake Bonneville, you can easily do a small section of this trail from one of these convenient access points (the trail extends for over 100 miles along the Wasatch Front).
  • Ensign Peak: This short climb above downtown and Capitol Hill affords beautiful views of the city and surrounding mountains.
  • Antelope Island State Park: Besides breathtaking views of the Great Salt Lake and desert landscapes that are uniquely Utahn, the park features excellent access to wildlife, including large animals like bison and, its namesake, the antelope. Antelope Island State Park is about a 1-hour drive north of Salt Lake City and has a $10-per-vehicle access fee.
See the sights. Explore these cultural, historical, and entertaining sites that Salt Lake City has on offer.
  • Temple Square: Located in the historic center of Salt Lake City, there are so many things to do at Temple Square you may need to visit more than once. Among other activities, this destination features tours, activities specifically for kids, the world’s largest genealogical library, and free performances by The Tabernacle Choir. You won’t be bored and admission is free.
  • Liberty Park and the Tracy Aviary: Located minutes from downtown, Liberty Park features great walking paths, playgrounds for children, and the Tracy Aviary. The aviary features daily events like live bird feedings and bird species from condors to colorful macaws. Liberty Park is free to access and daily admission to the aviary costs $11.95 for adults and $7.95 for children.
Other resources for activities. If none of these activities pique your interest, these online resources offer a virtual treasure trove of ideas.

Visitsaltlake.com: If you are looking to stay close to Salt Lake City, this website showcases dozens of activities in the area.

Visitutah.com: This Utah Office of Tourism website features some of the major attractions and adventures throughout the state.

Timeout.com: This website offers a list of 11 bona fide activities in Utah.

If you missed reading the First Quarter Market Review last week - CLICK HERE to view our electronic version.

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Skiing, Biking and Music in Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Mar 06, 2019

It is still snowing in Park City even with spring right around the corner. This week we wanted to share what is happening in the ski resort world, an upcoming bike challenge and the 2019 Deer Valley music festival lineup.

Bloomberg Businessweek has posted One Pass to Ski Them All Epic Vs. Ikon which shares the evolution of the ski industry - a must read. Alterra and Vail Resorts are going head to head snapping up resorts. Can they save skiing and make selling lift tickets a viable business?

Even among the world’s most polished ski resorts, Deer Valley—with its vast carpets of flawlessly groomed snow spread across four Utah peaks—was always conspicuously clubby. Skiers can pick up a free copy of the Wall Street Journal on their way to the fire, while instructors eat lunch in separate employee cafeterias, lest they mingle with the guests. “The idea was to replicate the service and experience of a five-star hotel,” says Bob Wheaton, who ran the resort for 22 years before stepping aside in January.

But when the lifts started cranking this season, things looked a little different. Among the affluent families were young couples and packs of Salt Lake City friends navigating the runs for the first time. The reason: Deer Valley had suddenly become a bulk-buy product. In 2017 a new conglomerate (later dubbed Alterra Mountain Co.) bought 11 of America’s most popular ski resorts and teamed with dozens more mountain owners to honor a single-season lift ticket called the Ikon Pass. Compared with buying a string of daily lift tickets for as much as $200 a pop, the Ikon Pass (which ranges from $599 to $899) can pay for itself in as few as three days. Only one other product is in direct competition with Ikon: The Epic Pass from Vail Resorts Inc. admits skiers to its aggressively expanding chain of 20 destinations including the company’s namesake ski area in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains.

Together, Alterra’s and Vail’s passes can be swiped at 58 North American resorts, as well as a handful of resorts in Oceania and Europe. The two competing conglomerates are trying to turn occasional skiers into frequent skiers and frequent skiers into serial skiers who incidentally buy a lot of midmountain beers and slopeside hotel rooms. Deer Valley and resorts like it have become a sort of research and development lab forecasting possible futures for the long-struggling ski industry. Skiing isn’t necessarily a bad business—it’s just lumpy and volatile, given natural cycles both economic and meteorological. To read the entire article - CLICK HERE.

Warmer weather will be here before we know it and so will all the spring and summer activities that come with it. In Park City there are amazing bike trails and one of the toughest biking competitions in the world. Here are The Most Challenging Mountain Bike Races You Can Enter in 2019, From XC to Downhill. With most of these events attract world-class athletes, set your sights on personal goals rather than winning. Keep training simple and focused on getting into the best shape possible. Simply finishing any of these events is a huge accomplishment in and of itself.

Park City P2P - One of the few true point-to-point races in North America, riders won’t traverse the same section of trail twice. This race is over 90% singletrack over a total distance of 75 miles with around 12,000 feet of climbing, all while traveling through two of the country’s premier mountain resorts. The P2P is a true adventure-style event, just like the old days of mountain bike racing. Since the course is not closed and there’s no guiding tape, racers will want to prepare, study the course map, and bring a GPS unit with the route pre-loaded. The mental challenge at the P2P is nearly as great as the physical on August 31, 2019. For the the entire article and the other 9 challenging courses - click here.

Looking for something a little less physically taxing, the Utah Symphony's 2019 Deer Valley Music Festival is bringing some big names to Park City this summer. Kristin Chenoweth, Marie Osmond, Indigo Girls, jazz trumpeter Chris Botti, and Broadway singer Renée Elise Goldsberry from the original cast of “Hamilton," are all set to perform with the Utah Symphony. Disney in Concert is also slated for a performance of the studio's biggest hits from its animated films. The concert series will also feature smaller, more intimate performances on Wednesdays at St. Mary's Church in Park City.

Below is the entire schedule of events for the concert series.

2019 DEER VALLEY MUSIC FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

MAIN STAGE – DEER VALLEY SNOW PARK OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATER

2250 Deer Valley Dr. S, Park City, UT

Chris Botti with the Utah Symphony

June 28, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Chris Botti, trumpet

Utah Symphony

Grammy Award-winning trumpeter Chris Botti returns to kick off the Utah Symphony’s 2019 Deer Valley Music Festival with an evening of jazz under the stars.

Marie Osmond with the Utah Symphony

June 29, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Jerry Williams, conductor

Marie Osmond, vocalist

Utah Symphony

Marie Osmond has spent five decades entertaining audiences throughout the world. Her iconic talent is showcased with the Utah Symphony in this concert featuring “Paper Roses,” “Somewhere” from “West Side Story” and selections from her latest album.

Patriotic Celebration with Broadway star Hugh Panaro

July 5, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Michael Krajewski, conductor

Hugh Panaro, vocalist

Utah Symphony

Hugh Panaro is best known for playing the coveted role of Phantom in Broadway’s “The Phantom of the Opera” over 2,000 times. Audiences are invited to celebrate America as he performs hits from Broadway and patriotic favorites at this performance.

Bravo Broadway! Life is a Cabaret

July 6, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Randall Craig Fleischer, conductor

Morgan James, vocalist

Debbie Gravitte, vocalist

Hugh Panaro, vocalist

Utah Symphony

“Chicago.” “Cabaret.” “New York, New York.” The songwriting duo Kander and Ebb collaborated for more than 40 years and delivered hit after hit on the stage and screen. In Life is a Cabaret, the Utah Symphony salutes their contribution to the Great American Songbook while also featuring other Broadway favorites from musicals like “Hairspray,” “Les Misérables,” “Mamma Mia” and “Cats.”

A Tribute to Aretha, Queen of Soul

July 12, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Lucas Waldin, conductor

Capathia Jenkins, vocalist

Ryan Shaw, vocalist

Utah Symphony

Aretha, the “Queen of Soul,” created a legacy that spanned six decades. This concert features Capathia Jenkins and three time Grammy Award-nominee Ryan Shaw performing her iconic hits like “Respect,” “Think,” “A Natural Woman,” “Chain of Fools” and “Amazing Grace.” Created in conjunction with Lucas Waldin and Lesley Sabol

“E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”–Film in Concert with the Utah Symphony

July 13, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Utah Symphony

Director Steven Spielberg's heartwarming masterpiece is one of the brightest stars in motion picture history. Filled with unparalleled magic and imagination, “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial” follows the moving story of a lost little alien who befriends a 10-year-old boy named Elliott. Experience all the mystery and fun of their unforgettable adventure in the beloved movie that captivated audiences around the world, complete with John Williams’ Academy Award-winning score performed live by the Utah Symphony in sync to the film shown on the big screen. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial is a trademark and copyright of Universal Studios. Licensed by Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

Disney in Concert – A Magical Celebration

July 19, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Utah Symphony

The magic of Disney comes to Deer Valley in this multimedia showpiece featuring music from Disney’s “Coco,” “Frozen,” “Moana,” “Beauty and the Beast,” “The Little Mermaid,” “Aladdin” and more. Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts All rights reserved

Renée Elise Goldsberry with the Utah Symphony

July 20, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Renée Elise Goldsberry, vocalist

Utah Symphony

An evening of music with “Hamilton’s” Tony and Grammy Award-winning star Renée Elise Goldsberry. Her spiritually uplifting set includes music from “Rent” and “The Lion King” in addition to tributes to some of the strongest ladies to ever grace a stage such as Aretha Franklin, Nancy Wilson and Sarah Vaughan.

America in Space: A Cinematic Celebration

July 26, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Amy Andersson, conductor

Utah Symphony

America in Space honors the 50th Anniversary of NASA's moon landing featuring film scenes and music from beloved Hollywood films about astronauts, as well as new symphonic music from a NASA Exhibit and NASA documentary footage.

July 27, 2019 Concert

The program and artist for the July 27, 2019 concert at Deer Valley Snow Park Amphitheater will be announced at a later date.

Tchaikovsky’s "1812 Overture" and Piano Concerto No. 1

August 2, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Anna Fedorova, piano

Utah Symphony

Cannoneers of the Wasatch

Tchaikovsky’s explosive “1812 Overture” is paired with live cannon fire and a program that also features Ukrainian pianist Anna Fedorova performing Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1

An Intimate Evening with Kristin Chenoweth and the Utah Symphony

August 3, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Mary Campbell, conductor

Kristin Chenoweth, vocalist

Damien Bassman, drums

Utah Symphony

Kristin Chenoweth shares her memorable songs and show tunes from “Wicked,” “Glee” and more in this performance with the Utah Symphony.

The Music of The Rolling Stones: Circa 1969

August 9, 2019 (Friday) | 7:30 p.m.

Brent Havens, conductor

Tony Vincent, vocalist

Utah Symphony

A multi-media celebration of the 50th Anniversary of two iconic albums—“Beggars Banquet” and “Let It Bleed.”

Indigo Girls with the Utah Symphony

August 10, 2019 (Saturday) | 7:30 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Indigo Girls

Utah Symphony

This concert features the Indigo Girls’ and the Utah Symphony performing larger-than-life arrangements of their songs that don’t sacrifice the emotional intimacy and honesty that have defined the Indigo Girls’ music for decades.

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA SERIES – ST. MARY’S CHURCH

1505 White Pine Canyon Road, Park City UT

Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto

July 10, 2019 (Wednesday) | 8 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Maria Ioudenitch, Violin

Utah Symphony

STRAVINSKY “Danses concertantes”

MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto

FAURÉ Suite from “Pelléas et Mélisande”

DEBUSSY “Suite bergamasque”

Schumann’s Cello Concerto

July 17, 2019 (Wednesday) | 8 p.m.

Christian Reif, conductor

Rainer Eudeikis, cello

Utah Symphony

BEETHOVEN “Coriolan Overture”

HONEGGER “Pastorale d’été”

R. SCHUMANN Cello Concerto

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 2

Beethoven & Dvoák: The Romantic Violin

July 24, 2019 (Wednesday) | 8 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Kathryn Eberle, violin

Utah Symphony

BEETHOVEN (arr. Mahler) String Quartet No. 11, "Serioso”

BEETHOVEN Romance No. 2 for Violin and Orchestra

DVOÁK Romance for Violin and Orchestra

RAVEL “Pavane for a Dead Princess”

MOZART Symphony No. 36, "Linz"

Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23

July 31, 2019 (Wed) | 8 p.m.

Conner Gray Covington, conductor

Aristo Sham, piano (2018 Gina Bachauer International Artists Piano Competition Silver Medalist)

Utah Symphony

MOZART Piano Concerto No. 23

ARVO PÄRT “If Bach had been a Beekeeper”

BRAHMS Serenade No. 2

Schubert’s Symphony No. 3

August 7, 2019 (Wed) | 8 p.m.

David Danzmayr, conductor

Bokyung Byun, Guitar

Utah Symphony

MOZART Divertimento No. 1

RODRIGO “Fantasia para un gentilhombre”

TAUSKÝ Coventry (Meditation for String Orchestra)

SCHUBERT Symphony No. 3

GALLERY SERIES

Small ensembles from the Utah Symphony performing at these concerts will be announced at a later date.

Gallery MAR

436 Main St, Park City, Utah

Monday, July 15, 2019 | Doors 6 p.m. | Performance 6:30 p.m.

Susan Swartz Studios

260 Main St, Park City, Utah

Monday, July 22, 2019 | Doors 6 p.m. | Performance 6:30 p.m.

www.deervalleymusicfestival.org.

FIS Championships and Real Estate Updates

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Feb 05, 2019

This week we wanted to share what is happening in Park City in the midst of the FIS World Championships, what states are growing the fastest in the US and which home improvements have the highest return on investment in 2019.

The FIS World Championships bring in over 1,500 athletes to compete in aerials, SX snowboardcross and skicross, and moguls. The Park Record shares that Aerials, one of the original freestyle events, is also flying into new territory. On Feb. 7, athletes will compete in the World Championship debut of team aerials at Deer Valley Resort's Owl Run.

The traditional aerials finals are scheduled for Feb. 6 on the same course. Both events are judged, in which athletes fly off high-angle jumps to complete multiple spins and flips in a single jump. Snowboardcross and Skicross, in which groups of athletes race down a course that features drops, ramps and jumps, made their Olympic debuts in 2006 and 2010 respectively.

Deer Valley's World Cups are marked as a high point in the moguls season among athletes because of the quality of course and accommodations as well as the tight-knit corps of volunteers that run the competition. Moguls is both a timed and judged sport. Athletes are judged on their skiing technique and the tricks they perform off of two jumps, which is added to their timed run down the slope. Spectators can see that course from the same area as the aerials competition. For more information and a detailed schedule of events, go to 2019worldchamps.com.

Western States Fare Best in Population Growth - Which states are growing the fastest and adding new residents? Idaho and Nevada once again lead the states in population growth rates, according to the latest U.S. Census Bureau figures. Demographic changes can be key to projecting future housing needs, the National Association of Home Builders explained on its Eye On Housing blog post analyzing the census numbers. Between July 1, 2017, to July 1, 2018, Nevada posted a population growth rate of 2.09 percent, while Idaho grew by 2.05 percent. The other three of the five fastest-growing states: Utah, Arizona, and Florida.

However, Texas had the largest increase in its population by number—adding 379,128 people between July 1, 2017, and July 1, 2018. Florida, California, Arizona, and North Carolina followed with the largest numerical increases to their populations. New York and Illinois posted the largest declines in population during that time period. Overall, the U.S. population increased by 2 million between July 1, 2017, and July 1, 2018. The U.S. population now stands at 327.2 million.

Cost vs. Value: The Home Improvement Projects With the Highest ROI in 2019 Remodelers across the country took a hit last summer as the cost of building materials spiked dramatically, and the picture for 2019 isn't much rosier. The percentage of return on investment (ROI) is projected to trend downward for all the replacement projects listed in Remodeling magazine's newly-released Cost vs. Value Report.

Larger indoor remodel projects took a hit as well, but weren't impacted as greatly as replacement projects as they rely more on labor costs rather than material costs.

"With the increasing costs of building materials and labor, we urge remodelers to think like real estate professionals first,” says Clayton DeKorne, editor-in-chief of Remodeling magazine. "When you adjust your focus to think like a broker first, you can dull clients’ No. 1 pain point—cost—with a discussion of the amount that can be recouped."

Nationally, here are the five projects with the greatest ROI in the report's mid-range cost category:

Manufactured Stone Veneer(94.9% ROI)

  • Average Cost: $8,907
  • Average Resale Value: $8,449
Minor Kitchen Remodel(80.5% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $22,507
  • Average Resale Value: $18,123
Deck Addition (Wood)(75.6% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $13,333
  • Average Resale Value: $10,083
Siding Replacement(75.6% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $16,036
  • Average Resale Value: $12,119
Entry Door Replacement (Steel)(74.9% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $1,826
  • Average Resale Value: $1,368
And the five projects with the greatest ROI in the report's upscale cost category are:

Garage Door Replacement(97.5% ROI)

  • Average Cost: $3,611
  • Average Resale Value: $3,520
Window Replacement (Vinyl)(73.4% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $16,802
  • Average Resale Value: $12,332
Grand Entrance (Fiberglass)(71.9% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $8,994
  • Average Resale Value: $6,469
Window Replacement (Wood)(70.8% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $20,526
  • Average Resale Value: $14,530
Bathroom Remodel(60.2% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $64,743
  • Average Resale Value: $38,952
Nationally—and on the other end of the spectrum—here are the five projects with the lowest ROI in the mid-range cost category:

Backyard Patio(55.2% ROI)

  • Average Cost: $56,906
  • Average Resale Value: $31,430
Master Suite Addition(59.4% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $130,986
  • Average Resale Value: $77,785
Bathroom Addition(60.6% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $47,427
  • Average Resale Value: $28,726
Roofing Replacement (Metal)(60.9% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $38,600
  • Average Resale Value: $23,526
Major Kitchen Remodel(62.1% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $66,196
  • Average Resale Value: $41,133
And the five projects with the lowest ROI in the upscale cost category are:

Master Suite Addition(50.4% ROI)

  • Average Cost: $271,470
  • Average Resale Value: $136,820
Bathroom Addition(58.1% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $87,704
  • Average Resale Value: $51,000
Major Kitchen Remodel(59.7% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $131,510
  • Average Resale Value: $78,524
Bathroom Remodel(60.2% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $64,743
  • Average Resale Value: $38,952
Window Replacement (Wood)(70.8% ROI)
  • Average Cost: $20,526
  • Average Resale Value: $14,530
  • The 2019 Cost vs. Value Report surveyed more than 3,200 real estate professionals about returns for 22 popular renovation projects in 136 different U.S. housing markets—up from 100 markets last year. View the full report, including project descriptions and city-level data, here.

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Living The Life In Park City

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 22, 2018

Park City is a great place to live, work, play and visit. This week we wanted to share Park City Magazine's Dig into Park City’s Past with 5 Unique Tours. If you’ve ever wandered the streets or slopes of Park City, you’ve probably stumbled across a historic relic or two. From abandoned mines and tram towers to commemorative statues, history is alive and well in Park City. What can we say? We really love celebrating our past and we’ve found plenty of ways to do it, including an annual Miner’s Day celebration that takes place every Labor Day. Whether you’re a longtime local or an out-of-towner, one of the best ways to delve into Park City’s mining past is via a tour. Forget a dull lecture, these five historic adventure-tours offer fun, interesting, and unique ways to explore Park City. Check out the complete article to find out about the Mines and Wines tours, guided historical hikes at Deer Valley, the Park City Ghost tours, the historical Glenwood Cemetery tour and the Silver to Slopes Mining tour. Park City Magazine

Forbes recently shared 10 Reasons To Live (The Dream) In Park City, Utah and it starts with “Quality of life.” Why would someone want to move to Park City, Utah? The answer to this should be self evident. But since you asked, here are 10 good reasons:

1. Some of the Best Ski Resorts in the World: At 7,000 feet above sea level, Park City has a year-round population of about 25,000 and is home to two ski resorts: Deer Valley Resort and Park City Mountain Resort. The former was voted the #1 ski resort in North America by SKI Magazine (2018) and is exclusive to skiers. The latter has the most skiable terrain (7,300 acres) in the United States and is open to snowboarders.

2. More Amazing Ski Resorts: There are many more world-class ski resorts within an hour’s drive: Alta, Snowbird, Brighton, Solitude, Snowbasin, and Powder Mountain to name a few. Not to mention Powderbird Helicopter Skiing, which picks up in town.

3. Education: The public school system is the best in the state, and Park City High School ranks in the top 2% nationally. Park City public schools let out at 12:30pm on Fridays so students can go skiing or participate in other sports. There is also Winter Sports School, a charter high school that operates on a reverse schedule to accommodate winter competition and travel. If private school is preferred, Park City Day School goes from kindergarten to eighth grade and has been under the leadership of Ian Crossland for the past year.

4. Convenience: Salt Lake City International Airport is a 30- to 45-minute drive from town (no traffic), from where a flight to LA or San Francisco is about 1.5 hours. To accommodate growth, the Utah Department of Transportation has been widening highways, resurfacing roads and expanding traffic circles on a huge scale this year, all of which is well ahead of any congestion issues.

5. Business Opportunities: The Beehive state is booming. The Salt Lake/Provo/Park City triangle, dubbed Silicon Slopes, is an emerging tech powerhouse. This is supported by two universities (the University of Utah and BYU) as well as big tech companies (Adobe, Microsoft) and several startup unicorns (Banjo, Domo, Qualtrics).

6. All Four Seasons: Summers are actually better than winters. High temperatures average about 80 degrees F with low humidity. In early June, the aspen trees and wild flowers explode into bloom. Soon the mountainous landscape becomes a tapestry of rich greens that seem to glow as the sun sets after 9:00 pm on the summer solstice. Just 25 minutes away is the Jordanelle Reservoir, which supports boating, paddleboarding, wake surfing, fishing or just relaxing on a pontoon boat for the day. Lest I forget, Park City is home to seven golf courses.

7. Mountain Biking: Park City holds the distinction of being the very first Gold Level Ride Center, deemed as such by the International Mountain Bike Association (IMBA). “It all stems from a commitment to master planning,” says IMBA’s VP of Programs, James Clark. “The sheer miles of trails are fantastic, but what’s important is that they function as a cohesive network, with signage and trail connections that create a model riding area.” That network includes nearly 500 miles of singletrack trails that appeal to all ability levels. Plus, Deer Valley runs the lifts for mountain biking and is continually building trails to expand its world-class bike park.

8. Cost of Living: Moving from high-tax states like New York and California can reduce living costs substantially, especially given new tax laws. According to TaxFoundation.org, Utah ranks middle of the pack nationally (25th) for state income taxes with a maximum rate of 5%. For combined sales tax, Utah is 29th at 6.77%. As for property taxes, the Beehive State is 40th at an average of 0.65%. However, the property tax rate in Summit County (Park City) is only 0.463%. According to some back-of-the-napkin math, you’ll get three- to four-times as much house for the money compared to LA’s West Side. And property values appreciated 9.9% annually as of Q1, which ranks fifth in the country according to the FHFA.

9. The State of Utah: Park City is one of many gems in a state full of natural riches. Utah is home to five of the premier National Parks: Zion, Bryce Canyon, Arches, Canyonlands, and Capital Reef — all within a few hours drive time. Renowned mountain biking and off-roading destination, Moab, Utah, is a five-hour drive and also offers access to rafting on the Colorado River. A little further and you can be in The Grand Canyon, Grand Teton, and Yellowstone National Parks.

10. All About the Community: When you move to Park City and meet someone who lives in Park City, it’s something very powerful you have in common. More than likely you’re both here for these 10 reasons and many others. There’s an immediate bond. Our next-door neighbors hosted a welcome-to-Park-City party three days after we arrived and invited the surrounding neighbors. I can send a group text to locate my kids in the neighborhood and have them sent home. My wife has made lifelong friends at Park City’s premier workout studio/social club, Beau Collective, through a shared passion for fitness. This is partly because the majority of Park City residents are transplants from California, Ohio, Michigan, Texas, Washington and all parts Back East. And since we all moved here for about the same reasons, it creates a community fabric that is woven together with a combination of Lycra, Gore-Tex, carbon fiber and a profound sense of joy and gratitude.

Real Estate Statistical Report

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Aug 22, 2018

This week we are sharing the Park City Board of REALTORS®' Year-over-Year Statistical Report - The Voice for Real Estate® in the Wasatch Back. The recent housing statistics for Summit and Wasatch Counties, as reported by the Park City Board of REALTORS®, revealed continued demand and increase in median sales price.

At the close of the second quarter of 2018, the number of single-family home sales in the Greater Park City Area increased by 6%, vacant land by 5%, while the condominium sector was slightly down compared to last year’s sales. Demand continued to rise on a gradual level, with single-family homes accounting for 49% of the total dollar volume, condominium sales for 40%, and vacant land for 11% of the market share.

Single-Family Home Sales - Year-over-year, the number of single-family home sales within the City Limits was up 9%, while the median price of $1.93 M remained flat to last year. By neighborhood, Old Town had the highest number of sales – up 36%, while there were 20% fewer sales in Park Meadows.

Snyderville Basin reported more than twice the number of home sales as the City Limits – a 4% increase over last year – with the median price climbing to $1.13 M – up 17%. In Silver Creek sales were up 40% and 37% in median sales price reaching $1.16 M. By neighborhood, Promontory had the highest number of sales in the Basin with 77 sold homes in the last 12 months.Activity in the Jordanelle area had a sizable increase in sales with a 14% median price increase reaching $1.73 M.

Sales in the Heber Valley continued at a strong pace, with nearly one sale a day, and a 28% median price increase to $506,000. There were 20 more homes sold in Red Ledges compared to last year, with a median sales price of $1.16 M – up 8%. Midway continued to thrive with 96 closed sales and 17% median price increase reaching $544,000.

“There are many factors contributing to the numbers we are seeing in the Heber Valley. Despite the sharp increase in construction costs, single-family homes are still well below Park City prices. With new amenities in the Heber Valley and excellent schools, buyers are weighing their options,” said Park City Board of REALTORS® President, Todd Anderson.

In the Kamas Valley, the number of sales decreased 15%, though the median price climbed 10% to $412,000. Sales numbers in the Wanship, Hoytsville, Coalville, Echo, & Henefer areas remained the same with a median price of $359,000.

Condominium & Townhome Sales - Year over year, the number of condo sales within the City Limits was up 8% and up 15% in median price to $787,000. The Snyderville Basin reported essentially the same number sales as last year with 308 units and median price of $503,000.

Anderson explained, “The difference between these two areas may be attributed to the completion of developments in Empire Pass versus the reserved or pending status of to-be-built product in Canyons Resort Village.” The Kimball Junction area, which can offer primary residence condominiums, saw flat sales but a 15% median price increase to $385,500.

The number of closed sales dropped 20% in the Jordanelle area possibly due to lack of inventory as new construction projects have been absorbed, but there was a 12% increase in median price reaching $528,000.

Vacant Land Sales - Park City Limits saw 14 more lot sales than last year and a 15% median price increase reaching $820,000. By neighborhood, Promontory had the highest number of land sales in the Basin with 72, and the median price continued its upward tick reaching $405,000. Canyons Village saw increased sales activity and a 22% median price increase to $2.28 M.

Conclusion - Historically, July and August are the months with the highest level of inventory for homes and condos in the Wasatch Back – and Q2 of 2018 was just below Q2 of 2017. In some of the most desirable neighborhoods, a shortfall of for-sale properties have placed an upward pressure on the median prices. With the demand for all that the Wasatch Back lifestyle has to offer, listed properties have been selling at a faster pace. In the last 12 months, the average length for a home to sell was less than 6 months in the Basin and less than 11 months in the City Limits.

The complexity of individual neighborhoods and micro-markets in the Greater Park City Area are reasons that buyers and sellers should be advised to contact a Park City Board of REALTORS® professional for the most accurate, detailed, and current information.

Golf & Second Quarter Market Review

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jul 25, 2018

This week we wanted to share links to each of the amazing golf courses in the Park City area as well as the 2018 Second Quarter Market Review. Click on each of the images below for a larger, full page view.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now on to golf, one of my favorite past times.

PUBLIC COURSES

Park City Golf Club

The Canyons Resort Golf Club 

Wasatch Golf – Mountain Course (Midway)

Wasatch Golf – Lake Course (Midway)

Soldier Hollow – Gold Course(Midway

Soldier Hollow – SIlver Course (Midway)

PRIVATE COURSES

Glenwild Golf Club

Jeremy Golf & Country Club

Park Meadows Golf Club

Promontory Club – Jack Nicklaus Painted Valley Course

Promontory Club – Pete Dye Canyon Course

Red Ledges Golf Club

Tuhaye Golf Club

Victory Ranch Golf Club

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Park City Real Estate

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 16, 2018

The housing market Gets Hotter in the West according the MReport. A study of 16,000 U.S. zip codes by Realtor.com found that, overwhelmingly, the ZIP codes seeing the fastest movement of homes are in the West. Nationally, the report stated, houses are generally on the market for an average of 78 days. But in the 20 markets where homes sold fastest in Q1, they sold after an average 21 days on the market; in the top three ZIP codes, in fact, barely past three weeks. That reflects “a pattern that other markets hope to replicate. In fact, we speculated as to whether Salt Lake City, Utah is the ‘New Denver’ earlier this year and now we see Salt Lake City breaking into the top 20 ZIPs.” Salt Lake, in fact, finished 20th on the list. Homes there moved in an average 21 days during the quarter.

Looking to rent a bike this weekend, Summit County has implemented new features for the electric bike share program. Summit County is hoping to add more station kiosks later this summer. The stations will likely be located at the Snyderville Basin Recreation Fieldhouse, in the Silver Springs and Trailside neighborhoods, City Park in Park City, and, eventually, at the Jeremy Ranch park-and-ride lot and another park-and-ride lot expected to be built at Ecker Hill. An additional 42 bikes were added to the fleet this season to help handle demand, according to Caroline Rodriguez, Summit County's regional transportation director. Also, a stricter system will also be in place to reduce users from riding the bikes outside of the authorized zones.

Triathlete posted a great article that we wanted to share - Head to Utah and follow our advice on where to swim, bike, run and more in this active mountain town. This friendly mountain town sits just under 7,000 feet—that’s 1,500 feet higher than Boulder for those counting—and boasts 400 miles of trails, sunny days with low humidity, and a welcoming, athletic culture. Visit in summer or early fall to experience the best of this under-the-radar training hub.

Stay Here - Local lodging experts Stay Park City make it easy to find accommodations, whether you’re looking for a lux hotel or comfy vacation condo. Plus, the company sponsors a local cycling group—so clearly they have good taste.

Swim Here - You can find lap swim and masters groups in Park City year round, but summertime means all the outdoor pools are open for workouts. Check out the offerings at Park City MARC, Silver Mountain, Basin Recreation, and Ecker Hills Aquatics Center.

Bike Here - Sync up with the aforementioned Stay Park City Cycling Club for one of their weekly group road or mountain bike rides. Head to Ritual Chocolate on Sunday at 10 a.m. for a 40–45 mile group ride open to both locals and visitors, divided into three groups by ability level. “A core principle of our club is ‘all-inclusive,’ from weekend warriors to CAT 1 racers and folks just passing through town,” says club president Jason Linder. One of his consistent favorites is this 28-mile loop to Kamas from Park City. “It takes you out of town on wide roads, with no stops, some good climbs, and beautiful views,” he says. If you’re looking to climb your heart out, copy the challenging Suffertational route to ascend some of Park City’s toughest hills.

Run Here - With 400 miles of continuous trails throughout Park City, you won’t run out of options for run training. “The Mid Mountain Trail is a classic trail run [or mountain bike ride], consisting of 20-plus miles of single track hovering around 8,000 feet,” Linder says. For a flat, mostly paved route, the Rail Trail extends for nearly 30 miles from the center of town.

Eat Here - If your ideal recovery snack is avocado toast, you must try Harvest or Five5eeds, two Australian-influenced cafés with colorful breakfast dishes and solid coffee. Get your second caffeine hit of the day of the day at STOKED Roasters at the top of Main Street, owned by accomplished ultra-runner Jax Mariash. After a long training day, treat yourself to burgers and a milkshake at the Montage Deer Valley’s Burgers & Bourbon. (Insider tip: Head to the Montage fire pits around 8 p.m. in the summer months for gourmet s’mores.)

Test Here - Park City has a strong Olympic heritage, as evidenced by the caliber of local athletes and sports facilities in town. The Intermountain Healthcare LiVe Well Center features a state-of-the-art sports performance arm overseen by Dr. Max Testa—a 30-year Tour de France doctor—and offers a slew of testing from Vo2 Max, lactate threshold, gait analysis and much more.

Race Here - Tackle the sprint or Olympic-distance of the Jordanelle Triathlon in August, featuring a clear reservoir swim, mountain-backdrop bike and a run along partial single track through a nature preserve. Test your uphill running prowess at one of the Triple Trail Challenge events—the 16-mile June routes races up to the 10,000-foot Jupiter Peak.

The Park City School District

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Apr 04, 2018

The Park City School district is back in the news with MSN Money as the Best School District in the state of Utah. Few public services in the United States contain such stark differences in quality as the public education system. While there are several school districts that spend more than $50,000 per student on education each year, in other districts education expenditures amount to less than $2,000 per student.

That difference in spending contributes to major disparities in student outcomes throughout the country. The majority of a school’s budget is spent on staff and teacher salaries. A school that is able to attract the best teachers can give their students a major advantage. Those advantages are often the greatest in the most affluent parts of the country. Approximately 44% of all school funding in the United States comes from local sources such as property tax. As a result, most of the highest quality school districts are in wealthy counties where a majority of households make more than double that of the typical American household.

To determine the best school district in every state, 24/7 Wall St. developed an index based on various measures of child poverty, per-pupil expenditure, graduation rate, teachers per student, the percentage of adults with a bachelor’s degree, preschool enrollment, and AP enrollment.

Best school district: Park City School District - Location: Summit County

Per student spending: $11,238 (total enrollment: 4,872) with a High school graduation rate: 89.1%

Adults with a bachelor's degree: 63.0%

Looking for something fun to do - here are some upcoming events.

4/5 - 4/7: Thin Air Innovation Festival, Park City

4/6 - 6/23: Utah Warrior Rugby, Sandy

4/6: Toby Keith with Ned LeDoux, Salt Lake City

4/7: OK GO, Park City

4/7: 22nd Annual Pond Skimming Competition, Park City Mountain

4/11 - 4/27: Hamilton - An American Musical, Salt Lake City

4/12: Justin Timberlake, Salt Lake

BACK IN THE NEWS - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties Ranks as One of Nation’s Top-Producing Brokerage Firms in RISMedia’s 2018 Power Broker Report. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties, headquartered in Park City, Utah recently announced its ranking as the No. 89 real estate firm in the U.S. in sales volume, according to RISMedia’s 30th Annual Power Broker Report. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties is the #1 independently-owned brokerage in Utah by dollar volume for 2016 and 2017. In 2017 Utah Properties reported a total sales volume of over $2 billion, representing over 3,800 closed residential transactions.

RISMedia President and CEO John Featherston congratulated Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties for their prestigious ranking in this year's Power Broker Report. "The firms represented are the nation's most elite brokerage firms serving literally millions of consumers with their real estate needs," Featherston said. "Even up against extremely scarce supply, Power Brokers posted remarkable sales. With the economy expanding and home prices on a tear, they're charging forward and leveraging the opportunities. We applaud their commitment to homeownership and congratulate them on their Power Broker standing."

Highlights from the 2018 Power Broker Report & Survey include:

  • Seventy-one percent of Power Brokers are challenged most by the lack of housing supply.
  • The majority of Power Brokers (38 percent) believe first-time homebuyers and millennials are their greatest opportunity.
  • The majority of Power Brokers (38 percent) believe the housing market is "growing;" 30 percent believe it is stable.
Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties is an independently owned real estate brokerage dating back to 1976. With offices throughout northern Utah, the company has a long-standing track record of market dominance and dependability. Under the Berkshire Hathaway name, our agency holds the #1 position in Utah’s real estate marketplace and maintains an historic commitment to community-driven service.

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Best High School in Utah

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jan 03, 2018

USA Today published Best Public High Schools in Every State and Park City High School is the best in the state of Utah. To determine the best public high school in every state, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed rankings for all public schools from school and neighborhood data clearinghouse Niche. Data on rank, number of students, student-teacher ratio, average graduation rate, average SAT score, average ACT score, and AP enrollment also came from Niche. Data on the ratio of students to teachers by state came from the National Center for Education Statistics.

Across the country, just over 80% of students graduate, 4.9% of students enroll in Advanced Placement classes, and the average SAT score is a little over 1000 out of 1600. In some of the nation’s top public schools, virtually all students graduate, AP enrollment is well above 70%, and average SAT scores are above 1400.Park City High School has 1,131 students with a student-teacher ratio of 19:1 and an average SAT: 1240 making it best in the state of Utah. To read the entire article click here.

The latest edition of the Welcome to Park City guide is now available. This 24 page guide is an excellent resource for Park City real estate and is easily accessible in digital format. Click here to enjoy the digital and interactive guide. Park City is the place to be. Named ‘The Best Town in America’ by Outside Magazine, the small resort town of Park City is situated in the middle of the mighty Wasatch range in the Rocky Mountains and is known for hosting the 2002 Winter Olympics, world-class skiing, miles of hiking and mountain biking trails, and the Sundance Film Festival. Park City and the surrounding areas of East Summit County, the Heber Valley, and the Jordanelle provide a panorama of outdoor recreation such as hiking, camping, biking, fishing, boating, rock climbing, worldclass skiing and snowboarding, snowshoeing, and so much more. From award-winning restaurants, boutique shops, exceptional art galleries, historical theaters, and concert venues, Park City has no shortage of arts, culture, and activities. This guide is your introduction to Park City, the surrounding areas, and the adventures that await.

Open House & October Events

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Oct 03, 2017

We are hosting an Open House today from 12:00 noon to 3:00 pm at 7430 Buckboard Drive Park City, UT 84098.

Come and enjoy Ramon's Famous Jack Daniels BBQ Meatballs and an exceptional theater room demonstration.

Bring your family & friends to this home that has been beautifully remodeled & upgraded throughout. New Ponderosa Pine Wood floors, Orite Granite Fireplace and Breakfast bar, Fresco Plaster, all new Bosch appliances, recessed lighting in dining room, new office, new carpet, new 8 ft doors on Main Level....speaking of Main Level...Master, office, living room dining, hearth room and kitchen all on the main floor...Traditional mountain living with 3-car garage, large floor to ceiling windows Private yet has views! Driveway half plumbed for radiant heat. Balconies galore....the inside of this home is 90% new...and yes a separate entrance for the mother in law apartment!.... Bedrooms: 7 and Bathrooms: 4 Full, 1 3/4, 1 Half with 5,379 sq. ft. on 0.96 acres. Year Built: 1994 Remodeled 2017

This week we wanted to share Eight Tips For Staging Your Home. We are also available to assist in this process and work with great companies that share a professional touch.

1. Focus On The Curb Appeal -The first thing that potential buyers will see is the outside of your house. The lawn, landscaping, front porch, front door, and driveway are the first impression your home is going to make, so spruce up the lawn, plant some flowers, paint the front door, reseal the driveway, whatever it takes to make a good first impression.

2. Time For Some Deep Cleaning - This is crucial in home staging and is more than just picking up and vacuuming. Clean the spaces in the home that haven’t been cleaned for a very long time (or ever), including baseboards, vent covers, ceiling fans, and the fireplace.

3. Brush On A Fresh Coat Of Paint - A fresh coat of paint in main rooms or throughout the house can bring a home back to life. Renew the space with neutral, crowd pleasing colors. This can also help potential buyers envision themselves living in the home.

4. Give Each Room A Purpose - A spare room can make fantastic guest bedroom, home office, or gym. Each room should be transformed into a usable space where the buyers can envision what they can do with the room.

5. Update The Kitchen Fixtures - Luckily, minor changes in the kitchen can make the space feel more modern and updated. Consider replacing old light fixtures with modern ones or swap outdated hardware.

6. Brighten The Bathrooms - Light colors or white make things appear fresher, cleaner, newer, and more spacious. Brighten up your bathroom with a fresh coat of paint or with new white towels, shower curtain, and bathmat to give your bathroom a clean and relaxed feel.

7. Bring In The Light - Curtains are beautiful, but they can darken and date a room. Potential buyers want to see the home in all it's glory; so pull up the blinds, open the curtains, and make sure the windows are spotless to let as much light in as possible.

8. Highlight The Positives - Every house has its own stand-out features, whether its unique woodwork, great flow, or a stunning backyard, boost the appeal of your home by playing up the positives.

OCTOBER EVENTS

Mondays thru Saturdays: Midway Creamery Hay Maze and Pumpkin Patch, Midway

Mondays, until 10/23: Happy Valley Farmers Market, Springville

Mondays, until 10/30: Light Up the Night Halloween Parade, Thanksgiving Point

Tuesdays, until 10/17: 2017 Tuesday Harvest Market, Salt Lake City

Wednesdays, until 10/25: Sugar House Farmer's Market, Salt Lake City

Wednesdays, until 10/25: Park City Farmer's Market, Park City

All Month Long: Homestead Resort Annual Scarecrow Festival, Midway

Thursdays, until 10/26: Bountiful City Farmers Market, Bountiful

Fridays, until 10/27: Happy Valley Farmers Market, Orem

Saturdays, until 10/28: Trick-or-Treat Parade, Thanksgiving Point

Saturdays, until 10/21: Cache Valley Gardener's Market, Logan

Saturdays in October: Trick or Treat Parade, Thanksgiving Point

Thusdays - Saturdays: Haunted Wagon Train, Heber City

Saturdays and Sundays, until 10/15: Oktoberfest 2017, Snowbird

Weekends in October: Frightmares, Lagoon

All October: McCoard's Provo Corn Maze, Provo

Now - 10/8: Thriller by Odyssey Dance Theatre, Park City & Salt Lake City

Now - 10/8: Thriller - Odyssey Dance Theatre, Park City

Now - 10/15: Dine About, Park City

10/5 - 10/7: The Pumpkin Train, Heber City

10/7: 8th Annual Harvest Fest, Kamas

10/13 - 10/22: Haunted Aquarium, Draper

10/14: Monster Mash & Dash, Kaysville

10/14: The Color Run Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City

10/14: Park City Sunrise Rotary Shot Ski, Park City

10/19 - 10/22: Aladdin, Salt Lake City

10/20: Haunted Night at the Museum: Viking Ghost Ship, Salt Lake City

10/21 - 10/21: Fall Harvest Festival, Wellsville

10/24: Disney in Concert: Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas, Salt Lake City

10/27: Halloween Party, Snowbird

10/31: Howl-O-Ween! on Historic Main Street, Park City

Thursday - Saturdays: Daily Pumpkin Train, Heber City

Our Favorite Town

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 14, 2017

Our favorite town is no stranger to awards and accolades. So this week we thought we would share a few of the publications that rank Park City among the top cities and towns in American (and even the world). There may not be a perfect place, but if you ask us (and apparently editors and travelers across the globe) Park City is pretty close.

Conde Nast Traveler - #1 Friendliest Cities: Park City is a "friendlier and more casual" mountain town, where even at the height of winter ski season or the Sundance Film Festival in January, "the locals were extremely friendly and welcoming." World & U.S. - #1 Park City, Utah & The Best Small City in the U.S #6 Park City, Utah

An iconic mountain town frequented by ski buffs and Sundance festees, Park City was this year voted one of Traveler’s friendliest cities in the world—and for good reason. Though most popular in the winter, Park City shines in all seasons: For spring, summer, and fall hiking and mountain biking, the city has nearly 400 miles of maintained trails. Mark off time for a stroll (or two) down picturesque Main Street, and don’t miss nearby Utah Olympic Park, which comprises a museum but is still used as an Olympic training facility today.

L.A. Times 17 Destinations for 2017 - #8 Park City is 45 minutes from the Salt Lake City airport. It has an old-fashioned Main Street. And it has the biggest ski resort in the country: Park City Mountain Resort, which combined with Canyons Resort in 2015, setting off changes all over town.

Chef John Murcko’s Firewood Restaurant opened in December at 306 Main St. At 314 Main, visitors can browse landscape photos at David Beavis Gallery. At 509 Main, get caffeine from Pink Elephant Coffee Roasters. At 738 Main, get a sugar fix at Peace, Love & Little Donuts. At 890 Main, taste wine at Old Town Cellars, a private-label winery. (All opened in 2016.)

Trip Advisor Top Destinations on the Rise #2 Only 35 minutes from the SLC Airport, Park City's rugged beauty is complemented by over 100 restaurants and bars, open air concerts, numerous spas and health clubs, plays, independent film screenings, a series of world-class events and festivals, and as many kinds of lodging as there are people.

Travel & Leisure - America’s Favorite Towns #1 Outdoor bliss meets artistic street cred: America’s winning town offers snow, sunshine, and a good chance of celeb-spotting. Readers gave the city near-perfect marks for its weather and for its festivals—thanks in part, no doubt, to winter’s Sundance Film Festival. Since Utah has relaxed its liquor laws over the years, Park City also scored well with readers for wine. Choose from the extensive wine list at Glitretind, at Stein Eriksen Lodge, or the long list of bottles at the new Main Street hotspot Tupelo, whose artisanal menu includes such delights as Rocky Mountain Elk Bolognese.

America’s Favorite Mountain Towns - No. 1: Park City, Utah - When the local mines closed, Park City, Utah, turned its ambitions above ground—to its 7,000 acres of Olympic-level ski terrain—helping it transition into one of the country’s premier resort destinations, and this year’s favorite mountain town. Off the slopes, everyone converges on historic Main Street, flanked by a mix of adventure outfitters, galleries, and restaurants—including Tupelo, chef Matt Harris’s ode to elevated Rocky Mountain cuisine. Sundance Film Festival brings in the A-Listers, who feel at home in the town’s luxe hotels, like Stein Eriksen Lodge, a Norwegian-style chalet.

Sunset Magazine - 2016 Best Adventure Town - Ski towns have long been about much more than a day on the slopes. Park City, Utah, just happens to be more fun than many others; the winner for best adventure town has a gently sloping Main Street lined with shops and farm-driven eats.

The state of Utah is also a great place - For the 10th year in a row, Utah earns the top spot for states with the best economic outlook, followed by Indiana, North Carolina, North Dakota and Tennessee, according to a recent American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) report, Rich States, Poor States: ALEC-Laffer State Economic Competitiveness Index. The annual publication is celebrating its 10th edition with the launch of a new website that gives users the ability to compare and contrast economic trends of the last decade, featuring a new tool showing how particular policy adjustments can change the economic outlook ranking of an individual state.

State lawmakers have relied upon Rich States, Poor States as a guide for measuring the economic competitiveness of their states since 2008. The publication is authored by Dr. Arthur B. Laffer, a member of Ronald Reagan’s Economic Policy Advisory Board, Stephen Moore, distinguished visiting fellow at The Heritage Foundation, and Jonathan Williams, ALEC Chief Economist and Vice President of the ALEC Center for State Fiscal Reform.

“For an unprecedented ten years, since the very founding of Rich States, Poor States, Utah has reigned as number one in terms of economic outlook. This is largely due to the state’s many responsible fiscal policies, including an efficient and lean state government, a low overall tax burden and the state’s right-to-work status,” said Jonathan Williams. “In addition, the public sector pension reforms of 2010 have undoubtedly benefitted Utah in the rankings. Congratulations to the Utah legislators who consistently show their dedication to protecting hard-earned taxpayer dollars and promoting a strong state economy."

Neighborhoods and Activities

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
Jun 06, 2017

Nestled beneath the beautiful slopes of the Wasatch range and just minutes away from Park City’s Main Street and Salt Lake, the communities of Pinebrook, Jeremy Ranch, and Summit Park offer perfect single family home and condominium options for commuters and outdoor enthusiasts.

With out-the-door access to Flying Dog and other legendary Park City trail systems, these communities offer some of the best recreation in the area. As for amenities, Pinebrook is home to numerous restaurants, yoga studios, and grocery stores, which create a strong sense of community among these adjacent neighborhoods. Jeremy Ranch also offers golf via its private club and manicured full course.

In terms of real estate: Jeremy Ranch is known for spacious single family homes that are bathed in sunlight and feature dramatic views. Pinebrook consists of a wide array of entry, custom and luxury home options that make this neighborhood popular among Millennials. Just up Parley's hill from Pinebrook, Summit Park offers secluded homes encompassed by mountain wilderness and numerous trail systems that award adventurers with stunning views of the Salt Lake Valley.

For anyone looking to be within easy driving distance from Salt Lake and all the recreational options Park City has to offer, be sure to look at Pinebrook, Jeremy Ranch, and Summit Park real estate.

June marks the beginning of summer in Park City. With the opening of summer resort operations, visitors and locals can make the most of world class downhill biking, chairlift hiking, rides and mini golf at the bases. With our award-winning trail system, blue bird weather, and championship golf options, we are truly an all-season community. Not-to-miss events include the mouth-watering Savor the Summit dinner, when Park City restaurants come together to line Main Street with tables for an evening of communal fine dining that draws the whole town. Also, be sure to get your Oakley Rodeo tickets--one of our favorite events of the year.

Golf Community Sales - Summit and Wasatch counties are popular amongst golfers, and the number of vacant land and single family home sales in our golf communities gives strong evidence of this trend. With over 300 sales in the past twelve months in Glenwild, Promontory, Hideout, Tuhaye, Red Ledges, and Victory Ranch, buyer demand remains strong and will likely continue, especially during the summer months. With a wide array of price points, new build options, and ample community amenities, it's no wonder that many second home buyers are investing in these neighborhoods.

With courses now open, make the most of our local golf options and explore your living options in these highly sought after micro-market areas. Reach out for more information on our local golf communities.

 

 

June Happenings in Park City

Sundays All Month - Park Silly Sunday Market

Wednesdays All Month - Park City Farmer's Market

Thursdays All Month - Night Mountain Bike Rides with White Pine 

6/8-6/10 The Kingston Trio at the Egyptian Theatre

6/15 The Watters at the Newpark Amphitheater

6/16 Erickson Antoque Power Show, Wallsburg

6/16 Deer Valley Resort Opens for Summer Operations

6/17 Round Valley Rambler Half Marathon

6/17 Savor the Summit

6/21 Changing Lanes Experience at the Deer Valley Concert Series

6/23-6/25 Bonanza Music Festival in Heber City Featuring Ms. Lauryn Hill and Odesza

6/24 Back to the 50's Car Show, Heber City Park

6/28 The Soulistics at the Deer Valley Concert Series

6/30 Park City Gallery Stroll 

6/30 Annual Oakley Rodeo Begins

  1. Bridgett says:

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Market Recap & May Events

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 17, 2017

Following up on the last two weeks of blogs the Summit and Wasatch County markets remain varied and complex to read, but stable in terms of positive growth. In Park City limits, when compared with last year's first quarter, there has been only a 1% change in average single family home price, suggesting an overall stabilization of the market in town. However, in key development areas like Canyons Village, there was a doubling in the number sales and a 22% increase in average price, suggesting pockets of intense growth where there is new inventory. Similarly, gated golf communities remain popular, and Red Ledges, Glenwild, Tuhaye, and Promontory all saw an increase in the number of sales and in average price. (Remember the Mini Markets that make up Park City)

New condominium projects continue to boast the greatest buyer activity. With 190 condo sales, Jordanelle was the single most active market segment, closely followed by Canyons Village with 177 sales. These newer developments, which feature modern amenities and a range of prices, continue to resonate with sophisticated buyers. This trend is likely to continue with other new projects like those at Canyons Village and Silver Creek Junction.

In Wasatch County, Heber and Midway are the most active single family home markets with 218 and 109 sales, respectively. With new builds, attractive prices, and stunning views, these towns have seen tremendous real estate growth, which we predict will continue. To better navigate our complex market, reach out for information and options.

It is now golf season in Park City! You've Skied America's largest resort, now golf Utah's newest course. Canyons Golf Opens May 26th as well as Summer in the Mountains. From hiking and biking to the Alpine coaster and Kids Adventure Course, Park City offers family friendly activities all summer long!

MAY EVENTS

It's officially spring on the Wasatch Back, which means two-for-one entrees, Running with Ed, and mountain biking. While May can be a bit quiet, locals can find dining coupons, take tours at Red Butte Gardens, and make the most of uncrowded trails. The Egyptian Theatre has a great line up this month as does the Park City Film Series. Here are some events to check out:

All Month Park City Film Series

May 18-20 Hot Tuna at the Egyptian Theatre

May 20 Running With Ed

May 23 Jethro Tull at Red Butte Gardens

May 26 Park City Gallery Stroll 

Beyond Park City, Heber Valley boasts fishing, horseback riding, new restaurants, and dry trail systems in full bloom. Make the most of spring in the Wasatch. A few of our favorite spring hikes are Soapstone Basin, Heber Valley Overlook, and Round Valley, all of which provide spectacular views, wild flowers, and varied levels of difficulty. Here's some Heber Valley happenings:

May 19-20 Heber Valley Horse Sale at the Wasatch County Event Complex

May 26-June 3 Heber Valley Wild West Days

How Is The Park City Market?

By Ramon Gomez, Jr.
May 03, 2017

People always like to ask me... How is the Park City Market? This question comes from both our Buyers and Sellers. This loaded question with no short answer comes down to this... Park City is comprised of many different "micro markets". One area of Park City can be down while another area of Park City is up, and wouldn't you know this can change from quarter to quarter within the same year. Sometimes there are very clear reasons for sudden decreases or increases in our "micro markets" and sometimes not. This my friends is why you need a qualified, knowledgeable, local real estate agent. Let me share some examples of the Park City Market "micro markets" for the first quarter of 2017 as compared to the first quarter of 2016.

Single Family Home Sales - # of Sales this Quarter

Old Town Up 56%

Lower Deer Valley Up 113%

Upper Deer Valley Down 17%

Park Meadows Down 10%

The Canyons Up 60%

Kimball Junction Down 50%

Summit Park Up 150%

Jeremy Ranch Even

Glenwild/Silvercreek Up 233%

Promontory Up 8%

Trailside Down 63%

And why don't you take the Park City area market as a whole... you can see from the percentages above that to talk about the real estate market of Park City as a whole would be somewhat misleading, that being said the Park City area is overall 22% higher for the first quarter than last year this same quarter and interestingly enough Snyderville Basin is also overall 22% higher in closed sales.

Next week we will address the condo market.

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